Jimmy Stewart and L. Ron Hubbard

guanoloco

As-Wased
OK, let's start with Jimmy Stewart from this: http://msnbc.msn.com/id/40442988/?Gt1=43001

The five-time best actor nominee was born in Indiana, Pa., on May 20, 1908. His father owned the local hardware store in a building that today is across the street from the museum honoring his son. The hardware store was a local curiosity because it was where Stewart displayed the 1940 best actor Oscar he won for “The Philadelphia Story.” Customers admired it there next to the cash register when they paid for things like hammers and plumbing supplies.

A Boy Scout whose memory is still honored by The Boy Scout Jimmy Stewart Good Citizen Award, he graduated from Princeton University in 1932 and was soon commiserating about the difficulties of Broadway auditions with his tenement roommate, another eventual icon, Henry Fonda.

Serving his country
The success of “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” (1939) and “The Philadelphia Story” (1940) made him a star and brought with it all the perks of fame — including an opportunity to duck duty in World War II.

Not Stewart, an avid aviator who’d earned his pilot’s license in 1935.

“The studio told him he didn’t have to go to war and they were against him going,” Harley says. “Like a lot of stars, they wanted him to stay home safe and sell war bonds. But that wasn’t his way. It made front-page news all over the country when he traded his $200,000 a year life in Beverly Hills for $21 a month to serve overseas as a private in the Army Air Corps.”

True to his word and displaying a puckish sense of humor, he still dutifully forked over a percentage of the monthly stipend to his agent back in Hollywood.

George Bailey was a chagrined 4-F, ineligible for service, but Jimmy Stewart the bomber pilot was more like four stars. He flew 20 combat missions, was awarded six battle stars and in 1945 returned home a full colonel.

He refused his military pension and donated it all back to the government. He remained active in the Air Force Reserve and retired in 1968 as a Brigadier General and earning the Distinguished Service Medal.

At age 41 he married Gloria Hatrick McLean, already a mother to sons, Ronald, 5, and Michael, 3. Fraternal twin sisters, Judy and Kelly, were celebrated in 1951.

The family enjoyed a comfortable life at 918 North Roxbury in Beverly Hills. They tended an ample vegetable garden and shared the fresh bounty with neighbors Lucille Ball, Jack Benny and Rosemary Clooney.

They don't make 'em like they used to
One of the museum’s most cherished exhibits is the actual front door from the home, sold and demolished after Stewart’s death in 1997 at age 89. Visitors peek through the door’s peephole and imagine what it was like to see frequent guests such as Stewart friends Ronald Reagan, Bob Hope, Johnny Carson and Gregory Peck standing outside.

“Growing up there made you not want to grow up,” daughter Kelly Stewart Harcourt is quoted as saying.

The museum shows a life imbued with joy on- and offscreen. Museum board member Pauline Simms says the people today look at the exhibits, recall the movies and marvel at a man so talented and, gosh, just so darn normal.

“The one comment we hear most of all is, ‘They just don’t make ‘em like him any more,” she says.

It’s true. It’s impossible to imagine Stewart bouncing up and down on Oprah’s couch.

He eventually expressed his life’s love in a much more poignant and profound way.

“He was devastated by the death of his wife in 1994,” Ward says, “and he lived out his final three years as a recluse. He loved her very much.”


To my knowledge Jimmy Stewart didn't have one person, let alone departments and orgs, devoted to PR for his persona. I have never heard or read Jimmy Stewart lecturing, writing or designing courses on ethics, morals, justice or virtues of humanity.

Now let's look at L. Ron Hubbard from this: http://www.watchman.org/sci/lrhmyth2.htm

Scientology: World War II broke out and Hubbard was commissioned as a junior grade lieutenant in the U.S. Navy and served as a corvette commander (What is Scientology?, p. 119). He had seen combat in the South Pacific and Atlantic (The Church of Scientology - 40th Anniversary, p. 50). Hubbard claimed, in a tape-recorded lecture, that his eyes were injured due to a bomb exploding in his face. He was "flown home in the late spring of 1942 in the secretary of the Navy's private plane as the first U.S.-returned casualty from the Far East" (The Los Angeles Times, June 24, 1990, p. A38). By 1945, he had received 29 medals and palms, including a Purple Heart, and suffered injuries to his optic nerves, hip, and back. Hubbard was admitted to Oak Knoll Naval Hospital in Oakland, California for treatment. It was there that he was pronounced partially blind and lame (The Church of Scientology - 40th Anniversary, p. 50; The Los Angeles Times, June 24, 1990, p. A38).

Fact: Through the Freedom of Information Act, The Los Angeles Times received Hubbard's actual military, V.A., and medical records. The highest rank Hubbard ever received was Lieutenant senior grade, not Commander, which is the rank between Captain and Rear Admiral. Hubbard's service record shows that he never saw action against the enemy, and received only four awards, none for combat or wounds. He was never awarded the Purple Heart (Ibid.; also, military service records on file).

Naval records described Hubbard: "By assuming unauthorized authority and attempting to perform duties for which he has no qualification he became the source of much trouble. This officer is not satisfactory for independent duty assignment. He is garrulous and tries to give impressions of his importance. He also seems to think that he has unusual ability in most lines. These characteristics indicate that he will require close supervision for satisfactory performance of any intelligence duty" (Memo from U.S. Naval Attache L.D. Causey to the Commandant, Twelfth Naval District, February 14, 1942). And more than a year later, "Consider this officer lacking in the essential qualities of judgment, leadership and cooperation. He acts without forethought as to probable results. Not considered qualified for command or promotion at this time. Recommend duty on a large vessel where he can be properly supervised" (File # 113392, "Report on the Fitness of Officers," Period from May 29, 1943 to July 7, 1943).

