Meaning of clear bracelets.

Discussion in 'General Scientology Discussion' started by NonServiam, Jun 9, 2019.

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  1. NonServiam

    NonServiam Patron

    Hello there!

    I have been reading more about Scientology and i’m curious about this item called “clear bracelet” only for clear scientologist.

    Where real jewellry? Made in real gold, silver... I have found one los online catalogue with a lot of SCN jewellry.

    In this blog people say the cult sells fake jewellry.

    https://www.mikerindersblog.org/the-upside-down-world-of-scientology/
     
  2. screamer2

    screamer2 Idiot Bastardson

    The meaning of the clear bracelet is this:

    You were taken by a money-grubbing cult started by a pulp writer con man and run by an evil and asthmatic dwarf.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2019
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  3. Dulloldfart

    Dulloldfart Squirrel Extraordinaire

    I've still got a Clear bracelet I bought in 1982. It is genuinely made of Sterling silver. What is fake is what it represents (in this case, that the wearer has achieved a mental/spiritual state with certain abilities). Per policy these things are sold at 5x cost price + 2x postage cost, as far as I remember, so are more expensive than similar items in the real world.

    Paul
     
  4. Voodoo

    Voodoo Free Your Mind And Your Ass Will Follow

    Most people who've achieved the state of Clear, don't even own these things. They were a popular item in the 60s and 70s, but not so much beyond that time. They can still be found in Scn bookstores, as well as other Scn oriented bling.

    And yes, they're actually made of precious metals.
     
  5. NonServiam

    NonServiam Patron

    Including real gold? Or is fake gold.
     
  6. Voodoo

    Voodoo Free Your Mind And Your Ass Will Follow

    Most Clear bracelets are made of sterling silver. If you find a gold one it's probably real, but 14 caret.
     
  7. Clay Pigeon

    Clay Pigeon Silver Meritorious Patron

    When I first started studying at 414 Mason Street in Zen Frongzizzgo back in 1971 I was talking with a student recently returned from LA. He told me of walking into some titty bar and seeing on stage a fetching long haired lass dancing wearing nothing but her sea org boots and her clear bracelet.

    "Yeah," I thought, "This is my kind of church".