Education and Study as Practiced in Scientology

Mark, I simply ask the questions, get the answers, and start and stop the session. What the person views is their business, not mine. I never indoctrinate anyone to look for past lives, and it's never happened that they've found them, and yet their "case condition" seems to resolve without viewing anything like that.

I don't think that the being IS their body, I just don't believe they existed prior to the body, or that they will exist when the body ceases providing the computing environment.

The materialist dicta is that mental states of being are an emergent phenomena of the physical processes of the body. They begin as a result of the bodies processes, and terminate accordingly. To attempt to draw a distinction between the "being" and the "body" in such a formalism is ludicrous.

The alternate view that being arises from spirit and that spiritual phenomena interact with physical processes through as yet undetermined means stands in contrast to the emergent phenomena paradigm. It draws a clear distinction which can be experienced subjectively and thereby demonstrated. It doesn't conform to the materialist model, hence materialist approaches to empiricism are insufficient for addressing the prospective truth of the paradigm.

You pays your money and you take your choice.


Mark A. Baker
 

uniquemand

Unbeliever
The materialist dicta is that mental states of being are an emergent phenomena of the physical processes of the body. They begin as a result of the bodies processes, and terminate accordingly. To attempt to draw a distinction between the "being" and the "body" in such a formalism is ludicrous.

The alternate view that being arises from spirit and that spiritual phenomena interact with physical processes through as yet undetermined means stands in contrast to the emergent phenomena paradigm. It draws a clear distinction which can be experienced subjectively and thereby demonstrated. It doesn't conform to the materialist model, hence materialist approaches to empiricism are insufficient for addressing the prospective truth of the paradigm.

You pays your money and you take your choice.


Mark A. Baker

The difference, Mark, is not ludicrous. It's similar to a computer, IMO, in that the computer is not the software. The software may be tied to the computer, but a computer can exist without software, and the software can be written on paper, and never put into a computer. It still comes down, ultimately, to something that is undefined, I simply choose the solution that doesn't introduce unnecessary variables.
 

lkwdblds

Crusader
I like the computer and software analogy

The difference, Mark, is not ludicrous. It's similar to a computer, IMO, in that the computer is not the software. The software may be tied to the computer, but a computer can exist without software, and the software can be written on paper, and never put into a computer. It still comes down, ultimately, to something that is undefined, I simply choose the solution that doesn't introduce unnecessary variables.

Uniquemand - I really like your computer and software analogy. The computer hardware and the software can both exist independently of each other. Though existing, the software can accomplish nothing and probably the computer can do nothing constructive either. When the software is installed then the computer can perform many useful functions.

Still, some outside source has to feed data into the computer via the software, pose questions for the computer to answer and study and interpret the computer's output to make some sort of sense of the answers.

This is the classic Thetan, mind, body, product situation covered well by Hubbard. The product is the computer"s answers, usually in printed or graph form. The computer hardware is the body, the software is the mind and the being who entered the input into the computer and interpreted the results is the thetan or spirit or whatever you want to call it.

In today's institutes of education, from kindergarten to Graduate School, and especially in most Graduate Schools, if one believes there is a something directing the show, independent of a body, you are laughed out of town.
The body and mind are merged and considered as one under the title of "body". The Brain is considered to be the mind. Instead of a thetan, mind, body, product system they teach it as a "brain part of the body", "non brain part of the body", and then "product". or just a body, product system.
This is what your enormous amounts of money buy for your children, enormous student loans and debt but the kid graduated from Yale, Harvard or Stanford and is automatically considered a "success", commanding a high salary right from the get go. The graduate is often aloof and looks down on others going to normal colleges, such as Cal-State at Northridege or Idaho State or something such as those, as almost uneducated and both socially and intellectually inferior to him or her.

This might be an oversimplifaction but it definitely contains a lot of truths.
Lakey
 
Last edited:
The difference, Mark, is not ludicrous. It's similar to a computer, IMO, in that the computer is not the software. The software may be tied to the computer, but a computer can exist without software, and the software can be written on paper, and never put into a computer.

