US State Dept International Religious Freedom Report for 2017

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  1. mnql1

    mnql1 Patron Meritorious

    Listed below are passages that mention Scientology in the country sections of the U.S. State Department's International Religious Freedom Report for 2017, released on May 29, 2018.

    For passages from the U.S. State Department's International Religious Freedom Report for 2016, see
    US State Dept International Religious Freedom Report for 2016

    Austria
    Scientologists and some other religious minorities said several government-funded organizations continued to advise the public against associating with them, calling the groups “cults.”
    (...)
    Embassy representatives met regularly with government officials to discuss religious groups’ concerns about issues of freedom of religion and religious intolerance and the integration of religious minorities, including with officials from the Departments of Integration and Dialogue of Cultures within the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and with the Ministry of Interior. Topics included measures to combat anti-Semitism and anti-Muslim sentiment. They also met with religious group representatives, such as the leadership of the Islamic Faith Community (IGGIO), the IKG, the Roman Catholic Church, the Syrian Orthodox Church, and the Church of Scientology, to discuss their relations with the government, instances of discrimination, and interreligious dialogue.
    (...)
    The Church of Scientology and a number of smaller religious groups, such as Sahaja Yoga and the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, have status as associations.
    (...)
    A federally funded office continued to offer the public negative views about religious groups, such as Scientology, which it described as “cults.”
    (...)
    The federal Office of Sect Issues continued to offer advice to persons with questions about groups that it considered “sects” and “cults.” The office was nominally independent but government funded, and the minister for family and youth appointed and supervised its head. Some Scientologists and representatives of the Unification Church continued to state the Office of Sect Issues and other government-associated entities fostered societal discrimination against religious groups not registered as religious societies or confessional communities.

    A counseling center in Vienna managed by the Society against Sect and Cult Dangers, an NGO working against some religious groups, such as Scientology, continued to distribute information to schools and the general public, and it provided counseling for former members of such groups. According to the website of the society’s founder, Friedrich Griess, the society received funding from the government of Lower Austria. Several other provinces funded family and youth counseling offices that provided information on “sects and cults,” which members of some minority religious groups, such as Scientologists or the Unification Church, stated they considered to be negatively biased.
    (...)
    Embassy representatives continued to meet frequently with religious leaders and community members throughout the country, including with the leadership and membership of the IGGIO, IKG, Catholic Church, Syrian Orthodox Church, and other Christian organizations, as well as the Church of Scientology, to discuss the relationship between these groups and the government, discriminatory or inflammatory incidents, and the role of religious education in encouraging interfaith tolerance.

    Belgium
    ...other religious groups that together constitute less than 5 percent of the population include Buddhists, Hindus, Sikhs, the International Society of Krishna Consciousness, Scientologists, and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons).

    Canada
    Buddhists, Hindus, Sikhs, Scientologists, Bahais, and adherents of Shintoism, Taoism, and aboriginal spirituality together constitute less than 4 percent of the population.

    Costa Rica
    Smaller groups include followers of Islam, Taoism, the International Society of Krishna Consciousness, Scientology, Tenrikyo, and the Bahai Faith.

    Denmark
    Groups not recognized by either royal decree or a government registration process, such as the Church of Scientology, are entitled to engage in religious practices without any kind of public registration, but members of those groups must marry in a civil ceremony in addition to any religious ceremony. Unrecognized religious groups are not granted fully tax-exempt status, but they have some tax benefits; for example, contributions by members are tax-deductible.

    France
    Other religious groups estimate their numbers as follows: Jehovah’s Witnesses, 120,000; ... The Church of Scientology, 45,000; ...

