Bad Policies Keeping Down Good Ideas

Megalomaniac

Silver Meritorious Patron
I'm listening to Obama give a speech on education. I don't know if he knows what he's talking about, but he's talking about improving and reforming education. He's interested in new ideas and innovation. He mentioned charter schools ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charter_School ).

I'm reminded of the Delphian School, whose mission is to reform education. I think Delphi demonstrates some very good ideas.
  • Emphasis on students taking responsibility for their own education.
  • Morals.
  • Looking up words in the dictionary instead of just guessing what they mean.
  • Emphasis on application of the material, not just repeating it back for a test.
  • High literacy. Lots of reading.

You could say that Delphi is a front group for an evil cult. But that's an unfair simplification. I think Delphi delivers a good product. I have some criticisms, but I truly believe they set an example of some ideas that are worth considering when trying to reform an educational system. But it is true that Delphi is connected to the Church of Scientology. Applied Scholastics licenses Delphi. And many or all Delphi staff are Scientologists, some on their OT levels.

The point I'm trying to make is this. I am starting to think that the bad policies of the Church of Scientology are suppressive to organizations like the Delphian School. I'll give some examples of how this is, though I'm not very sure of them.

I assume Delphi has to pay some % to Applied Scholastics, and doesn't receive a fair exchange.

I heard (rumor) that Delphi publications need RTC approval, hence delaying publication.

KSW1 (no squirreling) puts an arbitrary on Delphi. They can't do real investigation into MU phenomena or anything else to more precisely understand it and improve study tech. All innovation has to work around the firm policies of LRH. They also can't seriously collaborate with some other educational institutions on such research without being in trouble for being connected with psychologists. They are stuck trying to showcase LRH instead of just using whatever tech from whatever source to deliver the best education.

The Sea Org's crummy reputation for education of children can unfairly ruin Delphi's reputation.

All atrocities of Scientology, which I believe stem from suppressive policies such as disconnection, can unfairly ruin Delphi's reputation.

For my part, I have been very shy about promoting Delphi. One reason was that I was ashamed of Scientology and I couldn't talk about Delphi without being prepared to explain who was LRH and hence, what is Scientology.

Delphi is put in a very awkward position regarding alumni or students who are critical of Scientology. ( :wave: Hello! :bow: ) Since they are Scientologists, they may be under pressure to disconnect. But they can't really state this policy publicly because it's crappy PR.

Do any of you think this is true?

Does the Church of Scientology International similarly suppress other activities under its control? For example, how much better off would The Way to Happiness Foundation be if TWTH were put in the public domain (not copyrighted) and they could operate independently?
 
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Veda

Sponsor
When the RTC took over Delphi, Martin Samuels, who had started Delphi years earlier, became an instant non-person. I was corresponding, at that time, with one of their staff, a Ph.D; he, and the other staff, at Delphi, expressed the view that they were 100% in agreement and delighted with the change. In reality, they were frightened sheep, sheep concerned with losing "their Bridge to Total Freedom." It was creepy, and I suspect that the same sheep-consciousness still prevails at Delphi to this day. Unfortunate.

TWTH Foundation was always a front group, or front function. If it were to be honest about its origin, its first step would be to admit, and describe (in the forward of TWTH booklet), the events that led L. Ron Hubbard to write (plagiarize?) this booklet: Some of Hubbard's confidential and immoral "Fair Game"-related writings had become public, due to court order, and there was a nasty PR problem to handle.

So, Hubbard wrote a booklet where he became the expert on morality, a booklet to be handed to school children, and to others, with advice such as, "Don't be promiscuous" or you might end up with "ground glass in the soup," etc.

TWTH booklet has the same stink attached to it as does Scientology's faux "Creed," written to forward the "religion angle"; or the PR essay 'What is Greatness?', written concurrent with the secret establishing of the Guardian's Office, and which gloats over the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

However, I do sympathize with your concern that the "good" of Scientology be salvaged. It's a dilemma.
 

Dulloldfart

Squirrel Extraordinaire
Delphi is put in a very awkward position regarding alumni or students who are critical of Scientology. ( :wave: Hello! :bow: ) Since they are Scientologists, they may be under pressure to disconnect. But they can't really state this policy publicly because it's crappy PR.