There is no evidence to support this analogy in lifeforms. Software is separable from the processor on which it runs. The same is not true of the materialist paradigm of mental function. It is however true of the spiritual paradigm. :)


It still comes down, ultimately, to something that is undefined, I simply choose the solution that doesn't introduce unnecessary variables.

Actually, the choice has a distinct preference for hidden variables. It also ignores subjective reality which, incidentally, is the ONLY reality an intelligent being ever experiences though existence as a body. :)


Mark A. Baker
 

Ted

Gold Meritorious Patron
From another thread, this one posted here for Lakey...

In answer to Terril's curiosity, this is Ted's current position on scientology, short form:

To paraphrase an old Hubbard quote, it is easy to lift a person up because you have his help; it is difficult to hold him down.

The word "tech" still disgusts me. It is LRH's pretentious positioning with science. The only way I can stomach it is in reference to technique; that would be communication and perceptual techniques designed to help the client/pc live better--in his own estimation. Then it makes sense.

Grade Zero is still the OT Grade with all other Grades being in support. The Bridge should be circular similar to the diagram of the Eight Dynamics with Grade Zero in the center.

I believe in clearing if we say it is helping a person get his thoughts and feelings in order. A little of this goes a long way. Subjective processes need to be run with lots of objective processes. The old 20/10 technique was on the right track. That's 20 minutes subjective/10 minutes objective processing for the duration of the intensive.

The next big case booster is open discussion, not permitted in scientology. The internet facilitates that. The next gradient is face-to-face. Some, if not many, people can't physically tolerate the emotion of face-to-face discussion and origination. Lots of people are still hiding, can't even lurk without feeling guilty. I know because I was at first.

Auditor-pc two-way communication is typically not two-way; it is one-way. When friends or associates come for help or a sympathetic ear I often ask, "Do you want me to just listen or do you want some feedback?"

Many years ago I grew weary of helping a client/pc clean his slate only to have life or the organization write on it before he could. As soon as possible, a client/pc should get an answer to some such question as, "What has been your main purpose in life?" or "What are you trying to accomplish?" The answers can change as time marches on. Auditing programs and directions then support the client, not the organization.

Hubbard said some good things. I particularly enjoy the basic auditing skills. Unfortunately, he left a mess of scientology with his self-importance and self-interest imbedded in the subject. If I need to separate him out with a crowbar, I will, and do publicly.

That's the short answer to your curiosity. :coolwink:
 
The word "tech" still disgusts me. It is LRH's pretentious positioning with science. The only way I can stomach it is in reference to technique; that would be communication and perceptual techniques designed to help the client/pc live better--in his own estimation. Then it makes sense.

Your interpretation is more closely related to "technology" than is any identification with science. The existence of technologies as disciplined practices long predates the development of any empirical formalisms developed with the intent of determining the functioning of natural mechanisms.

Deriving from greek it basically means the study of skills. Much of human technology is derived from no more than "good operating practice" expressed as "rules of thumb" and derived from lengthy practice. The advent of newer gadgets developed using modern physics doesn't really change this.

Thus, personally I have no problem with referring to the subject of scientology as a technology, although I definitely refuse to call it a science.


Mark A. Baker
 

Ted

Gold Meritorious Patron
Excellent Advice -- Not Scn as Practiced by Many

Best Parenting Tips gleaned from Project Gifted blog spot:

http://blog.projectgifted.com/2009/10/12/best-parenting-tip-we-have-a-winner/

"Imagine that I come to you and tell you: "I have a job for you. You're gonna be in charge of the emotional, physical, spiritual and physical development of a human being." What would you say to that? Most people don't realize that parenting is a profession, and it's a really important one. Your kids are creating beliefs everyday and you have to make sure that the beliefs that they have are the ones that make them successful, healthy human beings." -- Shelly

Melissa Greczy, the blog spot owner, writes, "We had 5 finalists who got the most votes from you guys. Scroll down to read their tips before we reveal to you the winner."

#1. Bodie: "Challenge their mind-Encourage their dreams-Support their health-Treat them with respect-Laugh with ‘em till it hurts-Love them unconditionally-EVERYDAY."