    Germany
    Authorities also monitored the Church of Scientology (COS), which reported continued government discrimination against its members.
    (...)
    The Roman Catholic Church and the Protestant Church in Germany (EKD) continued to oppose the COS and some other religious groups publicly.
    (...)
    According to REMID, groups that together constitute less than 1 percent of the population include Buddhists (270,000); ... and COS (5,000-10,000).
    (...)
    The COS does not have PLC [public law corporation] or nonprofit status in any state.
    (...)
    Authorities continued to monitor the COS and some Muslim groups and closed a Berlin mosque they linked to terrorism. ... The COS continued to report instances of government criticism and employment discrimination. In Bavaria, a preschool/kindergarten dismissed a COS member after the state government threatened to withhold public funding, and a Munich museum dismissed a long-time employee after his COS membership became public.
    (...)
    According to reports from the federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution (OPC) – the domestic intelligence service – and state OPCs and COS members, the federal and state OPCs in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Bavaria, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Lower Saxony, NRW, and Thuringia continued to monitor the activities of the COS, reportedly by evaluating Scientology publications and members’ public activities to determine whether they violated the constitution. According to the OPC’s 2016 report, “Scientology aspires to a society without general and fair elections and rejects the democratic legal system.” At least four major political parties (the CDU, the Christian Social Union (CSU), the SDP, and the Free Democratic Party (FDP)) continued to exclude Scientologists from party membership.
    (...)
    The COS continued to report governmental discrimination. “Sect filters,” signed statements by potential employees to confirm they had no contact with the COS, remained in use in the public and private sectors.
    According to a COS spokesperson, in the summer a preschool/kindergarten in Munich dismissed a nurse who was a member of the COS after the city government announced it would cut the kindergarten’s public funding due to the employee. The COS reported the House of Art, a public art museum in downtown Munich, dismissed a long-time employee in March after his COS membership became publicly known. The COS reported the former employee filed a complaint at the Munich labor court. Information on the status of the case was unavailable at year’s end. The media reported the House of Art began using sect filters for new employees in April.
    The COS said firms owned or operated by its members also suffered discrimination. According to the COS, some of its members who suffered discrimination refrained from taking legal action because they felt a trial would be time-consuming and because they feared being stigmatized and losing business contracts.
    (...)
    The Catholic Church and the EKD continued to oppose the COS publicly.
    (...)
    The Catholic Church and the EKD continued to oppose COS publicly. “Sect commissioners” of the EKD and the Catholic Church investigated “sects and cults” and publicized what they considered to be the dangers of these groups. EKD “sect commissioners” warned the public about what they said were the dangers posed by the COS, the Family Federation for World Peace and Unification (Unification Church), Bhagwan-Osho, Transcendental Meditation, and Universal Life. “Sect commissioners” continued to produce print and internet literature portraying these groups unfavorably.
    (...)
    Embassy and consulate general representatives met with members and leaders of numerous local and national religious and civil society groups about their concerns related to freedom of worship. ... Topics of discussion with Jewish groups included concerns of anti-Semitism being imported by refugees into the country. Embassy and consulate general representatives also discussed issues pertaining to religious freedom and tolerance with the Roman Catholic, Protestant, and Evangelical Churches; COS; ZMD; Association of Islamic Cultural Centers; Coordination Council of Muslims in Germany; Alevi Muslims; Council of Religions Frankfurt; Konrad Adenauer Foundation; and human rights NGOs.

    Greece
    Other religious communities report that their members combined constitute between 3 and 5 percent of the population. These include Old Calendarist Orthodox, atheists and agnostics, Roman Catholics, Protestants, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Jews, members of polytheistic Hellenic religions, Scientologists, Bahais, Mormons, Sikhs, Seventh-day Adventists, Buddhists, and members of the International Society of Krishna Consciousness (ISKON).
    (...)
    Religious groups without religious entity status and no house of prayer permits, including Scientologists and the ISKCON, were still able to function as registered nonprofit civil law organizations. The government did not legally recognize weddings conducted by members of those religious groups, whose only option was a civil marriage.

    Haiti
    Groups present in small numbers include The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), Jehovah’s Witnesses, Muslims, Bahais, Rastafarians, Scientologists, and atheists.

