Jon Atack + 'Intervention' Leaflet

i-Betty

Patron
Hi :)

Message from JA.


This is a version of the leaflet that was handed out to 'body-routers' and whomsoever they approached at the EG Bookstore and the Chichester Mission, back in the mid-90s. Both closed within a few months. A couple of polite Christians would approach the body router and explain that they would be handing out the leaflet. The body router would scurry back into the shop, and be told that the Xenu story is utterly false and they would henceforth have to pay double to have a Class VIII auditor (really). The kindly Christians would hand the leaflet to anyone offered a free personality test. Bonnie and Richard Woods were sued for the leaflet and the clut had to pay 55,000 in damages and give an apology in open court. It also agreed never to sue the Woods for anything they said in future about the clut.

Betsy [at the Bunker] has recently said that she's leaving copies of Scientology: the Cult of Greed lying around. This leaflet is also good for this. Please copy it and spread it far and wide. Also good for politicians, and short enough for their attention span. It can be added to press releases, too.


A printable version of Jon's leaflet can be found here: http://1drv.ms/1E31RbW


The Truth about Scientology


Seventy-five million years ago, galactic Prince Xenu brought the populations of 76 planets to Earth and ‘clustered’ their souls together by exploding them in volcanoes with hydrogen bombs. If this sounds like the work of a science-fiction writer, it is, but it is sold as cold, hard fact, in sworn secrecy, and for tens of thousands of dollars by the self-styled ‘Church’ of Scientology.


Traditionally, the term ‘Church’ meant a Christian group, but senior Scientologists have long been taught that Christ was a ‘hypnotic implant’ – a hallucination – from the time of Prince Xenu. According to the secret doctrine of ‘Operating Thetan Section Three,’ we are all superclusters of these souls or ‘body thetans’.


Dianetics and Scientology were created by pulp-fiction writer Lafayette Ronald Hubbard. Before publishing his first textbook, in 1950, Hubbard boasted that the easiest way to make a fortune was to start a religion. At his death, in 1986, Hubbard left almost $650 million, all of it derived from Scientology, which openly uses ‘hard sell’ techniques to extract cash from followers.


Hubbard was deeply involved with the practice of Aleister Crowley's ‘Sex Magick.’ In 1946, he participated in homosexual rituals aimed at incarnating the goddess Babalon, the anti-Christian force of the biblical Book of Revelation. Soon after, he wrote in one of his journals ‘men are your slaves.’

The ‘Church’ of Scientology was incorporated secretly by Hubbard, in 1953, following a letter, where he talked about the ‘religion angle.’ Scientology became a ‘religion’ in the USA to avoid further investigation by the American Medical Association into Hubbard's many far-fetched claims. These include the preposterous claims that Scientology will cure cancer, leukemia and blindness. Hubbard even claimed that he could raise the dead.


Ron Hubbard dismissed all other therapies and religious systems, saying that only he had made any significant discovery in the field of the mind and spirit, in ‘50,000 years.’ Scientologists are forbidden to use any other therapy system, most especially psychiatry, which Hubbard claimed was a conspiracy to enslave and destroy the human race.

Hubbard made numerous false claims about his life. He was not, in fact, a nuclear physicist, an explorer, nor a war hero. His claims to have studied with mystics in China, Tibet and India are entirely false. He was asked to leave a civil engineering degree course for poor scholarship, failed his atomic physics course, and his only visits to the mystic East were on two brief teenage holidays to China.


Hubbard told many contradictory stories about his life, his exploits growing larger with each passing year. In an autobiography published shortly after World War Two, Hubbard admitted that his ‘war wound’ was a fall down a ship's ladder, rather than the machine-gun bullet wounds he would later claim.


Hubbard claimed to have ‘broken broncos’ as a child, and been a ‘blood brother’ of the Blackfeet People at the age of four (a claim made retroactively ‘true’ by a Scientologist Blackfoot, after Hubbard's death).


Although Scientologists campaign against drug abuse, through a group called Narconon, Hubbard was a self-confessed barbiturate addict, who experimented freely with drugs, even publicly recommending the use of amphetamines or ‘speed’. Hubbard chain-smoked over a hundred cigarettes a day, unable to break the habit, despite the claims made for his drug rehab group.


Hubbard called his cure for psychosis an ‘isolation watch.’ Scientologists call it ‘baby-watching.’ The person is kept isolated and must not be communicated to in any way. A scandal erupted at Scientology's Florida headquarters, when Scientologist Lisa McPherson died during an isolation watch, allegedly headed by current cult leader, David Miscavige.


