The danger of the Scientology belief one chooses one's body and family prior to birth

Discussion in 'Evaluating and Criticising Scientology' started by CommunicatorIC, Sep 9, 2017.

View Users: View Users
  1. CommunicatorIC

    CommunicatorIC @IndieScieNews on Twitter

    The danger of the Scientology belief one chooses one's body and family prior to birth.

    We aleardy saw an example of this in the thread (since moved to Politics and then to Grudge Matches; could we please not repeat that debacle?) about the Facebook post by Scientology OT VIII and Crusader Dolores Mangels concerning transgender people and the bodies they "chose this lifetime."

    [​IMG]

    ;[NOTE: The point of again posting the above is NOT to suggest that anyone be forced to help pay for anyone else's transgender or other surgery, hormone treatment or other medication. It is to provide an example of how the belief that one chooses one's body and family prior to birth: (a) necessarily implies that a baby is completely responsible for their condition; and (b) thus lead to a lack of compassion. While the substance and reasoning of the quoted Facebook post are important,equally important is the tone.]

    We see another example today in Tony Ortega's excellent article (and I highly recommend you read it in full), ‘Leah Remini’ show prompting more ‘ranch kids’ to come forward with agonizing family drama. In that story a young woman informs her mother that she quit the Sea Org:

    * * * * * BEGIN EXCERPT * * * * *

    Once again, Clarissa quit the Sea Org. She was 20.

    “I told my mom. Her response was, ‘Then why did you pick this body? Why did you pick this family?’ She never asked what I was going to do or where I would go. In fact, she didn’t bring it up again at all. I was 20. I had no family to go to. No credit. No driver’s license.” Her father was at the Flag Land Base, in Clearwater, Florida, and Clarissa says he was also shocked to hear the news. “It hit him hard.”

    * * * * * END EXCERPT * * * * *

    There you have it -- the perfect excuse and reason to abdicate any parental responsibility. The perfect excuse and reason not to feel, much less express, any parental love.

    After all, Thetans really don't have parents. The Genetic Entity, a (if not the) product of marriage, is little more than a hunk of flesh meant to be occupied and controlled by the Thetan -- a Thetan to which a parent is NOT related, and with whom a parent really has no meaningful relationship.

    If one truly believes in Scientology, why should you have any more meaningful relationship with, or love and affection for, your child than you do for any other Thetan?

    As I've said before, I personally knew a woman who, when told about a baby who had a pedicatric heart condition, coldly and without a hint of compassion responded, "Why did he pick that body?"

    I've personally knew a different woman who, when informed about a child with pediatic cancer, smugly speculated about the overts the child committed in her prior lifetime to "pull in" the cancer.

    All of this is consistent with, and indeed required by, Hubbard's rule that everyone -- including children with heart conditions and cancer -- is reponsible for their own condition. Pediatic heart condition? Dude, why the hell did you pick THAT body? Pediatic cancer? Sorry, it is not MY problem you picked a weak body that was susceptible to cancer. Make a better choice next time.

    Ideas have consequences.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2017
    • Like Like x 2
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
    • List
  2. George Layton

    George Layton Silver Meritorious Patron

    Lol they should be saying; "Why did I pick this wackjob hubbard for a guru?"
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
    • List
  3. ThetanExterior

    ThetanExterior Gold Meritorious Patron

    I knew a Scientologist whose baby died of so-called "cot death". When someone tried to offer her sympathy she just smiled and said it was okay, the thetan had just decided he didn't want to continue so he left. No problem.
     
  4. Teanntás

    Teanntás Patron Meritorious

     
  5. RogerB

    RogerB Crusader

    Ideas do have consequences . . . and Scientology is rife with bad ones
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Winner Winner x 1
    • List
  6. EZ Linus

    EZ Linus BT-free since 2003!

    This was the very reason I hid my own illness from my friends, hid out in my house for months during the first signs and symptoms, and why I saw seven different doctors hoping for a different opinion, all before I let the news leak. I knew what the consequences were - bridge wise, but worse yet - people were going to become callus and think I pulled it in.
     
  7. Gizmo

    Gizmo Rabble Rouser

    Well, scientologists seem to have a never ending supply of ways to show how utterly stupid they are.

    How many scn'gists are willing to acknowledge that dear old Doctor Hubbard " pulled in " his motorcycle accident that banged him up pretty good, a heart attack, and a stroke or two ?

    Or that dm " pulled in " his lifetime of asthma ?

    Let's not get into mass genocides that have happened - or even the 500 years of the Inquisition ?
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
    • LOL LOL x 1
    • List
  8. Tuppence

    Tuppence Patron

    There are dangers of any thought or belief. So much can be so easily misunderstood, twisted and perverted from it's original meaning.

    If we turn this quote on its head and I share some personal information here, my youngest was born dead, and she got better. She has defied all odds, and they were pretty heavily stacked against her, but perhaps she chose this life full of the challenges she chose, not because she's an evil person or sp, she did not "pull in" anything, rathe she chose this life to help teach. To teach the world love, compassion, hope, reaffirm why they chose to do what they do. She chose the beauty of the difficult life because she wants so badly to show the world the "impossible" does not HAVE to be impossible, just improbable. The quote still applies, but now if we think of the beauty in it, we see she's not bad, evil or suppressive, My daughter is AMAZING, strong, beautiful and a teacher, restorer of purpose, faith and hope. The exact opposite of what some might think upon hearing the quote.

    I do not mean to play the devils advocate, between my mother (a declared SP) and Scientology I have heard this a lot while growing up, and perhaps I have perverted the meaning, but I like how I see it, because to me this can be a wonderful thing.
     

Share This Page