Arnie Lerma needs help down under - a trip to a library

Lermanet_com

Gold Meritorious Patron
I need a copy of a book, it's only 35 pages. I have searched all over for a copy for sale, no luck... I have found it in the following locations down under using worldcat.org

Displaying libraries 1-4 out of 4 Show libraries holding just this edition
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1. ROYAL AUSTRALIASIAN COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS
History of Medicine Library
SYDNEY, AU-NS 2000 Australia

librarian: Liz Rouse
Telephone: (02) 9256 5413


2. STATE LIBRARY OF NSW DIXSON LIBRARY
SYDNEY, 2000 Australia
Author Libra.
Title Mindology, or : the development of the human character / Libra.
LOCATION CALL # STATUS
Mitchell Library 167.3/1A1 AVAILABLE
Published Sydney : Wm. Howitt, 1902.
Description 35 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Subject Physiognomy.
Character.
Notes Caption title.
Other Title Development of the human character
Dewey 138
Bib Util 4443913

3. National Library of Australia (NLA)
CANBERRA, ACT 2600 Australia
Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card.
Details Collect From
Np 138 L697 Main Reading Room (Australian Collection)


4.Monash University Library
AU-VI 3800 Australia
Expand Matheson Library Rare Books: Travers Collection locations Matheson Library Rare Books: Travers Collection (AUS 138 L697M ) Available
Status Category Call number Description Request Options
Available book (Rare) AUS 138 L697M

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Libra.
Find more information about:
OCLC Number: 220022401
Notes: Caption title.
Description: 35 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Other Titles: Mindology, or Development of the human character
Author: Libra.
Publisher: Wm. Howitt, 1902

I'll pay for xerox, postage, and lunch...

Thanks in advance
pm for mailing instructions (scans via email @ 200 dpi fine, if its got 6pt type footnotes, 300 dpi)

arnie lerma

The existence of this book was posted to whyweprotest from THIS search of the Australian National Library Archives:

MR. Cooke and his Critics.
To the Editor.
Sir, - the crackle of thorns under the pot, the noise of the school captains and the shouting’s – all because Mr. Cooke has announced himself a disciple of the celebrated philosopher of Goober Valley. McGuphin’s teachings are not yet stale with age. Mr. Calderon, in his valuable life of D.V Green the Oxford scholar, tells how the Goober doctrines were recently promulgated in Oxford itself, with what result we may gather from Mr. Cooke’s lectures. The very Dons are beginning to learn that you cannot get upstairs by sliding down the bannisters. Fortunately, the reform required is easy of achievement. Reverse the present methods, and all will be right. Dr. McGuphin has shaken existing scholastic establishments. They now totter to their fall. His “Outline of Mindology” marked an era, and in Mr. Cooke the learned author seems to have found a ready, able, and eloquent apostle. I cannot do better than to make a running summery of the Goober principles. The study of mind is essential to the teacher, for Education is the development of mind. Contrary to conventional ideas, the youthful mind deals with the general, not the particular. The humdrum teacher attempts to store the mind of his victims with isolated, non-correlated facts. The child’s first impressions are of space and time, quality and quantity, existence and non-existence. It is to the study of these things that the youthful mind must be directed. Dr. McGuphin deals with those ideas under the general title of Exitology. Later when the child is about ten, we come to Scientology, or a general view of science. The child readily digests the doctrines of Positivism in the writings of Mather Whitting, and those of his school, in which Herbert Spencer is included. From science in general to the particular sciences is now an easy step, chemistry, biology, astronomy – culminating in the greatest study of all, man. Man must be studied in all his relations, his history, and his language, commencing at the present day. Modern languages must be mastered before the dead past be ransacked. We must commence with the known, and work back as far as we have power towards the unknown. “We must begin with today, and work back through yesterday to the commencement.” I have put within the quote marks the remark of the great philosopher, which in my judgment, has the most cogent relation to the present discussion. If Oxford deigns to listen to such modern doctrine, might not our local teachers turn an attentive ear?
Yours, etc,
Applecross. August 11, 1903
 
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scooter

Gold Meritorious Patron
SydAnons? Supafreak? Pyro?:confused2:

This looks like a delicious find to me.:biggrin:

Sorry Arnie but I'm hours from Sydney and currently working 6 days a week.