#2. Traci: "Everyday as they go out the door to school, tell them you love them. Every night as they go to bed, tell them you love them. You can never tell a child that you love them too much."

#3. Liesl: "Love without spoiling, provide without neglecting, discipline without degrading, & most of all, accept & allow them to be who they are without judgement & with boundaries."

#4. Dalia: "Treat everyone the way you want to be treated."

#5. Rod Hammer: "Master these two things: listen, really listen, to everything they share, and never ever forget what it felt like to be a child."

So after lots and lots of deliberating, we have selected the winner!

Are you ready?

And the winner is...

parenting-tip-winner.png
 

lkwdblds

Crusader
Thanks Ted for posting this wonderful advice

Thanks Ted for posting all the contest entries and the winner. What study could be more important than the study of how to properly raise children?
Lakey
 

lkwdblds

Crusader
Good to hear from you Zinj

Maybe Marty can help you with that :)

Zinj

Good to hear from you Zinj, I was beginning to think this thread had run its course and was coming to an end. This is a shame because the quality of the posts here is as good or better than I have seen on any other thread.

With you finally posting here and Mark Baker and Looker engaging in a little playfull jousting, maybe the thread still has some life left in it. I sure hope so. So much vital information of education and study has been posted here and Roger B. has a major book on the subject. There is so much more going on than what goes on in a Scientology Academy or a current public school for that matter. Education is a vital subject with a lot happening, much, much more than I knew about when I start the thread. More info needs to get out to the public at large on all the real breakthroughs being made in education.
Lakey
 

Zinjifar

Silver Meritorious Sponsor
Well, to tell you the truth, although I can think of any number of 'tricks' and 'game plans' that could improve 'education', including some that might be similar to Scientology's tendentious 'Study Tech', my major problem with the education system is the system itself. I think there are lots of valuable techniques that could be used, but, I would prefer that for any public education, graduates of 'Schools of Education' or those with 'credentials' should be excluded. Current 'systems' seem most interested in the career paths of teachers and elevating them to 'administration'.

I had very good experiences in Catholic Schools growing up, (and some very bad) but what *most* appealed to me was at the high school level with the large number of non-credentialed 'educators' who were actually there on a non-career basis while working towards something else. I felt the same way about most of the teachers I ran into doing various Junior College scenes.

I was a lot less impressed with the 'professional' teachers my son had in public schools or the ones I had in 'Universities'.

Zinj
 

lkwdblds

Crusader
Astute post

Well, to tell you the truth, although I can think of any number of 'tricks' and 'game plans' that could improve 'education', including some that might be similar to Scientology's tendentious 'Study Tech', my major problem with the education system is the system itself. I think there are lots of valuable techniques that could be used, but, I would prefer that for any public education, graduates of 'Schools of Education' or those with 'credentials' should be excluded. Current 'systems' seem most interested in the career paths of teachers and elevating them to 'administration'.

I had very good experiences in Catholic Schools growing up, (and some very bad) but what *most* appealed to me was at the high school level with the large number of non-credentialed 'educators' who were actually there on a non-career basis while working towards something else. I felt the same way about most of the teachers I ran into doing various Junior College scenes.

I was a lot less impressed with the 'professional' teachers my son had in public schools or the ones I had in 'Universities'.

Zinj

Quite a long post for you Zinj! You are a master of the one or two liners.

I was going to be a high school Math teacher and took education courses in college. These were the worst courses I ever took. The teachers who taught these courses were idiots. One guy just sat on the corner of his desk and read right from the text book in a boring, sleep inducing drone, for nearly the whole hour. At the end of the period, after a horn went off, he wrote out a homework assignment as we filed out the door.

The curriculum was a mystery to me, I use to lie in bed at night and try and remember what was being taught. There was some "great" educator named John Dewey. who lived in the 19th century and had something to do with the Dewey Decimal system in use in libraries and we just memorized various dates when he did something. That was about it. The only thing which I remeber we were taught was something called Gestalt. It was introduced without ever being defined and I had no idea what it meant nearly 50 years ago and no idea what it means today. I used to look it up in a dictionary before every test and yet I never could remember what it meant.

