What is Fair Game?

Discussion in 'Fair Game and Disconnection Victims' started by Free to shine, Sep 18, 2011.

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  1. Free to shine

    Free to shine Shiny & Free

    "Fair Game" is a term applied by Scientology to those they consider to be Suppressive Persons, written by L. Ron Hubbard.

    "Fair Game" is a policy created by L. Ron Hubbard which states it is spiritually enriching to use whatever means possible to destroy anyone who is critical of L. Ron Hubbard or his cult.

    "Fair Game" has been and continues to this day to be used against people who have left scientology or speak out about it.


    HCO POLICY LETTER OF 23 DECEMBER 1965
    (Replaces HCO Policy Letter of 7 March 1965, Issue I. This was originally misdated as 1 March 1965) SUPPRESSIVE ACTS
    SUPPRESSION OF SCIENTOLOGY AND SCIENTOLOGISTS
    THE FAIR GAME LAW

    A full scan of this policy letter is available here: http://www.suppressiveperson.org/sp/archives/820
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    HCO Policy Letter of 18 October 1967,
    Issue IV

    PENALTIES FOR LOWER CONDITIONS

    (Applies both Orgs and Sea Org)​

    by L. Ron Hubbard
    ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

    Full Scan here: http://www.xenu.net/fairgame-e.html
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    HUBBARD POLICY LETTER OF 21 OCTOBER 1968

    ---------------------------------------------------
    SPDL Note: Hubbard's fair game doctrine, when he laid it out in his Policy Letter of 18 October 1967, was quickly recognized by thinking government officials, journalists and citizens as calling for violent, illegal actions against the cult's "enemies." As a result, he issued another Policy Letter dated 21 October 1968 entitled "Cancellation of Fair Game," that the Miscavige regime insists cancelled this criminal doctrine. But Hubbard was just fair gaming his "enemies" with his "cancellation," just playing a trick on them. He "cancelled" the use of the term " fair game" when declaring people "enemies" or "SPs," with the cynical excuse that it caused bad PR, but he ordered that the same " treatment" of those "enemies" continue as before. The Scientologists in the Hubbard regime knew that the same violent, antisocial and criminal actions were to be taken against these "enemies," the "SPs." Fair game would continue, but it would not be called by that name.
    http://suppressiveperson.org/spdl/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=301&Itemid=30
     
  2. Jump

    Jump Operating teatime

    'Suppressive Persons' are considered to be 'Fair Game', but the term mainly refers to the tactics used to harass, trick, sue, lie to or generally destroy the SP. This is one of many reasons that Scientology should not be considered a religion.
     
  3. Mark A. Baker

    Mark A. Baker Sponsor

    You've got very strange ideas about what associated practices characterize a religion. :eyeroll:

    Historically many other religions have also relied upon such vicious practices to promote themselves and their own doctrines & dogmas. Christianity wouldn't be 'mainstream' today were it not steeped in historically vicious practice. Nor is all such conduct a 'thing of the past' among the major faiths of the modern world.

    Viciousness is not a reason to deny the legitimacy of the Co$ claims to a religious character. If anything vicious policies & conduct are arguments in support of the Co$'s claims to a religious nature.


    Mark A. Baker
     
  4. SchwimmelPuckel

    SchwimmelPuckel Genuine Meatball

    Mr.Baker is right! - Religious groups has historically dismembered and murdered infidels and generally behaved like a mafia or a motorcyle gang of the worst kind.

    Scientology continues the proud tradition...

    They behave 'somewhat' civilized at this time because Hubbard observed that shooting people in the head was frowned upon in current society.. This, of course, will change when Scientology get's to say what legal and what's not.

    And while, 'viciousness is not a reason to deny the legitimacy of the Co$ claims to a religious character', it IS a very good reason to give 'em the abominable finger and clean them off the face of the earth.. They can be a 'religion' while being flushed out the toilet for all I care..

    :yes:
     
  5. Veda

    Veda Sponsor

    "I can make Napoleon look like a punk." L. Ron Hubbard, from his 'Excalibur' letter of 1938, writing of those who would interfere with his plan to "smash" his "name into history."

    From the 1969 HCOPL, 'Discipline - SPs and Admin':

    "I am not interested in 'wog' morality... If anyone is getting industrious trying to enturbulate or stop Scientology or its activities, I can make Captain Bligh look like a Sunday School teacher."


    From 'Keeping Scientology Working', 7 February, 1965:

    "We're not playing some minor game in Scientology. It isn't something cute to do for lack of something better.

    "The whole agonized future of this planet, every Man, Woman, and Child on it, and your own destiny for the next endless trillions of years depend on what you do here and now with and in Scientology :unsure::ohmy::yes:

    "This is a deadly serious activity. And if we miss getting out of the trap now, we may never again have another chance :spacecraft:. [See 'Implantology'] Remember, this is our first chance in all the endless trillions of years of the past . Don't muff it now because it seems unpleasant or unsocial to do Seven [Hammering out of existence incorrect technology], Eight..."


    Just prior to the appearance of 'KSW', was published the piece 'My Philosophy', in which L. Ron Hubbard told Scientologists:

    "Blinded with injured optic nerves, and lame with physical injuries to the hip and back, at the end of World War II, I faced an almost nonexistent future. My service record stated: 'This officer has no neurotic or psychotic tendencies whatsoever', but also stated, 'permanently disabled physically'.