Scientologists undertake hundreds of hours of ‘counselling,’ at times paying $1000 an hour. The ‘counselling’ consists of different forms of hypnosis – techniques of repetition, fixation and mimicry – which all heighten suggestibility, and undermine the critical faculties. Indeed, in a 1955 letter, Hubbard offered his ‘brainwashing’ techniques to the FBI.

While being promised that through Scientology individuals will regain their ‘self-determinism,’ Scientology actually leads to unquestioning acceptance of Hubbard's belief system and the erosion of independent thought and compassion. To complete the elaborate and lengthy steps of Hubbard's ‘Bridge to Total Freedom’ takes years and costs in the region of $500,000. Some Scientologists have lost their homes and businesses, to pay for increasingly expensive courses.


With the secret ‘Upper Levels,’ Scientologists seek to achieve supernatural powers. Several thousand former Scientologists who have taken these courses since the 1960s can attest that the techniques are completely ineffective, leading only to a progressive dissociation from reality and sometimes delusions of psychic abilities. It is many years since James Randi offered a million dollars to anyone who could reliably demonstrate a supernatural ability. Despite much boasting, no Scientologist has succeeded in this challenge.

With the secret ‘OT 3’ material, Hubbard exploited the traditional belief in demon possession, and induced multiple personality disorder in his followers. It is not surprising that many Scientologists have either committed suicide or ended up in psychiatric hospitals.


Often, recruitment into Scientology begins with a personality test. The ‘Oxford Capacity Analysis’ was written by a former merchant seamen, unschooled in psychology. The 200 question test has no connection with Oxford University, and demands extensive personal information. The Scientologists have a long history of using material supposedly received in confidence to harass former members.


Scientology staff members work very long hours for very little pay (often 90 hours per week for less than $30). Scientology is governed by the Sea Organization, members of which wear pseudo-naval uniforms, including campaign ribbons. Often, they are allowed to see their children for only an hour, once every two weeks. The children are brought up in the ‘Cadet Organisation,’ where they are taught absolute obedience to Scientology. Many women have been subjected to harsh and relentless persuasion by cult officials, until they terminated their pregnancies.


When their production statistics sag, Sea Organization members are put onto a diet of rice and beans, sometimes for months on end. Miscreants are moved to ‘pigs berthing.’ If this punishment fails, the offender is put into the ‘Rehabilitation Project Force’ or RPF. Membership of the RPF labour camp often lasts for years. ‘RPFers’ eat table scraps, sleep even shorter hours than the rest of the staff, may not speak unless spoken to, work long hours at menial tasks, such as toilet cleaning, must obey all orders without question or hesitation, and spend five hours a day confessing the ‘evil purposes’ of their supposed previous incarnations and their ‘crimes’ against Hubbard or Scientology. The RPF is a testimony to the exploitative persuasion techniques of Scientology. It is based upon the thought-reform camps of Mao's China.


Scientologists have been involved in many criminal activities. Eleven, including Hubbard's wife Mary Sue, were imprisoned in the US for infiltrating government agencies and stealing files, including Interpol files on terrorism. During the course of these activities Scientologists bugged and burgled government offices, around the world. Mary Sue Hubbard signed a full confession of more than 200 pages.

Scientology is well known for its tireless ‘fair game’ campaigns against critics. For instance, Hubbard ordered that cartoonist Berry be ruined for simply mentioning Scientology in a single cartoon. According to the private investigator who ran the campaign for Scientology, $150,000 was spent on following Sunday Times journalist Russell Miller. Author Paulette Cooper was framed for a bomb threat by Scientology. Defector Pat Broeker was tailed by PIs for 24 years, at a cost of over $10 million to Patrons of Scientology.

Anyone who speaks out against the cult is labelled a ‘suppressive person’ and may be subjected to ‘fair game’ harassment. Critic Paulette Cooper was framed for a bomb threat, and Scientologists have also been found guilty of kidnapping and false imprisonment. A French court has judged Scientology fraudulent. Scientology has been found guilty of libel against Canadian judge, Casey Hill.

Scientology frequently splits up families. This stems from ‘disconnection,’ where Scientologists are forbidden to speak to anyone critical of Scientology. Scientology also forbids membership to active homosexuals and discourages disabled people. Former members often take years, and even decades, to recover from the highly invasive techniques of Scientology. Most are unaware that their critical and emotional faculties have been interfered with, with powerful hypnotic techniques, so fail to seek help.

Please copy this leaflet and distribute it as widely as possible.