But I'm sure someone will contact you soon - this looks like an offer too good to refuse:yes:
 

Petey C

Silver Meritorious Patron
Arnie, I will try to see whether I can get one of the libraries to make a photocopy of it, if it's only 35 pages long. PM me if you like.
 

Dulloldfart

Squirrel Extraordinaire
Is someone going to assert something about this 1903 coining of an unremarkable word?

As a comparison, if someone called something they had built "Paul's Robot" prior to 2006 would it make any difference to my creation?

Paul
 

Freeminds

Bitter defrocked apostate
An unremarkable word, perhaps... but one with connotations of fraud and abuse.

It is of interest in much the same way that it'd be notable if German astronomer Friedrich Bessel (1784 – 1846) had written a pamphlet on 'National Socialism'. (Which he didn't.)

But don't mind me. When I saw the thread title, "Arnie Lerma needs help down under..." I only dropped by to recommend an antiseptic cream.
 

Type4_PTS

Diamond Invictus SP
Is someone going to assert something about this 1903 coining of an unremarkable word?

As a comparison, if someone called something they had built "Paul's Robot" prior to 2006 would it make any difference to my creation?

IF it were found that you had also used some of the ideas of the previous creator of Paul's Robot and presented them as your own then this would be significant.

Not that Hubbard would do such a thing. :whistling:
 

RogerB

Crusader
Arnie,

The book is highly likely now in microfiche. It might even have been scanned electronically.

I have pulled docs such as these from the NSW Public Library (in Sydney) and the New York Public Library..

It might be productive if you (or a local) first contact the library by phone or email to ascertain the format they have in storage.

There are several reasons these old books, publications etc., get put on microfilm or are digitized . . . 1) it saves massively on storage space and , 2) it protects the information in the case where the paper of the original is not "acid-proof" . . . newsprint as an example turns to dust after several decades.

I thus suggest finding out what format they have in storage . . . and you might be able to get them to either email you a digital or a copy of the film that you than easily use here in the the US.

Rog
 

Lermanet_com

Gold Meritorious Patron
Arnie,

The book is highly likely now in microfiche. It might even have been scanned electronically.

I have pulled docs such as these from the NSW Public Library (in Sydney) and the New York Public Library..

It might be productive if you (or a local) first contact the library by phone or email to ascertain the format they have in storage.

There are several reasons these old books, publications etc., get put on microfilm or are digitized . . . 1) it saves massively on storage space and , 2) it protects the information in the case where the paper of the original is not "acid-proof" . . . newsprint as an example turns to dust after several decades.

I thus suggest finding out what format they have in storage . . . and you might be able to get them to either email you a digital or a copy of the film that you than easily use here in the the US.

Rog

Goes without saying to contact the library you are planning to visit, worldcat entered the distance in miles from where i am to where the library was... they were 9300 miles away from me.

arnie
 

Ted

Gold Meritorious Patron
[...]
The child’s first impressions are of space and time, quality and quantity, existence and non-existence. It is to the study of these things that the youthful mind must be directed. Dr. McGuphin deals with those ideas under the general title of Exitology. Later when the child is about ten, we come to Scientology, or a general view of science. The child readily digests the doctrines of Positivism in the writings of Mather Whitting, and those of his school, in which Herbert Spencer is included. From science in general to the particular sciences is now an easy step, chemistry, biology, astronomy – culminating in the greatest study of all, man. Man must be studied in all his relations, his history, and his language, commencing at the present day. Modern languages must be mastered before the dead past be ransacked. We must commence with the known, and work back as far as we have power towards the unknown. “We must begin with today, and work back through yesterday to the commencement.” I have put within the quote marks the remark of the great philosopher, which in my judgment, has the most cogent relation to the present discussion. If Oxford deigns to listen to such modern doctrine, might not our local teachers turn an attentive ear?
Yours, etc,
Applecross. August 11, 1903


Taken out of context here, the word Scientology has little significance except to anyone trying to make a mental leap concerning Hubbard and his plagarisms.

