Jeannette McHenry sues Narconon Louisiana New Life Retreat (re Scientology rehab)

CommunicatorIC

@IndieScieNews on Twitter
Jeannette McHenry sues Narconon Louisiana New Life Retreat (re Scientology rehab).

The Advocate: Lawsuit: Denham Springs drug rehab clinic a recruiting tool for Scientology
http://theadvocate.com/news/11393810-123/lawsuit-denham-springs-drug-rehab

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By Joe Gyan Jr., The Advocate, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, January 24, 2015

Jeannette McHenry took out a bank loan and borrowed money from family to help come up with the $27,000 to send her son to Narconon Louisiana New Life Retreat, a residential drug rehabilitation program in Denham Springs.

What her son got instead of substance abuse counseling, McHenry claims in a lawsuit filed in Baton Rouge federal court, is heavy indoctrination into the Church of Scientology.

McHenry, of Washington state, alleges in the suit that the Narconon program is merely a Scientology recruiting tool.

Narconon “used a ‘bait and switch’ scheme whereby (it) promised (McHenry) extensive substance abuse counseling for her son and then delivered only Scientology teaching and dangerous Scientology rituals,” McHenry alleges in the suit.

One of the allegedly dangerous rituals, McHenry contends, is a sauna program that a New Life Retreat official told her had been scientifically shown to reduce or eliminate an addict’s drug cravings by flushing out residual drug toxins stored in the addict’s fatty tissues.

“No such scientific evidence exists,” the suit maintains. “NLR’s claims about the benefits of its sauna program ... are false and do not withstand scientific scrutiny.”

McHenry’s son spent up to five hours a day in the sauna at temperatures between 160 degrees and 180 degrees, the suit states, and no medical personnel oversaw him while he was undergoing the sauna program last year.

Material on Narconon International’s website states that the detoxification program, which includes the sauna program, is carefully supervised. The online material says tens of thousands of people have successfully completed the full drug rehabilitation program.

The McHenry suit’s defendants include Narconon Louisiana New Life Retreat and the nonprofit Narconon International.

Narconon International, which is based in Los Angeles, and Narconon Louisiana New Life Retreat did not return messages seeking comment on McHenry’s allegations.

Plaquemine lawyer Patrick Pendley, one of McHenry’s attorneys, said her suit is one of many that have been filed around the country against Narconon entities.

“Narconon preys upon people experiencing Ms. McHenry’s desperation to do something, anything to pull a loved one out of destructive addictive behavior,” Pendley said Friday. “We are trying to shine the public spotlight on these fraudulent programs that do more harm than good to the patient.”

The suit, filed Monday, seeks damages and a court order prohibiting the defendants “from further engaging in deceptive trade practices.” Those practices, McHenry alleges, are “immoral, unethical, oppressive, unscrupulous, and substantially injurious to consumers.”

Narconon is not part of the Church of Scientology, but the research of the late Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard does form the basis of the Narconon program, according to Narconon International’s website. In 1976, Hubbard gave Narconon the right to use his copyrighted works for drug rehabilitation purposes.

Messages left at the Church of Scientology International in Los Angeles also were not returned.

The Narconon program is secular, teaches no dogma and does not require a person to convert to a faith, the online material states.

The drug rehabilitation program consists of a drug-free withdrawal, detoxification and a series of life-skills courses to help recovering addicts overcome their addiction and learn how to solve their problems without drugs. It generally takes three to five months to complete the program.

The Narconon network consists of more than 120 rehabilitation and drug prevention centers around the world, including the Denham Springs facility.

McHenry, who claims no one at NLR ever spoke to her son about the specifics of his life or substance abuse issues, says each patient undergoing the Narconon program receives the same eight course books based on Hubbard’s work.

In place of “actual addiction treatment,” her suit alleges, NLR had her son study and practice Scientology.

“NLR is using the Narconon program to introduce Scientology and L. Ron Hubbard’s ‘technology’ to unwitting patients seeking drug rehabilitation,” the suit charges.

NLR had her son perform drills, known as “training routines,” which come straight from Scientology scripture and have no apparent connection to substance abuse treatment, McHenry contends.

In one of those drills, she alleges, NLR had her son sit with another patient and repeatedly ask the other patient, “Do fish swim?” for hours on end.

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HT - WWP: https://whyweprotest.net/threads/jeannette-mchenry-sues-narconon-louisiana-new-life-retreat.122873/
 

Freeminds

Bitter defrocked apostate
At last the secret's out and Narconon's name is mud. 2015 ought to be the year when this facet of the Hubbard scam becomes a liability rather than an asset. A few lawsuits will soon bankrupt any Narconon scam branch, because money in Scientology only ever flows upwards.

Goodbye Narconon scam. After that... what's left? Just the whales, as far as I can see.
 

Elronius of Marcabia

Silver Meritorious Patron
From Dianetics to the Purif these people just can't get away from false medical
claims can they ? goodnight Narcanon :clap: and the "Science" that never was :thumbsup:
 

oneonewasaracecar

Gold Meritorious Patron
At last the secret's out and Narconon's name is mud. 2015 ought to be the year when this facet of the Hubbard scam becomes a liability rather than an asset. A few lawsuits will soon bankrupt any Narconon scam branch, because money in Scientology only ever flows upwards.

Goodbye Narconon scam. After that... what's left? Just the whales, as far as I can see.

...and any blackmail they have. The two are not mutually exclusive.
 

AnonyMary

Formerly Fooled - Finally Free
The comment I tried unsuccessfully to post there at the article

This article starts out talking about the latest lawsuit by Hamilton, files in Lousianna but then goes all copy/paste from Narconon about the program.

Narconon is more than just things written by Hubbard. It is a program of religious practices re-labeled, packaged and simplified using illustrations of the very same Scientology procedures which are part of the mainstay of the Scientology course and steps on their 'road to total freedom"

Please visit Narconon Reviews http://narcononreviews.net for accurate and independent information about Narconon, a dangerous Scientology based practice and program. This is a must-see for people seeking help for their loved one, and for journalists to get the facts before they copy paste Scientology/Narconon propaganda descriptions about it's program to explain what the program is about while hiding the real facts. A google search of the internet of these key words: Narconon + bridge+ t+ the Scientology+ Bridge will show you how Narconon is designed to be the bridge to bring patients to Scientology's crazy 'bridge to total freedom'.
 

Leland

Crusader
The comment I tried unsuccessfully to post there at the article

I agree 100%

Narconon = Scientology

IF, the Cult charges $$ and bills Insurance Companies...for the Narconon stuff....which is just relabeled Scientology.... Then they are a BUSINESS. They sell goods and services.

Then how can Cult then turn around and claim they are a religion...and not a business......and have Tax Exemption?

Just doesn't make any sense.

Edited: How can the Cult claim that LRH's writing are now "scripture" and non secular.......and then claim that Narconon, with the same written materials....is secular. Just doesn't add up.
 
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