For more information see: Jon Atack, Let's sell these people A Piece of Blue Sky; Scientology: the Church of Hate; Scientology: the Cult of Greed; Russell Miller, Bare-Faced Messiah; Jenna Miscavige-Hill, Beyond Belief; Marc Headley, Blown for Good; Margery Wakefield, The Road to Xenu; John Duignan, The Complex; Lawrence Wright, Going Clear; Bent Corydon with Brian Ambry, L. Ron Hubbard: Messiah or Madman.
Websites: http://bluesky.exscientologistsireland.org/ ; http://tonyortega.org ; http://infinitecomplacency.blogspot.com/ ; http://www.xenu.net/
On Hubbard and hypnosis, see Jon Atack, Never Believe a Hypnotist:
http://home.snafu.de/tilman/j/hypnosis.html
 
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Type4_PTS

Diamond Invictus SP
Nice!


:clapping:




I'm wondering though about this section:
Hubbard made numerous false claims about his life. He was not, in fact, a nuclear physicist, an explorer, nor a war hero. His claims to have studied with mystics in China, Tibet and India are entirely false. He was asked to leave a civil engineering degree course for poor scholarship, failed his atomic physics course, and his only visits to the mystic East were on two brief teenage holidays to China.

I thought that Hubbard was confirmed as a member of the Explorer's Club, was he not?

If yes, perhaps that doc can be edited. :unsure:
 

strativarius

Inveterate gnashnab & snoutband
An excellent leaflet, however the links at the bottom do not seem to be working.
Click on the link and then remove the semi-colon at the end of the URL after the slash. That's why the links aren't working. (The last two links should work OK.)

HTH
 
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DeeAnna

Patron Meritorious
Here is a proposed "cleaned up and slightly expanded in places" version of the above. It is still fairly long and will likely generate a "too long, didn't read" reaction in some. I also corrected a few spelling, punctuation and formatting errors.




The Truthabout Scientology


Seventy-five million years ago, galactic Prince Xenu brought the populations of 76 planets to Earth and "clustered" their souls together by exploding them in volcanoes with hydrogen bombs. If this sounds like the work of a science-fiction writer, it is, but it is sold as cold, hard fact, in sworn secrecy, and for tens of thousands of dollars by the Church of Scientology.

Traditionally, the term "Church" meant a Christian group, but senior Scientologists have long been taught that Christ was a "hypnotic implant" – a hallucination – from the time of Prince Xenu. According to the secret doctrine of "Operating Thetan Section Three", we are all superclusters of these souls or "body thetans".

Dianetics and Scientology were created by pulp-fiction writer Lafayette Ronald Hubbard. Before publishing his first textbook, in 1950, Hubbard boasted that the easiest way to make a fortune was to start a religion. At his death, in 1986, Hubbard left almost $650 million, all of it derived from Scientology, which openly uses "hard sell" techniques to extract cash from followers.

Hubbard was deeply involved with the occult. In 1946, he joined a group founded by the infamous British occultist Aleister Crowley and participated in sexual rituals aimed at incarnating the goddess Babalon, the anti-Christian force of the biblical Book of Revelation. Soon after, he wrote in one of his journals “men are your slaves”. The idea of gaining power over his fellow humans beings became a consistent theme in his private writings from this period.

The Church of Scientology was incorporated by Hubbard in 1953, following a letter where he talked about the “religion angle”. Scientology became a "religion’" in the USA to avoid further investigation by the American Medical Association into Hubbard's many far-fetched claims. These include the preposterous claims that Scientology will cure cancer, leukemia and blindness. Hubbard even claimed that he could raise the dead. Such claims continue to be made by some scientologists even today, to the point that scientologists often may be dissuaded from seeking traditional medical care for serious illnesses.

Ron Hubbard dismissed all other therapies and religious systems, saying that only he had made any significant discovery in the field of the mind and spirit, in “50,000 years”. Scientologists are forbidden to use any other therapy system, most especially psychiatry, which Hubbard claimed was a conspiracy to enslave and destroy the human race. They are also dissuaded from taking necessary and effective medications such as anti-seizure and anti-hypertensive drugs.

Hubbard made numerous false claims about his life. He was not, in fact, a nuclear physicist, a doctor, nor a war hero. His claims to have studied with mystics in China, Tibet and India are entirely false. He was asked to leave a civil engineering degree course for poor scholarship, failed his atomic physics course, and his only visits to the mystic East were on two brief teenage holidays to China. Hubbard never graduated from any college or university.

Hubbard told many contradictory stories about his life, his exploits growing larger with each passing year. In an autobiography published shortly after World War Two, Hubbard admitted that his "war wound" was a fall down a ship's ladder, rather than the machine-gunbullet wounds he would later claim. His claims of being left “crippled and blinded” from war injuries have been disproved. In fact, he was treated for and obtained a partial disability rating based on a stomach ulcer. He blatantly claimed military service that has since been disproven and claimed military medals that US Navy documentation clearly shows he did not earn.