The only thing of any value which I learned in my education classes was the math portion where the bell shaped curve was studied and the mean and standard deviation were defined. I was a Math major and enjoyed having an objective subject to learn about for a change but 95% of the students were liberal arts majors and had trouble understanding the math. The only other thing even remotely useful was learning how to set up a film projector or slide projector back in the days when films were shown in the class room.

My teachers at the Junior College level were simply outstanding! However, this was mostly in Math and Science. I did have two absolutely fantastic English professors whom I learned a lot from and also a very good male teacher in a class about health and nutrition of the human body.

Moving up to the 4 year University, UCLA, it was mostly a bunch of stuffed shirts. These guys did know their subjects well but knew almost nothing about teaching methods and what is more, they didn't want to know. They felt that the subject should be difficult and hard to understand and that only by hard study and dilligence would the cream of the crop pass the course. To them it was a good sign if a high percentage of the class failed. That showed them that they were doing a good job because they felt only a small percentage of the students had the smarts to pass. I would say that maybe 10 % got A's and 20% B's. A grade of C was almost considered a fail at this level and maybe 40% got C and the last 30% got D or failed.

I feel that with excellent teaching methods, maybe 35% A and 40% B and 25% C was achievable with no grade lower than C being given.

Most of the classes were given by Teaching aids, these were graduate students who made extra money filling in for the actual professors giving the lectures and grading the tests. The only time a real professor taught, it was in a large lecture hall of maybe 300 students. The professor didn't know who any of the students were and spoke with a microphone. The text book was usually written by the professor himself and though usually cordial and somewhat friendly, making little jokes, they were quite pompous and arrogant and thought that they were really superior enlightened beings when in reality most of them were not. Maybe a handful of them were what you could call great men or men of letters. In the UCLA Engineering school of !959-60, 50 years ago, none of the professors were females although a couple of the students were. I am sure times have changed now and the sexual mix would be different but I doubt if the pompous arrogant attitudes have changed.
Lakey
 
Last edited:

RogerB

Crusader
OK, Lakey, This Should Tickle Your Fancy!

OK, Lakey, this should get you going a little:yes:

Below is part of a paper my Sweet Virginia wrote as a requirement for gaining her Montessori Teaching Certification.

Maria Montessori was an Italian M.D. who made some brilliant observations on the subject of child development and education -- this some 8-90 years ago. She developed what she discovered into what has since become a worldwide organization of schools and accredited teachers. Her methods have particular and vital importance to the young child in the pre-school to junior high school levels.

Because of my interest in the works of Rudolph Steiner and his Waldorf Education methods (V and I cite both these great trail-blazers in our book--I introduced V to works of both these thinkers) V decided to do her required paper on Steiner's Waldorf system and how it could be aligned with and applied as part of the Montessori school scenario. (I have not included the part dealing with the combo of the two as it is hypothetical and a little more academic than even the first commentary part.)

V and I spent a day up-state a few weeks ago at a leading Waldorf school as part of her research.

You'll note the observation of Steiner that the development of a child goes through certain different stages. Also note that the whole premise of the philosophy of Waldorf education is that of working with the child . . . to help the child achieve all that is best for and native to the child. It is not a system that thinks it knows best for the child and thus rams crap down the child's throat.

Here is V's sweet little document . . . .

Receive the children with reverence,
Educate them in love,
Send them forth in freedom.
Rudolf Steiner



Waldorf Educational Philosophy
Children need to be engaged in three distinct ways – through the head, heart and hands. This is the primary educational paradigm of Waldorf education. Rather than focus the educational work solely around the objective of acquiring knowledge, creating a meaningful learning process itself becomes the focus. Through multi-faceted, multi-sensory learning experiences, teachers and students use a variety of intelligences to develop three distinct capacities – for thinking, for feeling and for intentional, purposeful activity.

Waldorf schools are concerned with the development of the whole child. The Waldorf curriculum exposes students to a wide variety of subjects, encouraging them to develop in a well-balanced way. Efforts to lead children to fullness must be concerned with helping children develop the ability to separate what they feel from what they do. Education should be based on the understanding that for young children their impulse for activity is intricately connected with their feelings.