The bolded quote, however, is very interesting.
 

Rene Descartes

Gold Meritorious Patron
Epic find!

I strongly recommend someone get onto this right away before a bot from a quasi-church heads out and burns that literature to prevent someone from displaying the use of that word in an earlier context of existence of this world.

Huh? What the hell did I just say? I can't even udnerstand it myself.

Okay just get the book before someone burns it.

Rd00
 

R2-45

Silver Meritorious Patron
Arnie,

You may find this interesting:

58. Scientology, is, on the contrary, that Branch or Aspect of Universology in which the Universe is considered and treated as consecutively and logically evolved from the Three Abstract Universal Principles above specified (2, 45), related to the Three Primary Numbers. It is, in other words, the Logical and Mathematical Evolution of Being universally, from the Primordial Categories or Basis-Thoughts of Being. Scientology is therefore Universology developed in the spirit of the Exact Sciences, and is wholly new in kind. It is the Core or Centre and the most distinctive Department of Universology, that in which the discovery of this New Universal Science mainly consists; but it is proportionally less popular, in character, and more remote from old and existing scientific ideas.


59. Artology is that Branch or Aspect of the Science of the Universe in which the somewhat popular truths of Naturology and the new and more metaphysical truths of Scientology are, as it were.


60. Scientology is new, and remote from the popular apprehension, alike of the learned and unlearned world. Artology, depending, as it does, for one of its factors, upon Scientology, is, consequently, also new. Naturology, alone, answers to the whole scope of the Sciences as they have hitherto been cultivated and developed, and furnishes, therefore, the Natural Basis of the New Science. This, while it is, in a sense, popular, and closely related to the Natural Sciences as they are already studied and understood in the world, still, is not, in its Universological sense, merely the Aggregate of those Sciences, as they now stand in the minds of the Learned. It is, on the contrary, the whole body of those Sciences as re-cast and re-constituted, Universologically, and by a Reflect of Exactification cast from Scientology, (the Sun and Centre of Universology), upon this Primitive and naturally Inexact Domain. The method, even here, is Analogical, and the result is to unify these primitive and fragmentary Sciences by bringing them under the operation of that Identity of Law which is demonstrated and expressly elaborated in the Scientological Branch of Universology.


69. The Scientology of Language begins, along with the Logical Order of the Encyclopedic or Observational Method, In The Alphabet, or strictly speaking, back of the Alphabet, as will be shown presently, (79.) But in respect to the Alphabet, it begins in that More Rigorous Analysis, in that closer discrimination and classification of the Elementary Sounds of Speech which is known as "Phonetic Analysis." It passes over also from the consideration of the Elements of the Single or Individual Language to the comparison of the Elements of different Languages; and hence, from the Monospherology to the Comparology of the subject (B. O. t. 403), and hence again, to the founding of One Universal and strictly Scientific Alphabet for the representation of all Languages.


72. But to complete, or more properly to even initiate, this new order of investigation, the Scientology of the Universe and of Speech, we must discover the meaning which Nature attaches to each Elementary Articulate Sound of the Voice; for if the Elements of Sound are the Analogues or Individual Echoes of the Elements of the Universe itself, which are the Proto-pragmata and Abstract Principles of which it is composed, then it follows that each sound of the voice in speech, such as is represented by a Lottar of 46 INHERENT MEANINGS OF SOUNDS.


74. Out of this discovery arises, therefore, logically, and as it were inevitably, a New Universal Language, the most wonderful and complete in its structure and powers of which it is possible to conceive, and which must serve as the Vernacular of the Unitized Humanity or Great Planetary Nation of the Future. It is, then, the Philosophy and Linguistic Science underlying and intimately involved in this New Language throughout, which constitute the Scientology of Linguistic; and the Corresponding Philosophy and Science of the Universe at large is the Scientology of Universology. The reaction of the Philosophy of the New Scientific Language upon the understanding of existing tongues, or upon the previous Science and Sciences of Language, will constitute the Universological Aspect of Lingual Naturohgy (60, 61) ; and the similar reaction of Universological Scientology upon the existing Sciences, recasting them into the mould of its own character, will be the Universologi 'dl Aspect of Naturology at large. Finally, the interblending and mutual modification and modulation of the old and new materials of Lingual Knowledge and Use will constitute the Artology of Speech. (59, 77.)