Throughout his lifetime Hubbard denied both wives and children. During a rare television interview, his “I had no second wife” statement was false. Documentation has shown that he married second wife Sara Northrup bigamously, having failed to divorce his first wife, Polly Grubbs, abandoning her and their two children. He denied parenting his third child, Alexis, even after having kidnapped her from her mother during their contentious relationship. After third wife Mary Sue, mother of four more of Hubbard's seven children, was released from prison Hubbard never saw or spoke to her directly again.

Although Scientologists campaign against drug abuse, through a group called Narconon, Hubbard was a self-confessed barbiturate user, who experimented freely with drugs, even publicly recommending the use of amphetamines or "speed". In addition, he was well known to be a heavy user of alcohol. Hubbard chain-smoked over a hundred cigarettes a day, unable to break the habit, despite the claims made for his drug rehab group.

Hubbard called his cure for psychosis an “isolation watch”. Scientologists call it “baby-watching”. The person is kept isolated and must not be communicated to in any way. A scandal erupted at Scientology's Florida headquarters, when Scientologist Lisa McPherson died during an isolation watch, allegedly headed by current cult leader, David Miscavige.

Scientologists undertake hundreds of hours of "counseling”, at times paying $1000 an hour. Imbedded in the counseling - called "auditing" within Scientology - are several different forms of hypnosis – techniques of repetition, fixation and mimicry – which all heighten suggestibility and undermine the critical faculties. Indeed, in a 1955 letter, Hubbard offered his "brainwashing" techniques to the FBI.

While being promised that through Scientology individuals will regain their "self-determinism”, Scientology actually leads to unquestioning acceptance of Hubbard's belief system and the erosion of independent thought and compassion. To complete the elaborate and lengthy steps of Hubbard's "Bridge to Total Freedom" takes years and costs in the region of $500,000. Some Scientologists have lost their homes and businesses to pay for increasingly expensive courses.

With the secret "Upper Levels" Scientologists seek to achieve supernatural powers that are promised to them. Thousands of former Scientologists who have taken these courses since the 1960s can attest that the techniques are ineffective, leading many to a progressive dissociation from reality and sometimes delusions of psychic abilities. Despite much boasting, no Scientologist has yet been shown to demonstrate supernatural powers.

Often, recruitment into Scientology begins with a personality test. The "Oxford Capacity Analysis" was written by a former merchant seaman, unschooled in psychology. The 200 question test has no connection with Oxford University, and demands extensive personal information. The Scientologists have a long history of using material supposedly received in confidence to harass former members.

Scientology staff members work very long hours for very little pay - often 90 hours per week for less than $30. Scientology is governed by the Sea Organization, members of which wear pseudo-naval uniforms, including campaign ribbons. Often they are allowed to see their children for only an hour, once every two weeks. The children are brought up in the "Cadet Organization" where they are taught absolute obedience to Scientology. Because the Sea Organization does not want its members to be distracted by parenthood, many female members have been subjected to harsh and relentless persuasion by cult officials until they terminate their pregnancies.

When their production statistics fall, Sea Organization members are put onto a diet of rice and beans, sometimes for months on end. Miscreants are moved to "pigs berthing". If this punishment fails, the offender is put into the "Rehabilitation Project Force" or RPF. Membership of the RPF labor camp often lasts for years. "RPFers" eat table scraps, sleep even shorter hours than the rest of the staff, may not speak unless spoken to, work long hours at menial tasks such as toilet cleaning with a toothbrush, and must obey all orders without question or hesitation. They must often spend five hours a day confessing the "evil purposes" of their supposed previous incarnations and their "crimes" against Hubbard or Scientology. The RPF is a testimony to the exploitative persuasion techniques of Scientology. It is based upon the thought-reform camps of Mao's China.

Scientologists have been involved in many criminal activities. Eleven, including Hubbard's wife Mary Sue, were imprisoned in the US for infiltrating government agencies and stealing files, including Interpol files on terrorism. During the course of these activities Scientologists bugged and burgled government offices around the world. Mary Sue Hubbard signed a full confession of more than 200 pages and served a year in federal prison.