Do any of you think this is true?

Of course. I don't see any real difference between an individual Scio who has extensive family and business connections in the cult and Delphi, except Delphi is far bigger than one individual and has far more connections through all the individuals involved.

I don't know how easy it would be to break away administratively. If the current contracts they have regarding the staff and students say that they will continue to uphold the status quo then it would be real hard. If Delphi suddenly said that they will break away from the CofS in, say, one year's time to give everyone concerned enough time to make other plans, maybe that announcement all by itself would violate the contracts they have in place.

Paul
 

Megalomaniac

Silver Meritorious Patron
When the RTC took over Delphi, Martin Samuels, who had started Delphi years earlier, became an instant non-person. I was corresponding, at that time, with one of their staff, a Ph.D; he, and the other staff, at Delphi, expressed the view that they were 100% in agreement and delighted with the change. In reality, they were frightened sheep, sheep concerned with losing "their Bridge to Total Freedom." It was creepy, and I suspect that the same sheep-consciousness still prevails at Delphi to this day. Unfortunate.

Sheep? With regards to the Church of Scientology, yes, they follow like good sheep. With regards to education, they lead.

I can only name one Ph.D at Delphi in 1982, though there probably were a few.

TWTH Foundation was always a front group, or front function. If it were to be honest about its origin, its first step would be to admit, and describe (in the forward of TWTH booklet), the events that led L. Ron Hubbard to write (plagiarize?) this booklet: Some of Hubbard's confidential and immoral "Fair Game"-related writings had become public, due to court order, and there was a nasty PR problem to handle.

So, Hubbard wrote a booklet where he became the expert on morality, a booklet to be handed to school children, and to others, with advice such as, "Don't be promiscuous" or you might end up with "ground glass in the soup," etc.

TWTH booklet has the same stink attached to it as does Scientology's faux "Creed," written to forward the "religion angle"; or the PR essay 'What is Greatness?', written concurrent with the secret establishing of the Guardian's Office, and which gloats over the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

Granted, it's hypocritical. Perhaps it's plagiarized. But I still consider it well written. For most or all of the precepts, it gives reasons WHY they should be followed, and presents them humbly as suggestions. This is in contrast to other moral codes and Scientology itself.

I think it's still worth distributing and I'm sure others agree. To forward that purpose, an organization would naturally form anyways. I'm just thinking, that it need not be an organization dominated by CoS.

However, I do sympathize with your concern that the "good" of Scientology be salvaged. It's a dilemma.

I'm not just thinking of the good of Scientology. I'm thinking of the Delphian School in particular. They have constructed their curriculum almost from scratch. They have years of working with an innovative study system, figuring it out, working out the bugs. Much of this THEY created. They are the source, not LRH. Sure, they quote LRH as the basis for a lot of it, but they could as well quote many other philosophers for some of the same ideas. I'm thinking about getting Delphi out from under the control of CoS. If they WANT to be affiliated, fine. But it should be a relationship of fair exchange, not one dominating the other. And in this case, I think Delphi gives back to Scientology way more than it receives.
 

Megalomaniac

Silver Meritorious Patron
Hey Paul!

Did you kick Grundy out of his space ship? Nice hat, though.

Wait a minute? Did Emma trap you in Grundy's space ship? Do you need help?


Of course.

I feel dumb. This is obvious, huh? Well, I'm just thinking about this in a different angle, but it's the same story for everyone: removing the undue authoritarian control.

I don't see any real difference between an individual Scio who has extensive family and business connections in the cult and Delphi, except Delphi is far bigger than one individual and has far more connections through all the individuals involved.

Yep.

I don't know how easy it would be to break away administratively. If the current contracts they have regarding the staff and students say that they will continue to uphold the status quo then it would be real hard. If Delphi suddenly said that they will break away from the CofS in, say, one year's time to give everyone concerned enough time to make other plans, maybe that announcement all by itself would violate the contracts they have in place.

Paul

I hadn't thought of the contracts as such. Well, contracts can be re-negotiated. And if one entity is not acting in good faith, perhaps they can be nullified.