75. To restate these points: The Naturology of Language is not confined to Grammar or Lexicology (the Dictionary), nor to any other particular department of the Science of Language, as now understood; nor to all of them combined; not even if we include Comparative Grammar or Comparative Etymology, with all the surprising expansion which has been given to that Branch of Science by the German School of Philologists. Linguo-Naturology or the Naturology of Language includes, on the contrary: First, in its ordinary or Non-Universological sense, all of these Departments of the Lingual Domain, or the whole of Linguistic, in any or every sense in which Language has heretofore been studied; and Secondly, in its Universological Aspect, it includes all of this Primary Body of Lingual Science as it willbe recast from the influence of the new Philology. In the same manner, Naturology, at large, includes, in an ordinary sense, all the existing Sciences in their present state; and, in a Universological Sense, the same Body of the Sciences as they will be enlarged and reconstituted from Scientology.


76. Linguo-Scientology or the Scientology of Language is the new and totally distinct department of the Science of Language, as above sketched, which arises out of the discovery of the Inherent Meanings of Sounds, and of the Scientific Law of their combinations, to constitute, basically, the Unitary and Perfect Language of Mankind. Scientology, at large, holds the corresponding relation to the Total Universe, and is the Back-lying and Regulative Abstract Science or Exactology of the Universe.

77. Linguo-Artology or the Artology of Language, the resultant of the Interblending of the Naturology and Scientology of Language, will be best illustrated by the Final Form of the World's Vernacular, which will be a Single Grand Planetary Language, with the New Scientific Lingual Structure as Basis and Governing Head of the whole, together with the materials of all existing Languages (the Naturismus of Speech) sifted, recast and inwrought into this Completed and Sublime Lingual Fabric, the dialects of which will not be distributed, as now, by the mere accidents of locality and race, but by the Departments or Spheres of the Totality of Human Knowledge and affairs.

78. The name of the New Scientific Language is Alwato (pronounced Ahl-wah-to), a word derived from the Language itself, and meaning Universal Speech, (Al for All, and wato for Speech or LanGuage). It is also called, somewhat more technically, Tiktwa, (pronounced tee-kee-wah), a word also wrought out from the Language itself, and referring to Unism and Duism as the Scientific Bases of Speech. The preliminary steps for the exhibition of this new Language occur in this Synopsis, in connection with Phonetics. The development of the Language itself will be carried forward in subsequent and special Treatises, Grammars, Vocabularies, etc.

This is from "The Primary Synopsis of Universology and Alwato: The New Scientific Universal Language" By Stephen Pearl Andrews published in 1871.

Above are only some of the sections that contain the word "Scientology" - there are 24 in all.

Here is a link: link

:)
 

R2-45

Silver Meritorious Patron
Here is a review of the book mentioned above from "The Nation" May 18th, 1871:



The Primary Synopsis of Universology and Alwato. By Stephen Pearl Andrews. (New York: Dion Thomas. 1871.)—This book is a brief compendium of " The Basic Outline of Universology." Universology is "the Science of the Universe itself, as the One, Grand, All-inclusive Domain." Mr. Stephen Pearl Andrews is the inventor of the science of Universology. "Alwato" is another of his inventions; it is the new scientific universal language. When we read—and the reader will please notice that what follows is not Mr. Andrews's Alwato but his English—that "This new Stage of Science is technically the Descending Wing of the Duismal Stage of the Scientific Mental Evolution lapping over the Trinismal or Integral Method and governing it, as Induction arose, at the other extreme, out of the Unismal Stage ;" or that " the Non-Metals, Aerial, Upward andfront-wise tending, or as it were, visibly presentative, are generically ElectroXegative, or allied with the Lightning, the Grand Type, and, as it were. Fountain, of Electricity in the Cosmos, and with its Aerial Position overhead or above; and Electro-Negative because they are so allied,since things are not attracted to the Pole of Being which is identical with their own nature; they, therefore, being of the nature of the Lightning and of the Light (or Front-Presence) are attracted to the Metals, which are of the nature of the Earth beneath, and of Obscurity, or of that region of the Edifice (or of the Human Body, to which the Edifice is an Adjustment) which is pointed downward, and behind "—on reading such sentences, we say, we should he laying claim to steadier hrains than we possess if we did not cheerfully resign this hook to the admiration of Mr. Andrews and his disciples. All the more should we be centent to give it over on being told that it " declines the jurisdiction of the technically so-called learned or scientific world as a special body of judges, and comes for understanding and appreciation to the general mind of humanity, learned and unlearned alike, according to inherent capacity;" but we cannot overlook in the preface a card in which, among others, Mr. Parke Godwin, President Barnard of Columbia College, Professor Youmans, Ex-Mayor Opdyke, and Judge Daly state that, " having listened to Mr. Stephen Pearl Andrews's preliminary statement of his 'Universology,' and been impressed with the importance and originality of the new scientific claim, as well as with the profound research implied in it, [they] do cordially concur in urging the publication of the work at the earliest possible date." Names of such weight demand that we should divest ourselves of all flippant prejudices and give the book a careful examination.


We readily agree with President Barnard and Professor Youmans that the book is original; but is it important? is the research profound? This book concerns itself with the " Scientology of Language." Mr. Andrews affirms that " Every Alphabetic Sound of the Human Voice is inherently laden by nature herself with its specific significance or meaning; that the Aggregate of these meanings is, at the same time, the Aggregate of the Fundamental Entities and Principles of the Universe of Matter and Mind ; and that, hence, a Language rightly built up from the combinations of these sounds must exactly echo to and represent, from the broadest Generalizations to the minutest details, the Total Universe of Matter and Mind, itself built up in parallel development from the Echoing or Corresponding Entities or Principles." Let us examine some of the inherent meanings of the alphabetic sounds.


A (ah) represents Thickth ; Up-and-down-ness, etc. U, back, shade, retiracy, obscurity (as of the posterior and inferior portions of the body); occultness, turbidity, dubiosity, etc., etc., etc. COLLOID. W, cardinated sequentiality (waddling, wagging, waggling, walking). "—n (The nasalization, or nasal twang), incomprehensibility, mystery, the ineffable; je ne sais quoi. K expresses, break, roughness, turn, beat, and grab ; L, not-broken-ness, not rough ness, not-roundness, not-grabbed—for example, Ziquid, Ziquor (what is let to flow), fiber, a book, the leaves of which fall asunder or are free." Can Mr. Andrews put his hand on his heart and say that the I in tobster or /ion owes its presence to the fact that we do not grab them? And do Messrs. Godwin, Youmans, and Barnard seriously mean to say tha^ they find here a scientific claim of vast importance? Is there profound research in the derivation of
substance from sub-stans T or of forma (which the author accordingly writes ferrima) from ferre T Do those gentlemen really believe that there was a great necessity for the publication at the earliest possible date of such compounds as "Paus" (p. 180), which means "single or simple abstractoid linear-PARTiNGS-a»<i-point-]ike-UNiTiN08; single Hlkgikgs viewed from the Flanges to the Rivet-and-joint; or single Triangulations viewed from the Legs to the Apexes (or Apices) of the Angles; converging or diminishing conicities; comings or bringings to aPoint, whence Positings, pointings "1 Or " Aups " means " single or simple abstractoid linear-coMJiter-PARTiNGS-and-point-like-UNiTiNGS," etc., etc., etc., for eight lines, at the end of which we are bidden to compare the English open and the Greek Ops, the eye.