    Hungary
    The government launched a criminal investigation of the Church of Scientology (COS) and again barred it from moving into new headquarters.
    (...)
    On December 9, Scientologists protested in Budapest in support of religious freedom for Scientology and other faiths and to protest the law on religion that deregistered hundreds of religious groups, including the Church of Scientology. Local press estimated the number of protesters at approximately 100, while the COS said more than 1,500 persons participated. “We have come to a crossroad for religious freedom in Hungary,” said Attila Miklovicz, Director of Public Affairs of the COS Budapest. Another Scientologist, Timea Vojtilla, stated, “We want the government to ensure true religious freedom, and not let certain agencies hinder the free exercise of our religion.” The demonstration ended with the reading of the Creed of the Church of Scientology.

    Israel, Golan Heights, West Bank, and Gaza [formerly "Israel and the Occupied Territories"]
    Recognized religious communities are exempt from taxation of places of worship and may have separate courts to apply their religion’s personal status law. Some nonrecognized religions, such as Jehovah’s Witnesses, receive a property tax exemption on their houses of worship, although others, such as Buddhism and Scientology, do not. The government has stated that tax collection from nonrecognized religions is conducted by local authorities in accordance with the law, but has not stated why some nonrecognized religions receive a property tax exemption and others do not. While members of recognized religious communities only require approval for resident visas from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, visas for members of nonrecognized religious communities also require MOI [Ministry of Interior] approval for stays longer than five years.

    Kazakhstan
    In April and May, several national TV broadcasts ran thematic programs on “destructive sects,” among them “destructive” Islamic movements, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Scientologists.
    (...)
    Other religious groups that together constitute less than 5 percent of the population include Jews, Buddhists, members of the International Society of Krishna Consciousness, Bahais, members of the Family Federation for World Peace and Unification (Unification Church), and Scientologists.
    (...)
    The Church of Scientology continued to function as a registered public association rather than as a religious organization. The government allowed the church, as a public association, to maintain resource centers/libraries where members may read or borrow books and host discussions or meetings, but did not allow the church to engage in religious activity.

    Government-controlled media continued to depict “nontraditional” religions as disruptive to society. In April and May, several national TV broadcasts ran thematic programs on “destructive sects,” among them Jehovah’s Witnesses and Scientologists. ... A May 12 talk show on “Eurasia” devoted 40 minutes to “destructive sects,” concentrating mainly on “destructive Islamic movements” and Scientology.

    Macedonia
    In May Basic Court Skopje II approved the registration of the Church of Scientology of Macedonia, and the Home of Prayer religious group.

    Russia
    Religious groups constituting less than 5 percent of the population each include Buddhists, Protestants, Roman Catholics, Jews, members of The Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), Jehovah’s Witnesses, Hindus, Bahais, members of the International Society of Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON), pagans, Tengrists, Scientologists, and Falun Gong adherents.
    (...)
    In June 2016 the Russian Supreme Court upheld a 2014 order liquidating the Moscow branch of the Church of Scientology (COS) on the grounds it did not qualify as a religious organization.
    (...)
    The SOVA Center reported that on October 17, the television station Zvezda, owned by the Russian Ministry of Defense, aired a film called Espionage under the Guise of Religion. The program used examples of Scientologists and Jehovah’s Witnesses as “proof” that some representatives of religious minorities and “sects” were closely associated with intelligence agencies in the United States.

    South Africa
    The Church of Scientology estimates it has approximately 100,000 members.
    (...)
    U.S. embassy representatives met with religious leaders and NGOs, including individuals from the Muslim Judicial Council, Islamic Council of South Africa, the Church of Scientology, the Inner Circle (a Muslim lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex organization), Hindu Maha Sabha, and the SAJBD to discuss the environment for religious freedom and concern over cases of anti-Semitism and anti-Muslim sentiment.