Self-discipline is the ability “to do the right thing”. A key element that enables self-discipline to develop in a healthy way is the formation of good habits that become second nature.

When children are young it is possible to develop these habits by providing good examples and consistent routines. This enables children to learn by doing and is preferable to the reminders and lectures that are often given to older children when these habits were not established early on. When a young child becomes accustomed to hanging his/her coat on a hook whenever he/she comes to school, it becomes a natural part of what is done. The good habits that children establish at an early age pave the way for the development of maturity and self-discipline later.

When children bring heartfelt interest to their studies knowledge comes alive. This conjunction of feeling and thinking makes students more receptive and perceptive. Students begin their education with their feelings melded with what they do. During their time in school, their feelings must merge with what they think. When feelings connect strongly with ideas, idealism is born. Engendering thinking that is warm, vital and creative is an important goal of Waldorf education.

It is imperative that education directly touch the hearts of children, to help them care about their fellow human beings and reassure them that there is beauty and goodness in this world and that they play a role in preserving that beauty and goodness. As Vaclav Havel stated in his address to the United Nations, “The salvation of this human world lies nowhere else than in the human heart, in the human power to reflect, in human meekness and in human responsibility.”

To develop the capacity for emotional involvement, Waldorf schools enhance their educational program by integrating the arts throughout the curriculum. Artistic activities such as painting, drawing, drama and music infuse every child’s school experience.

Although capacities for thoughtfulness, emotional involvement, and intentional activity are connected, they do not develop uniformly. They develop during three distinct seven-year stages of childhood, and are therefore worked differently in preschool, grade school and high school.

In early childhood, from birth until around age seven, the child is primarily active. It is through activity that the young child is most easily engaged and most easily taught.

The urge to be active does not disappear when a child enters first grade. Neither is the young child unemotional before this time. Rather, activity recedes in importance and is gradually supplanted by a growing inwardness during the grade school years. During age six or seven until about age fourteen, feelings are paramount. This change occurs gradually, a growing emotional capacity begins to show itself.

The third seven-year phase is the one in which thinking prevails. Teenagers are certainly emotional and active, but their capacity for critical thinking shows itself with the onset of adolescence and particularly at the beginning of high school.

It is a Waldorf teacher’s responsibility to recognize each child’s strength, and together with the parents, bring this strength to fullness through a well-rounded education. Waldorf teachers will assess children in a variety of way to determine if they are developing a well-balanced array of abilities. They will look for signs of health: attentiveness, enthusiasm, involvement in class discussions and interest. These observations from a wide variety of subjects and situations are refined and distilled over the course of the school year. They provide a complete “portfolio” of a child’s performance and progression throughout the year. They become the ingredients in the annual written evaluation that is delivered each June.

Waldorf teachers first describe what the child does well and always mentions with appreciation the overcoming of difficulties and the development of any new capacity. Then teachers mention areas where children need to make more progress. This can be presented as a wish list, a hope for something to be accomplished in the future.

Waldorf Preschool Philosophy
In the Waldorf preschool the students enter a room that looks more like a home than a classroom. The lighting is subdued, the curtains and walls are pastel colors and the furniture is simple, natural wood. Most toys and play structures and wood, and carpeting encourages children to find a place on the floor to play. In the Waldorf approach early academic instruction is absent. Waldorf preschool provides an education that is rich in language experiences, sequential routines, and learning opportunities. The children are placed in a learning environment that provides many natural opportunities for learning. Young children will learn by doing and what they love to do is play.

Play is a key component of the Waldorf early childhood program because it promotes well-rounded, three dimensional development by engaging them emotionally, mentally and actively. Play develops emotional maturity through social interactions. It’s through play that children move beyond their own egocentricity and expand their knowledge of the social world. By learning to share, to agree and to cooperate, children learn to be part of a social group. This understanding is essential for the formation of positive human relationships and is one of the important life lessons children begin to learn in a Waldorf school.

Play helps the child develop discipline and concentration. Not only does play develop a child’s attention span, it also gives rise to imaginative and divergent thinking. This enables children to consider situations and to solve problems in a variety of different ways. Waldorf teachers purposely choose play objects that are not designed for a single purpose, but to serve the children in multiple ways.