We can leave it to the Saturday Review's accurate and penetrating reviewer of American books to be "so satirical " over this representative work of American philology. The extracts we have given above are very good specimens of the "importance, originality, and profound research" which characterize it. It has for a long time been easy enough to get meaningless praise of a book after its publication, but it is a novel as well as a sad Bight when such men as those who signed the card from which we have quoted endorse and approve this unmitigated nonsense before it has seen the light, and thus help delude the ignorant into the beliof that here is the solution of the universe, the great science of the future. It is high time we had a1 single word by which to express that culpable amiability by which alone we can account for their action. We bespeak for it the early attention of the inventor of "Alwato."
Here is a link.

:)
 

Mystic

Crusader
Oh this is great stuff. Keep the discoveries coming!

Of course, L. Ron Hubbard :grouch:, being but a conjured mind-being incarnated, more than likely never ran across any of these early publications. He was just spewhole for his input sources.
 

RogerB

Crusader
Goes without saying to contact the library you are planning to visit, worldcat entered the distance in miles from where i am to where the library was... they were 9300 miles away from me.

arnie
??? Ehh?

I was suggesting a phone call or email to see if the library had a digital or other copy they could send you without having to "visit."

Umm like, how did Cherished get her image of the ancient newsclip.

and PS: you're about 2,000 miles closer to them than I am.

R
 

Ogsonofgroo

Crusader
Well, spent some time looking through my usual book finders etc., and as Roger said it'd be best to talk directly to the library still having a copy, they'd probably be amiable to sending you a PDF copy or some such for a small fee for their time.
All my searches lead me in a few circles involving archaic Victorian searchers of the mind, palmestry, physiognomy, astrologists, and the ilk.
I am wondering if you have searched the US library of congress data base? ya never know :)

Good luck, why you'd even bother is beyond me though :shrug: (sorry, only my minor opinion added there, no disrespect).

That said, if you are a member of a local library, you'd be amazed at how co-operative they can be even over borders/countries. Quite a few years ago I had to carve a set of clan emblems on a comission and was deep into researching the proper emblems. Our wonderful librarian here did some hunting around and lo, a few weeks later phoned me up and called me down to the library. I went, and to my amazement was given a book printed in the early 18th century about the clans, frikken amazed I was as the repository for this book was half way across the world. Though I could not take it out I was able to scan a few pages etc. and did my job (which I might add turned out awesome). Anyhow, its an avenue to approach if nobody is able to do this for you down-under.
just a thought :)

:cheers:
 

Magoo

Gold Meritorious Patron
Arnie I have to say, you (and many others)

NEVER cease to amaze me.

Good find!

Hope someone in those areas can find it for you. :biggrin:

My best to you and all :rose:

Tory/Magoo
 
G

Gottabrain

Guest
Hi Arnie,

I have a few hours available today before my shift and a current NSW library card. I'll have the librarian do a search through the libraries here and see if I can find and photocopy these for you.

Might be at one of the uni libraries, I'll ask some Anon uni students to look, too.

Sheila
 

R2-45

Silver Meritorious Patron
What are the chances of lrh having swiped some of Andrews' style and ideas from 1871? Note the similarities in style and the profusion of -isms, -nesses, and other suffixes, prefixes, and compound neologisms such as "Up-and-down-ness, not-broken-ness, not-roughness, not-roundness, not-grabbed" I am startled by the similarity to lrh's style-isms.


And what an interesting character, this Stephen Pearl Andrews:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Pearl_Andrews


http://famousamericans.net/stephenpearlandrews/


Another review, from "The Index" a weekly paper devoted to "Free Religion", edition of July 15th, 1871:

"Universology."

One of the most curious books ever published is the "Primary Synopsis of Universology and Alwato," by Stephen Pearl Andrews. The strangeness and uncouthness and pedantry of the style, the intolerable and needless profusion of neologisms, the extravagant use of italics and the more than Germanic redundancy of capitals, make his pages bristle with difficulties even to the most patient and enthusiastic believer in his astounding claims; while the ordinary reader will be apt either to fling the book aside in despair or disgust or else to burst into the "inextinguishable laughter of the gods." Nothing would be easier than to ridicule it; few things would be harder than thoroughly to understand it. In fact, we have neither time nor inclination to take pains necessary to become complete master of its contents. But we have read the first half of it with considerable care, and, we must add, with very real respect tempered by amusement.

