Dissecting the new Mark 8 E-Meter updater software

Freeminds

Bitter defrocked apostate
How would we go about ensuring that the new, allegedly improved version VIII of the eMeter gets the FDA sticker displayed in accordance with the ruling, ie somewhere visible on the casing and not hidden away on the bottom. If this is the "new" eMeter than the cult have had plenty of time to redesign the casing to accommodate the warning sticker, as they are mandated to do.

2. Each E-meter shall bear the following warning, printed in 11-point leaded type,
permanently affixed to the front of the E-meter so that it is clearly visible when
the E-meter is used, sold or distributed:

The E-meter is not medically or scientifically useful for the diagnosis,
treatment or prevention of any disease. It is not medically or scientifically
capable of improving the health or bodily functions of anyone.

Paging Graham Berry...
 

Anonycat

Crusader
How would we go about ensuring that the new, allegedly improved version VIII of the eMeter gets the FDA sticker displayed in accordance with the ruling, ie somewhere visible on the casing and not hidden away on the bottom. If this is the "new" eMeter than the cult have had plenty of time to redesign the casing to accommodate the warning sticker, as they are mandated to do.



Paging Graham Berry...

I noticed that too.
 

Panda Termint

Cabal Of One
That's the old Azimuth meter, Anonycat! How cool were they?
Someone obviously pasted something over the glass back but it's supposed to be look-thru! :)
 

Anonycat

Crusader
That's the old Asimuth meter, Anonycat! How cool were they?
Someone obviously pasted something over the glass back but it's supposed to be look-thru! :)

Right! The see-through meter was to accommodate an auditor. This way they could tape a list behind it, and by doing so, no reads are missed. So goes the tale.
 

Panda Termint

Cabal Of One
Right! The see-through meter was to accommodate an auditor. This way they could tape a list behind it, and by doing so, no reads are missed. So goes the tale.
Well, actually, my understanding of it was that you could either read a list thru it or see the worksheets as you were writing. Delta made them from '65 to '70 according to my research. I know someone who still has one. You didn't tape the list to it, you just read thru it.
 

Ogsonofgroo

Crusader
How would we go about ensuring that the new, allegedly improved version VIII of the eMeter gets the FDA sticker displayed in accordance with the ruling, ie somewhere visible on the casing and not hidden away on the bottom. If this is the "new" eMeter than the cult have had plenty of time to redesign the casing to accommodate the warning sticker, as they are mandated to do.



Paging Graham Berry...

Hm, is that only the meters seen in public should ha the warning labels? ~ Shouldn't every one of them (US) have one? From what I have read they all should, and since none do, it must be a clear violation of federal laws, something the wee one has missed...>>*ohhellotonyoetalia*
HM, WONDER WHY CULT HASN'T COMPLIED WITH THIS?

sry, caps loc eror # 0707...

:shrug:
 

Anonycat

Crusader
Well, actually, my understanding of it was that you could either read a list thru it or see the worksheets as you were writing. Delta made them from '65 to '70 according to my research. I know someone who still has one. You didn't tape the list to it, you just read thru it.

Exactly. :)
 

PTS

Elliott
I beleive when you get it fully dissected that you will find that ...

It follows you around the net.

It checks everything on your computer (entheta sniffer software)

It reads your emails whether on your computer or at your ISP.

It checks credit ratings.

It checks CC acct. balances when you do online payments.

It checks your bank balance.

It finds out who all your friends are on facebook.

It toggles the e-meter to off or gives it a virus if membership is not up to date.

It lets them know if you are home or not.

It has GPS.

Add any dirty thing you can think of, they have no respect.

One could be forgiven for thinking that the NSA is behind it. :eyeroll:
Which came first, NSA or OSA? :confused2:
 

Dulloldfart

Squirrel Extraordinaire
Well, actually, my understanding of it was that you could either read a list thru it or see the worksheets as you were writing. Delta made them from '65 to '70 according to my research. I know someone who still has one. You didn't tape the list to it, you just read thru it.

I used to have one while in the SO at Saint Hill. I even got it silver-certed and used it a few times for word-clearing in the AO. I left it behind when I moved to LA and it got lost in some flood or fire or whatever.

Paul
 

Jump

Operating teatime
One could be forgiven for thinking that the NSA is behind it. :eyeroll:
Which came first, NSA or OSA? :confused2:



1372275477357796.jpg


 

Dweeb

Patron
- Chrome.pak is basically the embedded chrome browser project. The project is pretty much open source, with the resource collection commonly modified for different platforms. Its a bit late at night to be digging through 7k lines of code to look for edits but on a quick browse through looks kinda standard chrome. It carries an apple copyright purely because it uses some appl api's to make chrome mac os compatible. There is a separate mac download - which funnily enough is twice the size.

- The sites it accesses - akamai provide content delivery for like 20% or so of the whole internet including facebook, twitter, the white house etc etc etc. At a guess c of s uses them for hosting, so the software checks back for updates etc. the 1e100.com address is a little more interesting, thats google ^^ no idea what its accessing there although there are plenty of plausible reasons to doing so.