After claiming to have destroyed two enemy submarines, an investigation concluded it didn't happen. Later, L. Ron Hubbard, according to an investigation, disregarded orders and conducted gunnery practice in Mexican territorial waters. He was relieved of command and a letter of admonition was placed in his files. "In Hubbard's defense, Scientology officials accused others of distorting and misrepresenting his military glories. They say the Navy 'covered up' Hubbard's sinking of the submarines" (Los Angeles Times, June 24, 1990; also, military service records on file).

Furthermore, the medical files show that when he was admitted to Oak Knoll he had 20/20 vision, with glasses, and there is no mention of "injured optic nerves." At the time he left the hospital his eyesight was 12/20 in the right eye and 14/20 in the left, with glasses. This coincided with Hubbard's application for a disability pension. Interestingly, his military records show Hubbard stating he "contracted conjunctivitis from exposure to excessive tropical sunlight" (Ibid.).

Scientology: It was at Oak Knoll where Ron began to theorize that the mind could effect the body's functions. He decided to test the therapeutic techniques he had developed along this vein. He tested his techniques of removing "mental blocks" in patients who were previously unresponsive to medical treatment, with great success (What is Scientology?, p. 121). He helped over 400 individuals by 1950. He fully recovered his own health by 1949, and the Naval Retiring Board that reviewed his case was in shock to find that the very same man who had suffered so many battle injuries passed his full physical examination. They were forced to designate him fit for active duty (What is Scientology?, p. 123).

Fact: In October 1947 Hubbard wrote to the Veteran's Administration asking for psychiatric treatment due to suffering from wartime service. By 1948, Hubbard was able to get a disability award of 40% for his "duodenal ulcer, infection of the eyes, bursitis of the right shoulder and arthritis of multiple joints." In an August 1951 medical examination, Hubbard complained of the same conditions listed in his disability award, and according to a letter from the Veteran's Administration, he was still receiving the 40% disability compensation in 1973. In fact, he continued to receive his 40% disability check through at least 1980 (The Los Angeles Times, June 24, 1990, p. A38, and records on file).

"Hubbard's Sea Org 'Medical Officer,' Kim Douglas, testified in court that while she attended him from 1975 to 1980, he suffered from arthritis, bursitis and coronary trouble, which Dianetics was supposed to alleviate." He wore glasses, in private, the rest of his life (A Piece of Blue Sky, p. 87).


We all know Ron's marriage record and here's an individual that wrote reams of information and lectured for hours on ethics, morals, justice and the virtues of humanity. Ron solved all of man's toubles. :thumbsup:
 

LongTimeGone

Silver Meritorious Patron
The only point I can find in this that is not entirely accurate is the ranks.
Commander is not between Captain and Rear Admiral.
The ranks in the US Navy are:
Ensign
Lieutenant Junior Grade
Lieutenant
Lieutenant Commander
Commander
Captain
Rear Admiral
Vice Admiral
Admiral

A Lieutenant can "command" a vessel and could be addressed as "Captain".

In all other respects my vote goes to Mr Stewart.

D.
 

Zinjifar

Silver Meritorious Sponsor
Bear in mind that Ron was with Naval Intelligence during the war (and afterwards, when he assisted in investigating a satanist cult in Pasadena) and His *true* record is hidden to mere mortals.

Some of these mere mortals have gone so far as to suggest that Ron wasn't in Naval Intelligence at all, but, confabulated His service from his 'hat' as 'Intelligence Officer' as a junior officer; censoring letters home and receiving encrypted radio communications...

Zinj
 

SirRalliart

Patron with Honors
Bear in mind that Ron was with Naval Intelligence during the war (and afterwards, when he assisted in investigating a satanist cult in Pasadena) and His *true* record is hidden to mere mortals.

Some of these mere mortals have gone so far as to suggest that Ron wasn't in Naval Intelligence at all, but, confabulated His service from his 'hat' as 'Intelligence Officer' as a junior officer; censoring letters home and receiving encrypted radio communications...

Zinj

If he was actually in the Naval Intelligence service, wouldn't that make him an illegal pc as per point 3 in the HCOB/PL on illegal pcs????

I've had to make that adjudication before, well, until OSA said that's their job. As SNR C/S, I could only handle points 1 and 2 in the latter years.

The pot calling the kettle black?
 

JackStraw

Silver Meritorious Patron
If he was actually in the Naval Intelligence service, wouldn't that make him an illegal pc as per point 3 in the HCOB/PL on illegal pcs????

I've had to make that adjudication before, well, until OSA said that's their job. As SNR C/S, I could only handle points 1 and 2 in the latter years.

The pot calling the kettle black?

That, and, he was a career criminal, on the run from the authorities for decades, a drug revert, engaging in "other practices"...the list goes on.

Jack
 

Ogsonofgroo

Crusader
Every time I've read the spew about Hubbard and Naval Intelligence I get this haunting vision of a drunken, drugged-out, paranoid, psychotic, splayed out on a couch, trying to communicate with the lint-ball he dug out of his belly-button with a mirror and toothpick...
I are need brain bleach+

:p
 
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