I'm looking at the unfairness ("out-exchange") aspect of this. Suppose there are 1000 students in all the Delphi Schools, and each pays an average of $10,000 tuition per year. I know it's closer to $30,000 in Oregon, but there are a lot of staff children and the other schools are not boarding, so, $10,000 is in the ball park. Suppose Applied Scholastics takes 10%.

1000 x $10,000/year x 10% = $1,000,000/year

What does Delphi get for that $1,000,000?

Another way to look at it, if you're a parent paying $30,000. What do you get for the $3000 that went up to Scientology? Is your child $3000 smarter than if Delphi didn't have to pay that?

It looks to me like a big criminal-exchange situation.

I'm going on very little knowledge, and I'm hoping some of you could answer /verify the following:
  • Applied Scholastics demands %10 of the GI of its schools.
  • What does Applied Scholastics give back to those schools, besides licensing rights?
 

Dulloldfart

Squirrel Extraordinaire
It looks to me like a big criminal-exchange situation.

I'm going on very little knowledge, and I'm hoping some of you could answer /verify the following:
  • Applied Scholastics demands %10 of the GI of its schools.
  • What does Applied Scholastics give back to those schools, besides licensing rights?

Of course. :)

I would imagine that the staff at Delphi would want ApS to have the least possible contact with them, hopefully none at all, beyond the extorted 10% (?) that they probably look on as part of the cost of doing business. Just like paying taxes or bribing the authorities in certain countries. Do you honestly think there are people at ApS who know more about the real business of educating students than the staff at Delphi?

I can't verify the 10%. I don't know. 10% of GI (not CGI) is a huge chunk of a business.

Paul
 

Megalomaniac

Silver Meritorious Patron
Do you honestly think there are people at ApS who know more about the real business of educating students than the staff at Delphi?

Not at all. I was a student there for 7 years. I never saw anyone from Applied Scholastics or any other organization do any kind of Qual or anything at all.

Of course, supervisors went to Scientology churches for Supervisor and other training. But I'm sure that was paid for separately.

But that's my point. Delphi staff are the authorities, in comparison to ApS executives. Delphi is one of the main forces that holds up whatever good reputation ApS has, not the other way around.

I've never heard anyone say, "hmmm, I wonder if Delphi is any good. Oh! They are an Applied Scholastics school. Therefore, Delphi is good."

But Delphi, itself, does have a fairly good reputation, which it has earned. (my opinion)
 

Dulloldfart

Squirrel Extraordinaire
But that's my point. Delphi staff are the authorities, in comparison to ApS executives. Delphi is one of the main forces that holds up whatever good reputation ApS has, not the other way around.

I've never heard anyone say, "hmmm, I wonder if Delphi is any good. Oh! They are an Applied Scholastics school. Therefore, Delphi is good."

But Delphi, itself, does have a fairly good reputation, which it has earned. (my opinion)

Maybe ApS should pay Delphi 10%. :)

Paul
 

airhead

Patron with Honors
My kids were in Delphi, and I'm glad they are out. The emphasis on "perfect behavior" was over the top.
 

Megalomaniac

Silver Meritorious Patron
My kids were in Delphi, and I'm glad they are out. The emphasis on "perfect behavior" was over the top.

Hi Airhead,

I'm embarrassed.

You are not the only one with such a story. I know what you are talking about. My experience there was very good, probably because most of their efforts to get me to "behave" were not done in a demeaning way. To me, they were encouraging. But I know of others who were treated as failures.

I welcome your criticism. If you have more to say, you may post it here, or even PM me. At some point, the folks at Delphi should hear it, too. I truly believe they want to make a good school and are interested in correcting themselves.

I am very pro-Delphi. But I do have my own criticisms. Their purpose is to revolutionize education. But with the high tuition, and high staff/teacher-student ratio, it's not really an example that can be compared to ordinary schools. Also, Delphi rejects or kicks out many students for all kinds of reasons. Again, this is not a luxury that most public schools have. Delphi Oregon is well removed physically from the outside world, and they can control the environment. This is great for keeping drugs out, but it's not practical most places. To really set an example that other schools could follow, you'd have to do it with the budget and personnel and students and environment found in an ordinary community.

Still, I think they successfully demonstrate some educational methods that I haven't seen elsewhere. I think they have something to offer.

More comments, please. :yes: :thankyou:
 
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