    "And so there came a further blow. I was abandoned by family and friends :violin: as a supposedly hopeless cripple and probable burden on them for the rest of my days."


    And, on 7 March 1965, one month after the appearance of 'KSW' was published 'Suppressive Acts, Suppression of Scientology and Scientologists, the Fair Game Law':

    "A Suppressive person or group becomes 'fair game'.

    "By Fair Game is meant, without rights for self, possessions or position, and no Scientologist may be brought before a Committee of Evidence or punished for any action taken against a Suppressive Person or group...

    "Suppressive acts are defined as actions or omissions undertaken to knowingly suppress, reduce, or impede Scientology or Scientologists.

    "Such suppressive acts include public disavowal of Scientology... public statements against Scientology.


    "[Suppressive acts also include] continued membership in a divergent group; continued adherence to a suppressive person or group pronounced a suppressive person or group by HCO; failure to handle, or disavow, or disconnect from a person demonstrably guilty of suppressive acts; being at the hire of anti-Scientology groups or persons.

    "[Suppressive acts also include] 1st degree murder, arson, disintegration of persons or belongings not [underlining added] guilty of suppressive acts.

    "[Suppressive Persons] place themselves beyond any consideration for their feelings :nazi:or well being...

    "The homes, property, places, and abodes of persons who have been active in attempting to suppress Scientology... are all beyond any protection."


    In 1968, the public use of the name "Fair Game" was prohibited, as it caused "bad public relations." However, all Fair Game practices, and the Fair Game philosophy, continued. Hubbard also developed an extensive Fair Game (attack and covert attack) Tech for use against Scientology's "enemies."

    A few years later, he developed PR Tech, with which to shroud applications of Scientology's Fair Game philosophy and Tech, and with which to better handle any "PR flaps" resulting from occasional exposures of the use of Fair Game.
     
  6. Free Being Me

    Free Being Me Crusader

  7. all too true mark

    but christianity did quite unviciously well for three centuries until constantine wed church and state. i have read in the fourth century the number of nominally christians killed by other nominal christians dwarfed the number killed by roman persecution in the first three centuries combined. don't know how true that is but, for instance, the thirty years war certainly makes truth of the remark
     
  8. This is NOT OK !!!!

    This is NOT OK !!!! Gold Meritorious Patron

    Not true.

    Dox?
     
  9. great stuff

    i recently saw a list of "suppressive groups" and it included the universal life church. as it happens i was legally ordained as a member of clergy in the ULC shortly before i began to study dianetics

    AHA!!!

    the "why" on CB's case has been found!
     
  10. Mark A. Baker

    Mark A. Baker Sponsor

    Completely true. :biggrin: You are simply demonstrating your ignorance of actual christian history. :yes:

    Go research the forced christianization of europe by the catholic church. One particularly interesting little anecdote is that of the Emperor Julian, aka The Apostate, and how he came to have been raised as a christian in the first place. Key question: what happened to his family and why.

    Christians love to cite their martyrdom at the hands of the Pagan Emperors. What they generally don't mention is their own conduct once they had maneuvered themselves into places of power in the empire. The Pagan Emperors only sanctioned persecution of subgroups such as christians rarely during their history. Even then again only due to the perception of a real threat to the internal security and cohesion of the empire. The letters of Pliny make that point well.

    Pagan Rome was remarkably tolerant of foreign religions and religious practices. The extant works of many Roman classical literary figures make that point clearly. Juvenal is renowned for, among many things, the cleverness and wit in his complaints concerning the spread of foreign religion in Rome itself; rather like modern day blue staters bitching about non-christian religions in the u.s.. :biggrin:

    When the christians came to power in Rome they used the full might of the Roman state continually and over a period involving centuries to systematically stamp out all other expressions of religious practice. They were thorough, cunning, and brutal, all as they saw fit. The modern term for that sort of behavior is religious genocide. Of course for the christians, they simply saw themselves as "doing god's work". :puke:

    The upshot of their efforts left christianity as the only game in town, hence it's "mainstream" status even to this day. It's taken the Enlightenment and the development of global communications to make inroads into the cultural, religious, and philosophical lockdown imposed on western societies by christian religious institutions. Even after centuries the effects of the forced imposition of christianity are clearly seen in the privileges enjoyed by christian institutions in the western world by law and tradition.

    Rome as a pagan empire was actually remarkably tolerant of diverse religious practices. The Roman state encouraged the continued cultivation of local gods as a means of helping to maintain social stability throughout the empire. The principle exceptions to that were the gods of Carthage and the Druidic religion of Northern Europe, both of which traditionally required human sacrifice. Pagan Rome had no tolerance for human sacrifice as a religious practice.

    Contrary to christian propaganda, Pagan Romans considered human sacrifice to appease gods, any gods, to be blasphemous and offensive to divinity. Rumors of christian involvement with such practices were actually a factor occasionally used in justifying persecutions of christians early in the history of its spread. Like the Xenu story, it was largely a result of the secretive nature of christian religious practices at the time combined with a misconception of what actually occurred during that practice.


    Mark A. Baker
     

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