There can no question that Mr. Andrews has speculative ability, and a great deal of it. We have been struck with the sweep of his thought in certain directions, though not in all. He is certainly original, combining ideas of great value with a certain whimsical mysticism that will do much to prevent their examination by the best thinkers. The leading conception of his work is the reduction of all the sciences to one supreme science (which he designates by the barbarous hybrid term "Universology"), not by any sort of artificial dove-tailing, but by evolution from "three fundamental principles." It is evident that he is at work on the same general problem that has engaged the entire energy of such thinkers as Comte and Spencer. In some respects he sees farther than either of them, though on the whole equal to neither. His speculations remind us here and there of Pythagoras and A. J. Davis, Plato and Fourier, Boehme and Swedenborg and Hegel, in very odd fashion. That the elementary sounds of human speech naturally signify the elementary conceptions of this universal science, and that a new scientific language (Alwato) can be thus evolved as an illustrative model of the universe, is a main part of his theory; but the truth of this notion depends on the truth of "Universology" as a perfect cosmical philosophy, of which we are very far from being convinced. But after all deductions are made, we regard Mr. Andrews' volume as a remarkable work, well worthy the attention of speculative thinkers. Published by Dion Thomas, 141 Fulton St., New York. Price $1.50.
An announcement and review from two other places:

A Lucid Title-page.—Mr. Dion Thomas, of New York, announces a new work, of which the following is the title :—The Basic Outline of Universology : an introduction to the newly discovered science of the universe ; its elementary principles, and the stages of their development in the special sciences ; together with preliminary notices of Alwato, the newly-discovered scientific universal language, resulting from the principles of Universology. By Stephen Pearl Andrews, Member of the American Academy of Arts and Science, of the American Ethnological Society, &c. " God perpetually geometrizes." —Plato. Revelation through science; philosophy of integralism ; advent of the reconciliative harmony of ideas. With eighty illustrative diagrams. The price, 301.

And:

The Primary Synopsis of Universology and Alwato, the new Scientific Universal Language. By Stephen Pearl Andrews, member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, etc., etc. 13 mo. pp. xvi, 224 New York: Dion Thomas, 1871.

The attempt of Mr. Andrews to discover and promulgate a new science of sciences, or" a science of the universe itself," is certainly daring. The very pretension of having discovered such would, naturally, attract attention, while at the same time the boldness of the claim will excite ridicule. Yet such a claim, being put forward by one of highly respectable attainments, believed to be an honest and earnest thinker, is worthy of careful consideration. We may not flippantly reject what purports to be a revelation of all-important truth because it promises too much.

We think it was unfortunate for the acceptance of Mr. Andrews' philosophy that he was induced, contrary to his own judgment, to put forth this primary synopsis in advance of the complete exposition of his system. Such a theory, requiring thorough and abstruse philosophical demonstration, cannot well be popularized at once; it must be examined and accepted by the few—and they are very few—who are capable of comprehending it, before being presented to the many. When it is offered to the general public it must be in a diluted form and by those who know how to use the language of the people. Mr. Andrews, judging from this volume, is not the one to present new truths in such a garb as will secure the attention of the majority; but if he were so, it would furnish a reason for doubting his claims.

The terminology of this work is unique, and to many it will be repellant. From this it does not follow that the thought is not worthy of study. "It is the test of a solid thought that it will bear a change of clothing." Whatever is really valuable in this new philosophy will live and have its effect, however unusual or unattractive its garb. It may be that the thought in this book could not well be expressed in more popular style without interfering with its clearness and accuracy, as addressed to those who will be likely to comprehend it; but just here is the point of our objection to an attempt to popularize such high-climbing theories.

The greater part of the book is devoted to an exposition of a new universal language, which it is claimed has its foundations in nature and science. The style of demonstration is such that only those of boundless faith and indefatigable industry will be likely to attempt to master the principles here laid down. Be this as it may there is food for thought in the book, and we hope that the complete statement of the system will show it to possess valuable elements. The time and ability expended upon it ought certainly to produce some beneficial results.

:)
 
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