The third beneficial aspect of play is activity. A principle of early childhood education is that young children learn about the world by interacting with their environment.

Work is also an important part of Waldorf preschool. Teachers intentionally work in the presence of children, with their help if possible. There is usually a day for baking, a day for making soup or butter, a day to wash the placemats, and time everyday to prepare the snack. Participating in work enables children to learn important lessons that are necessary for life. They learn to do their fare share and to help others.

Meaningful and purposeful activity done in the presence of children also provides them with actions to imitate. Impressions that young children take in and mimic become behaviors that are learned for life. The role of imitation is essential when it comes to learning language. Young children are able to learn so readily through imitation because they are so impressionable. Whatever is done in their presence becomes part of them. For this reason Waldorf teachers try to act in ways that are worthy of imitation. They speak softly and work carefully, modeling these behaviors continuously.

Preschool children come together each morning for circle time. The teachers stand with the children in the ring and lead them in song and movement games. Hand and foot coordination, eye and hand coordination, a sense of rhythm, tonal awareness, spatial awareness and a whole variety of intelligences are cultivated through enjoyable activity.

Besides the time for purposeful work and play, there is also time for quiet reflection. Story time is a large part of the program. Through told stories and puppet shows children learn folk and fairy tales from around the world, and develop literary skills. Stories are told from memory so that the magic of the spoken word can captivate the children. Great attention is paid to the quality of speech and the choice of words used, expanding the children’s vocabulary and their attention span. These tales provide children with models of good behavior without burdening them with admonishments or lectures.



 
Last edited:

lkwdblds

Crusader
Just a memo for Roger to know I am reading V.

Roger,
Just a quick line to let you know I received your post and have begun reading V's treatise. For such a thing as she has written, I need to give it some time, not be rushed and read it carefully. I plan on doing this within the next 24 to 48 hours and will get back to you and V with my thoughts on what I have learned.

Planet Earth is quite an interesting place. As long as I've been around in this body, it never ceases to amaze me how much more good stuff exists on this planet which I do not know about. This guy Rudolph Steiner, I never have heard of him before and the Waldorf system of education, never heard of that either. Of course, I see the Montessori schools around but had no idea of what their methods are or what they are based on. The video tape which Ted posted hear last week presented an incredible talk from Sir Ken (forgot his last name). Each time I run across great thinkers who exist here, or who have exited, about whom I know nothing, I am just amazed. There is no shortage of brilliance on this planet, it is here but one has to look for it. What is it the Bible says, "Seek and ye shall find!"

My only brush with something different in education is when someone turned me on to the book "Summerhill" about the school of the same name in England. This was back in the late 1960's. Erich Fromm was touting the Summerhill system and I believe he wrote an intro to the book. I got something out of reading it.

Well you did "get me going" as you predicted but my time is limited right at this moment so I will write more later, regarding V's treatise. I am looking up to you and V. as my mentors in education. My goal when reading things in a field where someone is more knowledgeable than I am is to duplicate what they are saying, try and make it my own, and come up with some fresh and intelligent insights which usually amount to examples I've encountered in life, or different ways of looking at data which may shed some additional insights into the area. I am really good at this role. In fact, according to this huge multi dial blowdown I had in 1992 with Denise Mulkey at AOLA auditing me, I cognited that my purpose in life was to be the back up guy for the really important leaders, i.e., I would not be cut out to be Simon Bolivar but I would function brialliantly as one of his inside top aides and advisors.
You'll hear from me soon.
Lakey
 

lkwdblds

Crusader
ROGER B'S NEW BOOK AND WEBSITE !!!!

MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENT- THE VERY WISE AND PROLIFIC ROGER B. HAS MADE IT KNOWN THAT HIS NEW WEBSITE ON STUDY AND EDUCATION IS NOW OPEN AND READY FOR VIEWING!! ALSO HIS NEW BOOK ON STUDY AND EDUCATION HAS BEEN RELEASED.