    Spain
    Other religious groups include Christian Scientists, other Christian groups, Bahais (approximately 12,000), Scientologists (11,000 members), and Hindus.
    (...)
    In September Director General of the European Office of the Church of ScientologyIvan Arjona Pelado presented religious freedom awards to academics involved with human rights. The main topic of discussion at the ceremony was the right to freedom of belief and respect for the beliefs of others. Pelado emphasized the need to combat intolerance among different religious groups and the responsibility of the international community to promote religious coexistence. Government representatives from the MOJ and Foundation attended.
    (...)
    Embassy officials met and communicated with leaders of CIE, FEREDE, FCJE, the Federation of Buddhist Communities, Scientologists, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and other community members, including imams of local mosques, Muslim youth leaders, NGOs, politicians, and business leaders in Madrid, Barcelona, and Melilla. Embassy and consulate officials heard the concerns of community members regarding discrimination and the free exercise of their religious rights, including anti-Semitism, anti-Muslim sentiment, lack of religious education, and access to permits for places of worship. Embassy officials discussed these concerns separately with appropriate government officials.

    Sweden
    Smaller religious communities include Buddhists, Hindus, Sikhs, Zoroastrians, and members of the Church of Scientology, Word of Faith, the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, the Family Federation for World Peace and Unification (Unification Church), and Mandaeism.

    Taiwan
    Religious groups that total less than 5 percent of the population include ... the Church of Scientology, ...
     
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  2. AnonyMary

    AnonyMary Formerly Fooled - Finally Free

    Thanks so much for posting this, mnql1. Very informative and encouraging on some of the individual country entries. I wish we had more volunteer critics like yourself - helping research, translate, and post on the net information to counter all the church 'dissemination efforts'-- the networking and propagandizing to get what it wants accomplished in each area... to further it's goal of 'clearing the planet'

    You are a good soul.
     
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  3. TheOriginalBigBlue

    TheOriginalBigBlue Gold Meritorious Patron

    LRH wanted Scientology to be "Positioned", or in marketing terms, thought of and associated with things that are popular, ergo the obsession with cultivating celebrities to push the brand.

    However, the dominant positioning that I am seeing here is with "destructive" Islamic groups and Jehovah's Witnesses.

    It's good to see so many government agencies getting it right.
     
  4. mnql1

    mnql1 Patron Meritorious

    The entry concerning Hungary in the OP is incomplete and should read as follows:

    Hungary
    The Fundamental Law (constitution) provides for freedom of religion, including freedom to choose or change religion or belief, and to manifest religion or belief through religious acts, ceremonies, or other means; the constitution’s preamble states the nation recognizes “the role of Christianity” in “preserving nationhood” and values the country’s “various religious traditions.” It prohibits religious discrimination and speech violating the dignity of any religious community. The constitution stipulates separation of religious communities and state and the autonomy of religious communities. According to law, the incorporation of religious groups, which provides for financial benefits and government support, requires the approval of two thirds of parliament. Parliament again did not vote on pending applications for incorporation status by religious groups, in violation of its own legal procedures and despite a finding by the Constitutional Court that the body’s failure to vote was unconstitutional. In July the Constitutional Court ruled parliament must amend the law to allow individuals to donate the same proportion of their taxes to unincorporated religious groups as to incorporated ones; parliament had not done so by year’s end. The government launched a criminal investigation of the Church of Scientology (COS) and again barred it from moving into new headquarters.
    (...)
    U.S. officials also expressed concern about anti-Muslim rhetoric by government officials and about the COS investigation.
    (...)
    Other religious groups together constituting less than 5 percent of the population include Greek Orthodox, the Faith Congregation (a Pentecostal group), the COS, Russian and other Orthodox Christian groups, other Christian denominations, Buddhists, and Muslims.
    (...)
    Summary paragraph. By year’s end parliament had not amended the law as mandated by the Constitutional Court in July to allow individuals to donate a portion of their taxes to religious organizations in the same way they could to incorporated churches. The government paid a fine to a religious group as ordered by the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) as compensation for losses incurred by the government’s revocation of the group’s status as an incorporated church. Parliament also did not vote on any of 14 pending applications by religious groups previously found eligible for incorporation, despite a legal obligation to do so. The government launched a criminal investigation of the COS and denied for a second time permission for the group to move into headquarters in Budapest.
    (...)
    In December 2016, the government’s Data Protection Authority (DPA) launched a data protection investigation of the COS. According to the COS, the DPA seized various documents and files from its offices in Budapest and Nyiregyhaza, including “preclear folders” (PCs) containing what the COS called confidential communications between penitents and their minister. The COS stated the seizure of the PCs constituted a violation of privacy and of members’ right to freedom of religion. In the same month the Church filed a legal complaint contesting the seizures, and individual COS members filed complaints with the ombudsman. On October 17, the DPA issued a report which, according to the COS, portrayed the Church’s spiritual practices as mind manipulation, a portrayal which the COS denied.
    According to the COS, the DPA then filed a complaint against the Church, alleging criminal abuse of personal data, and turned over its seized materials to the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI). On October 18, 60 NBI agents raided the COS headquarters in Budapest, seizing documents and sealing off the building. On October 19, the criminal section of the tax office, investigating possible financial crimes, executed search warrants and seized documents at COS offices in Budapest and 15 other locations. According to the COS, the authorities also froze the Church’s bank accounts and placed a lien on its Budapest headquarters. The Church’s spokesperson called the search “religious suppression under the guise of data protection.” State authorities said their actions stemmed from concerns with methods of personal information collection and storage, and not from the COS’s religious views. The COS said Church members demonstrated in front of the DPA, the tax office, and parliament following the raid. The government did not recognize the COS as an incorporated church but had approved its registration as a religious organization.
    (...)
    In January the government denied for the second time a COS application for a certificate of occupancy for its headquarters and place of worship in Budapest. The government had denied the first application in May 2016 and subsequently issued an order requiring the COS to vacate the building. In January the COS challenged the denial of the certificate of occupancy in the Administrative and Labor Court of Budapest and requested a stay of the order to vacate the site. On October 12, the court denied the request for a stay of the order. The Church appealed the denial, and the appeal was pending at year’s end. COS lawyers said they believed the city of Budapest was acting “in bad faith” and that the Church remained gravely concerned the city could take away its headquarters and place of worship.
    (...)
    On December 9, Scientologists protested in Budapest in support of religious freedom for Scientology and other faiths and to protest the law on religion that deregistered hundreds of religious groups, including the Church of Scientology. Local press estimated the number of protesters at approximately 100, while the COS said more than 1,500 persons participated. “We have come to a crossroad for religious freedom in Hungary,” said Attila Miklovicz, Director of Public Affairs of the COS Budapest. Another Scientologist, Timea Vojtilla, stated, “We want the government to ensure true religious freedom, and not let certain agencies hinder the free exercise of our religion.” The demonstration ended with the reading of the Creed of the Church of Scientology.
    (...)
    U.S. officials also voiced concerns regarding the government’s anti-Islamic rhetoric and the COS investigation.
    (...)
    Embassy officials maintained regular contact with leaders of religious communities, including the four historical groups, as well as Baptists, Muslims, MET, and COS, to understand their issues of concern, encourage religious freedom and tolerance, and discuss the effects of the religion law and anti-Islamic rhetoric.