Scientology is well known for its tireless "fair game" campaigns against critics. For instance, Hubbard ordered that cartoonist Jim Berry, creator of the “Berry’s World” cartoons, be ruined for simply mentioning Scientology in a single cartoon. According to the private investigator who ran the campaign for Scientology, $150,000 was spent on following respected British journalist Russell Miller who wrote the revealing unauthorized Hubbard biography “Bare-faced Messiah”. American journalist Paulette Cooper wrote an unflattering portrait of Hubbard and was then framed for a bomb threat by Scientology. Defector Pat Broeker, a former Hubbard right-hand man, was tailed by private investigators for 24 years after leaving the church, at a cost of over $10 million to the patrons of Scientology.

Anyone who speaks out against the cult is labeled a "Suppressive Person" and may be subjected to "fair game" harassment. As a result of this type of harassment Scientologists have been found guilty of kidnapping and false imprisonment. A French court has judged Scientology to be fraudulent. Scientology has been found guilty of libel against Canadian judge, Casey Hill.

Scientology frequently splits up families. This stems from “disconnection”, where Scientologists are forbidden to speak to anyone who is critical of Scientology. Numerous former Scientologists have been estranged from their children and other family members for decades or more. These same former members often take years to recover from the highly invasive techniques of Scientology. Most are unaware that their critical thinking abilities and emotional faculties have been interfered with by Scientology using powerful hypnotic techniques during auditing sessions in which they participated.


------------------
Note: Reformatting using Word did not fully carry over to the formatting used for this board. I've gone back in and corrected errors, but if you see anything I missed, just let me know.
 
Last edited:
M

Moderator 3

Guest
Here is a proposed "cleaned up and slightly expanded in places" version of the above. It is still fairly long and will likely generate a "too long, didn't read" reaction in some. I also corrected a few spelling, punctuation and formatting errors.

...

Good job! :thumbsup:
It's more likely it'll generate tl;cc (too long;couldn't confront). :)

PS: typos where spaces are omitted eg:in the second last paragraph "thecult". There are a few of them throughout the doc, it's probably all that cut and paste.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Gib

Crusader
Good job! :thumbsup:
It's more likely it'll generate tl;cc (too long;couldn't confront). :)

PS: typos where spaces are omitted eg:in the second last paragraph "thecult". There are a few of them throughout the doc, it's probably all that cut and paste.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Rose

maybe not

640px-Scholl-Denkmal%2C_M%C3%BCnchen.jpg
 
M

Moderator 3

Guest
My tl;cc (too long;couldn't confront) point was; I can't envision still-in scientologists being either willing or able to confront the information in that leaflet. Still, I live in hope. :)
 

ThetanExterior

Gold Meritorious Patron
In the last paragraph of the leaflet quoted in the OP, it says that Scientology forbids membership to homosexuals - which surely isn't true.

But I notice it isn't included in the reformatted version.

Apart from that, it's very good and hard-hitting IMO.:thumbsup:
 

strativarius

Inveterate gnashnab & snoutband
Here is a proposed "cleaned up and slightly expanded in places" version of the above. It is still fairly long and will likely generate a "too long, didn't read" reaction in some. I also corrected a few spelling, punctuation and formatting errors.

Note: Reformatting using Word did not fully carry over to the formatting used for this board. I've gone back in and corrected errors, [highlight]but if you see anything I missed, just let me know.[/highlight]
I didn't read it all DeeAnna but it's 'Aleister' Crowley, not Alastair. The original version is correct.
 
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i-Betty

Patron
Thanks so much - I've added spaces after the semi-colons so the links at the bottom are now clickable :)

I'll check with Jon for clarification on a) the matter of homosexuals being barred, and b) being an explorer.

Sorry if there were errors with formatting! I had about 10 minutes to copy-paste from Jon's email and get it posted everywhere before the kids came home and demanded pancakes with menaces so that would explain why it might be messy :eyeroll:

I will add 3 small additions here and to the OP.

Thanks so much for your help, all.

1. "Bonnie & Richard counter-sued, because of the cult's published response. The cult dropped its case, apologised in open court, paid 55k in damages & indemnified R&B against future libel." - JA

2.
"The cult gave an undertaking to the court that none of its entities will ever sue B&R for anything they choose to say. The undertaking is sealed." - JA

3. "
The court agreement (I was there in person to hear it): http://www.newsfrombree.co.uk/apology.htm - Hartley Patterson
 

i-Betty

Patron
Updated to add responses from Jon Atack:

1. "The point [about homosexuality within Scientology not being barred] is technically valid, though not one of the gay people I've known who were in the cult were active sexually, because of the prohibition."

2. "Hubbard was also a member of the National Geographic but was no geographer. His only flag was for the Alaskan trip which consisted of sitting in Ketchikan and precisely zero exploring."

(That last bit made me laugh!
:happydance: )
 
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