I have have decided to reopen this thread in order to help Roger promote his new book and website. The last posting here was on November 5th, 2009, not that long ago, less than 3 months. I was just amazed at the quality of the articles and replies which we posted here back in October and November of last year. With a nice group of people interested in study and education already posting on this thread, it seemed only natural to link this thread to Roger's new website.

Also, I think it would also be worthwhile for readers, especially new readers, to review the replies on this thread which have already been written. It is truly incredible the quality of these posts, and so many facets of education are discussed in depth and with clarity. Many of these posts are also by Roger.

Roger's new website address is http://www.howtolearn-howtoteach.com/
Good reading and may your studies never be the same!.........Lakey
 
Last edited:

lkwdblds

Crusader
L.A. City Schools - 1940's and 1950"s

I was in L.A. City Schools from Sept. 1944 (start of Kindergarten) to June 1951, end of 6th grade in elementary school, Junior high until June 1954 and Alexander Hamilton High School until June 1957. I do not know what study tech they were using in those days but all three of those institutions, were absolutely outstanding places to learn at. I learned just a ton of knowledge at each place and just loved going to school, especially the elementary school, Marvin Avenue School. With my Lakey memory, I remember the whole thing starting 66 years ago at the age of 4 as if it were just a few weeks ago. The kindergarten memories are vivid. My Mom dropped me off in our one car, a green 1941 Chevrolet and then took the car home so my Dad could drive to work. My Dad was not home yet when school let out so my Mom walked the 3/4 miles to school with my younger twin Brothers Bobby and Bruce and would wait outside the gate for me to walk me home. In the meantime, the first graders would stand at the kindergarten gate just before we were let out, taunting us with the phrase, "Kindergarten baby, born in the Navy" On November 9, 1944, one of my brothers, Brucey, died unexpectedly over night, he was fine the previous day but somehow had pneumonia and could not breathe durning the night. It kept getting worse and my parents frantically called the Doctor's hot line but the best they could do was send our doctor to us by 7:15 the next morning. I saw Brucey in his high chair, gasping for air in the morning and was quickly whisked off to school by my Grandma. The Doctor arrived at 7:15 in the morning and Bruce was still alive but just barely, there was nothing she could do, she tried to get him to drink some water and he died right in her arms at around 7:30.

Anyway, getting back to school, in 1944 it was mostly playing outside and making things with paper and scissors and crayons inside, we had no academic learning that I can remember, just playing and making arts and crafts. They used to have us take naps daily at our desk. We were told to not look up and keep our eyes closed. I was a "goody two shoes" and always did what I was told. If you napped without cheating, you would get a gold star put by your name (Every one's name was on the top of the blackboard, followed by their gold stars).

I know we did not yet differentiate between a boy and a girl. We knew there was a difference but it meant nothing when chosing who to play with. The most popular game was playing horsey. One student would be the hourse and the other would put a jump rope around his waist and give him commands and steer him around the playground. Often the horse would stop at the drinking fountain and quench its thirst. At Christmas, we made cut out dolls of santa and his elves. They were two dimensional, the feet just turned outwards, but by first grade the Santa's were made more 3 dimensional. One teacher, Mrs. Higgins was really old school and used physical force to discipline kids who were not obeying. She did such things as pinch the kids or swat their hands or wrists with a swatter and very rarely, she would pull a kid's hair to break up a fight. That woman was pushing 60 years of age, meaning she was born in the 1880's. It all happened sooo long ago. Roosevelt was President and the Battle of the Bulge in WWII was taking place during our Christmas vacation.
Lakey
 
Last edited:

EP - Ethics Particle

Gold Meritorious Patron
Rog and V's contribution!

This e-book on education, study and life SCREAMS for a Spanish (and other) translation, IMO. :yes::thumbsup::clap::clap:

(Miami NEEDS it...also California!) :omg::yes:

EP
 

lkwdblds

Crusader
Reply to EP

EP - Funny that you should mention the Spanish Language edition of the book. Roger asked me for a critique of the outline of the book and one of the first things I did was recommend a Spanish language edition. I posted that this morning on the Aboard the Apollo - 1973 thread. Well, as they say, we are on the same page.
Lakey
 

RogerB

Crusader
Quick Reply . . . I'm in the Middle of Twenty Things

This e-book on education, study and life SCREAMS for a Spanish (and other) translation, IMO. :yes::thumbsup::clap::clap:

(Miami NEEDS it...also California!) :omg::yes:

EP

It's not on "study" . . . it's on how to learn:yes:

BIG difference . . . I get into that on page one, chapter one. Go to a dictionary look up the difference between the two.