    Rod Keller also posted about the U.S. State Department's International Religious Freedom Report for 2017 for the Underground Bunker on June 3, 2018:

    The US government continues to fret over how other countries treat Scientology
     
  5. AnonyMary

    AnonyMary Formerly Fooled - Finally Free

    Exactly! But there's more. How easy it is for exes to forget how determined Hubbard was in having his minions infiltrate levels of importance in government and other social community spheres via his plan. This is the PL I operated by as a public member ( Saved to the internet overseas by Jetta back in the 1990s):

    Scientology Secrets
    Public Domain Document
    Distribute Freely

    HUBBARD COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE
    Saint Hill Manor, East Grinstead, Sussex
    HCO BULLETIN OF 23 JUNE AD 10
    [= June 23, 1960]

    SPECIAL ZONE PLAN
    The Scientologist's Role in Life

    ( read on)

    L. Ron Hubbard® (founder & guru), this document:

    ". . . a nation or a state runs on the ability of its department heads, its governors, or any other leaders.It is easy to get posts in such areas unless one has delusions of grandeur or fear of it.

    Don't bother to get elected. Get a job on the secretarial staff or the bodyguard, use any talent
    one has to get a place close in, . . ."
    https://jeta.home.xs4all.nl/scn/Scn-dem-200401/scn/hco/special-zone-plan.html

    Here is a good example of how and why it's used:

    Retail plan is faithful to Scientology canon - PressReader
    https://www.pressreader.com/usa/tampa-bay-times/20170402/282875140630439
    Apr 2, 2017 - byTracey McManus, Tampa Bay Times staff writer

    [..]Written by Hubbard in 1960, it gives the example of a Scientologist ... Shaw said the Special Zone Plan is “simply an idea of how to help every ... [..]
    https://www.pressreader.com/usa/tampa-bay-times/20170402/282875140630439

    Interested exes can help eradicate the cult's expansion in all areas, by observing the networking they are doing as noted in the article above, how they are using Special Zone Plan as OSA and dedicated scientologists and OSA volunteers are doing in this and other zones trying to align with 'opinion leaders', getting good will and more power from it... To do so, it seems important for us to know and never forget this policy inside and out, to understand the mindset, to get oneself a bit of the old glare and try to undo some of which they are doing.

    They go after teachers, school boards, community leaders, police departments, local agencies, local and national non-profit groups, local media... on and on. It's surprising where you will find a scientologist networking.

    But, without committment and only when one has time, would be to help out with the RedX Brigade / Taking Down Co$ on Craigslist to remove their spam and false ads that attempt to lure people in. One could spend a few minutes a day while drinking coffee and accomplish much in an easy-to-do but effective way as part of the team

    RedX tips & Complaints procedure are included in the google doc under the RedXTips tab.
    Flag the lies, whack a few bait & switch ads : https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-Kvg78kCcvo5gL7UfPcmhmbsagTNtdj0y2LAiHVFrCU/pubhtml

    Ongoing thread on WWP Taking down Co$ on Craigslist/ Co$ ads on CraigsList
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2018
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  6. TheOriginalBigBlue

    TheOriginalBigBlue Gold Meritorious Patron

    I'd add that you just don't go to an alternative doctor, dentist or chiropractor without googling them to see if they are a member of WISE or use any Scio buzz words and catch phrases.
     
  7. mnql1

    mnql1 Patron Meritorious

    The entry concerning Russia in the OP is incomplete and should read as follows:

    Russia
    Religious groups constituting less than 5 percent of the population each include Buddhists, Protestants, Roman Catholics, Jews, members of The Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), Jehovah’s Witnesses, Hindus, Bahais, members of the International Society of Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON), pagans, Tengrists, Scientologists, and Falun Gong adherents.
    (...)
    In June 2016 the Russian Supreme Court upheld a 2014 order liquidating the Moscow branch of the Church of Scientology (COS) on the grounds it did not qualify as a religious organization.
    (...)
    According to COS representatives and media, on December 4, the Nevskiy District Court extended the pretrial detention of five COS leaders in St. Petersburg to March 2018. Authorities arrested the five on June 6, when security services raided the St. Petersburg COS branch and homes of its leaders as part of a probe into what they said was possible “illegal entrepreneurship” (i.e., selling religious books), extremism, and incitement of hatred; these charges were punishable by six to 10 years’ imprisonment. Police arrested, interrogated, and detained the Church employees, four of whom received two months’ pretrial detention; the fifth was put under house arrest. On October 19, the court changed the pretrial detention conditions to house arrest for two of the individuals. The prosecution appealed the ruling for house arrest for one of them, Sahib Aliyev, and on November 22, he was taken back to prison. At year’s end, the executive director of the religious group, Ivan Matsitsky, and Aliyev remained in prison.
    The COS petitioned the ECHR following the Supreme Court’s 2016 decision upholding a 2014 order liquidating its Moscow branch on the grounds it did not qualify as a religious organization. The case before the ECHR was pending at the end of the year.
    (...)
    In February media reported the deputy head of the Federation Council’s Committee on Constitutional Legislation and State Development, Yelena Mizulina, would lead a working group to fight the influence of more than “500 destructive sects” operating in the country. Mizulina noted the existing legislation lacked a definition of the term “sect.” She said the MOJ reported 52 sects were banned and dissolved in the country in 2015 and 2016, but “such a large-scale spread of sectarian organizations clearly shows that something is wrong with the existing legislation.” According to the SOVA Center, the working group included several “experts on sects” from the Russian Association of Centers for the Study of Religions and Sects, including its president Alexander Dvorkin; representatives of the ROC-MP; representatives of the security services, including the FSB; and Larisa Astakhova, head of the religious studies department at Kazan Federal University, whose expert testimony on the activities of the Moscow COS served as one of the grounds for liquidating it.
    (...)
    The SOVA Center reported that on October 17, the television station Zvezda, owned by the Russian Ministry of Defense, aired a film called Espionage under the Guise of Religion. The program used examples of Scientologists and Jehovah’s Witnesses as “proof” that some representatives of religious minorities and “sects” were closely associated with intelligence agencies in the United States.
     
  8. Churchill

    Churchill Gold Meritorious Patron

    Excellent post! Thanks!
     
  9. AnonyMary

    AnonyMary Formerly Fooled - Finally Free

    This really concerns me. I wish we had more details. I do know that the Church of Scientology National Affairs Office in Washington DC ( overseen by CSI) run by John Stanard, National Director of Public Affairs, and his wife Sylvia Stanard, Dep Director. I do know that they are still tight with John Coale ( Greta's husband ) and that it would be this office that would be liasoning with any US agencies, as well as with OSA Legal ( Dir Special Affairs DSA) staff in different countries who would be working on the "religious discrimination" matter

    John D. Stanard
    National Director at Church of Scientology International
    https://www.zoominfo.com/p/John-Stanard/1033182417
    http://armstrong-op.gerryarmstrong....from-john-d-stanard-to-fbi-september-12-1984/

    Sylvia Stanard ( Leader of the Fair Game media campaign against A&E, Leah remini et al)
    @SS_StandLeague
    Washington DC STAND Coordinator and deputy director of the Church of Scientology National Affairs Office in Washington DC
    https://twitter.com/ss_standleague

    1985 CSI OSA John Coale, John Stanard

    POLITICAL ACTION COMMITTEE - PAC
    A BRIEFING

    How Scientoloaists can take responsibility for and BE AT CAUSE OVER the Fourth Dynamic

    We have been advised by legislative consultants, by allies who are experienced with the government and Congress and
    even by congressmen themselves that the only viable way to get the attention, assistance or support of politicians is to be in a position to deliver to them either (or both) of their most sought
    after needs - MONEY and VOTES [..]
    John Coale FLAGG PAC 1019 19th st. N.W. Suite 1040 Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 783-6600
    http://www.xenu-directory.net/documents/images/1986-scientology-political-action-committee-flagg.pdf

    https://umbraxenu.no-ip.biz/mediawi...y-political-action-committee-flagg.pdf&page=1

    News articles on the above
    http://www.xenu-directory.net/news/library.php?t=FLAGG+PAC

    It would be very good if anyone knew of the current 'intelligence agency' contacts that office has.