- npm8detector.dll does just what it says on the packet - detects if your emeter is plugged into the computer or not.

- nothing in the registry entries that I would be concerned about personally, only real interesting part of those is how many are actually unnecessary for it to operate on win7. Given that it was written for the DotNet 2 framework its kinda old and clunky, I'd be inclined to write off some of the more obscure registry keys and the creation of an autoexec.bat as compatibility for older versions of windows originally built in when the software was first written many moons ago. The older version of visual c++ used to code it, along with the runtimes being included in the package, and all that legacy compatibility makes for a bigger file package, not to mention the coding isnt uber efficient...all those bytes add up.....

- adding to the file size is the all the stuff for dr watson added in (dw20.exe). The doc was an error reporting / diagnostic tool that was part of an old version of office (xp or 2k3?), harmless but buggy as all hell on win7, had a few lockups from older software trying to get dr watson running.

To be honest the size of the install is mostly just bloat from old legacy crap no longer needed and poor coding The dotnet 2 framework this was written for dates to like 2005/2006ish so theres a lot of unneeded stuff added in for support for every windows version from win95 onwards. Any license expiry date info is probably on the firmware for the meter itself couldnt see anything in the stuff provided in the thread for it
 

DamOTclese

New Member
One enters one's customer number, and then the Winsock library -- good grief! -- is used to send information "back home" presumably so that the Scientology crooks can bill the rubes for using the software every time. Would not surprise me in the least if the crooks bill the suckers every time it phones home.
 

AnonKat

Crusader
One enters one's customer number, and then the Winsock library -- good grief! -- is used to send information "back home" presumably so that the Scientology crooks can bill the rubes for using the software every time. Would not surprise me in the least if the crooks bill the suckers every time it phones home.

Welcome, your Avatar frightens me, but I supose that is very very close to how you felt inside the cult
 

suspiciousperson

Patron with Honors
I haven't read the full thread but if the OP is accurately representative of the thread then the people "dissecting" this have about as much expertise as if I would if I were to disect a human body, and proclaim that they had cancer because there was a big green lumpy bit.

To be completely clear when I say OP, I am not talking about CJ, I am talking about his summary of the WWP thread.
 

suspiciousperson

Patron with Honors
- Chrome.pak is basically the embedded chrome browser project. The project is pretty much open source, with the resource collection commonly modified for different platforms. Its a bit late at night to be digging through 7k lines of code to look for edits but on a quick browse through looks kinda standard chrome. It carries an apple copyright purely because it uses some appl api's to make chrome mac os compatible. There is a separate mac download - which funnily enough is twice the size.

- The sites it accesses - akamai provide content delivery for like 20% or so of the whole internet including facebook, twitter, the white house etc etc etc. At a guess c of s uses them for hosting, so the software checks back for updates etc. the 1e100.com address is a little more interesting, thats google ^^ no idea what its accessing there although there are plenty of plausible reasons to doing so.

- npm8detector.dll does just what it says on the packet - detects if your emeter is plugged into the computer or not.

- nothing in the registry entries that I would be concerned about personally, only real interesting part of those is how many are actually unnecessary for it to operate on win7. Given that it was written for the DotNet 2 framework its kinda old and clunky, I'd be inclined to write off some of the more obscure registry keys and the creation of an autoexec.bat as compatibility for older versions of windows originally built in when the software was first written many moons ago. The older version of visual c++ used to code it, along with the runtimes being included in the package, and all that legacy compatibility makes for a bigger file package, not to mention the coding isnt uber efficient...all those bytes add up.....

- adding to the file size is the all the stuff for dr watson added in (dw20.exe). The doc was an error reporting / diagnostic tool that was part of an old version of office (xp or 2k3?), harmless but buggy as all hell on win7, had a few lockups from older software trying to get dr watson running.

To be honest the size of the install is mostly just bloat from old legacy crap no longer needed and poor coding The dotnet 2 framework this was written for dates to like 2005/2006ish so theres a lot of unneeded stuff added in for support for every windows version from win95 onwards. Any license expiry date info is probably on the firmware for the meter itself couldnt see anything in the stuff provided in the thread for it

Or what this guy said.
 
Well, actually, my understanding of it was that you could either read a list thru it or see the worksheets as you were writing. Delta made them from '65 to '70 according to my research. I know someone who still has one. You didn't tape the list to it, you just read thru it.
You sure about that? I thought Delta started building meters in the 70's in California, and that MK IV and the white MkV's were made in England. I used to have the English MK V Leonard Cohen abandoned in an apartment he lived in back in NYC, and like the idiot I sometimes am, I sent it into pubs to be certed, and they took off the original TA counter which worked fine and substituted the later version. Then my daughter took it to course and left it in the org, never to be seen again. Sigh. I'll bet it'd be worth a pretty penny now if I wasn't so foolish.

Mimsey
 
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