Hubbard screwed up on that point. I correct that point . . . his "study barriers" are not barriers to "study or studying" . . . . . but then they are/were not his anyway! We know for a fact he plagiarized the info from another and then screwed it up!

The title of the book says it all . . . . . and it has nothing to do with or any similarity to Scn stuff or Hubbard's stuff . . . . the only similarity is that he, along with every other person who addressed the issue of education and learning, and in particular the Berners whose stuff Hubbard pinched, addressed the basic action and phenomena of addressing and studying subjects that are attempted to be learned! Hubbard was inexact . . . he was actually trying to accomplish learning ...NOT "studying"!! . . . he was just dull enough to be that inexact!)

The only similarity is that we are addressing a subject students engage in . . . like we also breath.

So dump the ex-Scn think.

This book unravels the mystery of why it is that folks fail to benefit from their basic ability to learn when they are trying to learn something!

Now, that is a big, important and precise subject! No?

Part two of the book deals with a heretofore totally omitted subject . . . and that is the subject of why it is a person is unable to even engage in the basic actions of being present and studying (paying attention to and addressing the thing to be learned!). This material, of course, is also a key to why it is folks have difficulty being effective in life . . . but that is another application of the phenomena.

Read this material in a new unit of time based on your life experience . . . Relate it to that experience, don't relate it to some other subject you think is "the same" or "similar."

And yes . . . it needs to be translated :yes: And yes, it could even be broken into two books (we have used part one without chapter one in corporate America by itself).

It blows their socks off.

Rog
 

lkwdblds

Crusader
A little more on my Grammar SchoolI

The education was so good in the elelmentary school I attended in the late 1940's that I wanted to comment a little more.
First Grade: I remember learning to read with those Dick and Jane type of books, i.e. "Spot is my dog. See spot run." That type of thing. Status entered in for the first time, they had 3 reading groups, group red, group green and group yellow. The fastest learners were in red and the slowest were in yeloow. We were not told that but all the kids soon figured it out. There was definitely some status involved in being in group red and a bit of embarassment for being in group yellow. I believe we took up addition and perhaps learned to do write the alphabet in block letters. During recess, the boys and girls formed there separate teams and we played sock ball, kick ball, dodge ball and tether ball. Also there was 4 square and jump rope.
Second Grade: The big new thing was learning to write in long hand and in ink. Yes, we sat at desks with ink holes and used quill type pens with a metal nub and dipped the nubs into the ink well. Ball point pens did not arrive until 1949 and this was only 1946. In math we were introduced to subtraction. We also began to learn the state capitols and the capitols of all the countries and I believe we started to learn American History.
Third Grade We had penmanship drills, making ovals and zig zag lines to improve our handwriting. We learned multiplication tables. That was the year we studied California Missions and made maps of the state using some plaster of Paris type mixture. We went on our first bus trip down to San Pedro harbor about 30 miles away. I remember I heard the word smog for the first time. Some kids in the bus were very bothered by their eyes stinging. The teacher told us smog was a combination of smoke and fog and was made by motors and was not healthy to breathe. We began spelling bees and doing book reports. We started having a music period where we sang patriotic songs and learned all of the Steven Foster songs of the early South.
Fourth Grade: I think everyone had to read Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. We all enjoyed those wonderful books, real classics. We did not learn long division until 5th grade but in the fourth grade we studied South America. Whatever I know of that continent was all learned in grammar school. The music period continued and now each student was encouraged to stand up and give a report on some news item of the day which they heard on the radio (no TV until 5th grade because they were not sold yet.) Instead of news, we could give a Science report, any thing about life science or physical science or medical science. The recess games started getting tougher and there was more rough housing.
I'm going to knock it off right here.
Lakey
 
Top