Bare-Faced Messiah Going Back Into Print

Danger Mouse

Patron with Honors
"Messiah or Madman" had a lot of good things in it, but it was totally disorganized. The title reminded me of the old American Legion films, "Communism: Threat or Menace?" Maybe he was neither a messiah nor a madman. Well, he's stuck with the title if he reprints it, but if they reprint the book, I hope they put it into some kind of logical sequence.

"Bare Faced Messiah" is well-organized. I believe that Miller is the first person who actually talked to Hubbard's aunts and his childhood neighbors in Montana. A very professional work. The glaring omission is that he never mentions Hubbard's uncle, Elbert, or explores the relationship between Elbert and his adopted brother, L. Ron's dad. Did L. Ron want to be a world famous author because of his uncle's fame? Did his dad discourage him because he resented Elbert's success? Or maybe the whole thing was another of L. Ron's lies. Elbert is almost forgotten today, but he was a big celebrity a century ago.
 

Veda

Sponsor
"Messiah or Madman" had a lot of good things in it, but it was totally disorganized. The title reminded me of the old American Legion films, "Communism: Threat or Menace?" Maybe he was neither a messiah nor a madman. Well, he's stuck with the title if he reprints it, but if they reprint the book, I hope they put it into some kind of logical sequence.


Reading Messiah or Madman? by Emma:

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthre...quot&p=1827&highlight=meddiah+madman#post1827

The 1987 first edition was rushed to print due to legal threats and pressures. There is also a revised and updated and expanded 1992 edition, and a further revised and updated and expanded 1996 edition. The version on the Net is a crude 1998 scan of the 1987 first edition.

The book was not, primarily, presented chronologically, but by topics. For example, there are those who are puzzled as to why the 3rd chapter L. Ron and the Beast (about the Crowley connection and Hubbard's drug use) is in the section of chapters covering the Sea Org. The quick answer is because it is relevant to that time period, despite it apparent incongruity.

Some chapters are like large footnotes, and the formatting is unconventional, as is the intent of the book - read the earlier 'book flap" material for some idea of what that was.

The same with the Brainwashing Manual chapter that is also in the Sea Org section of chapters. Why would a chapter about something written in 1955 be in a section of chapters concerning events of the late 1960s and 1970s? That, I hope, is evident as the reader progresses. It certainly was evident to me and to others.

It was not going to be a conventional book, even if it had not been rushed to print in the first edition.

It complements Bare Faced Messiah. They are not in competition.

And, from what I've heard, both books have helped a lot of people.


"Bare Faced Messiah" is well-organized. I believe that Miller is the first person who actually talked to Hubbard's aunts and his childhood neighbors in Montana. A very professional work. The glaring omission is that he never mentions Hubbard's uncle, Elbert, or explores the relationship between Elbert and his adopted brother, L. Ron's dad. Did L. Ron want to be a world famous author because of his uncle's fame? Did his dad discourage him because he resented Elbert's success? Or maybe the whole thing was another of L. Ron's lies. Elbert is almost forgotten today, but he was a big celebrity a century ago.

Barefaced Messiah is the only actual biography of all the books about Scientology and Hubbard. It's beautifully done; however, its purpose and, to some extent, its audience, is very different than that of Messiah or Madman?
 
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CommunicatorIC

@IndieScieNews on Twitter
Jonathan Turley re: Bare-Faced Messiah Going Back Into Print

Jonathan Turley has a good post on this. Read it all at his blog.

Scientology Book Published In United States After 27 Years
http://jonathanturley.org/2014/04/07/scientology-3/

Excerpt:
There is an interesting story about this month that shows the success of the Church of Scientology in pursuing its signature litigation abuse by hitting critics with lawsuits and injunction motions. One of the chief targets of Scientology lawyers has been “Bare-Faced Messiah: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard,” a British book that has been hounded by the Church in an alleged attempt to keep it out of the United States. If that was the motivation, it worked for 27 years. However, that book has now been published in print this month in the United States and joins “Going Clear” by Lawrence Wright as a “new” account of the life and controversies surrounding Hubbard’s life and creation of his own religion.
 
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