List of Questions to Insiders

chriscal12

New Member
First of all, I was never in Scientology. I have some friends who are dedicated public scientologists, but that is the extent of my personal involvement.

Thank you all for the work you have done in speaking and writing about church abuses. I have always been interested in the history of the church, but in the past few months I have become much more captivated by the story.

I have been reading more and doing research, and I have made a list of questions I am interested in, but have not seen answered. If anyone here would like to share some of their memories and insights, even if only to address one or two of these questions, I would be very grateful : )

Here are my questions:

1. In 1999 Modern Library published a public poll of the 100 greatest novels of the 20th century, as well as a list of the 100 greatest nonfiction books of the 20th century (They also released similar lists from their editorial staff, but those were separate). The top ten of the novels list included three Hubbard novels, and the top ten of the nonfiction list featured Dianetics. As far as you know, was the Church of Scientology involved in any kind of “vote bombing” campaign, or did this represent genuine popularity?

2. I know that David Miscavige directed people to lie to the media about his own physical abuse, but how would he actually phrase this behind closed doors? Would he ever acknowledge that he was asking people to lie? Would he acknowledge in private that he had attacked people. Or did he create an atmosphere, even behind the scenes, that these allegations were untrue?

3. Related to the above, how did other staff members who knew about Miscavige’s abuse talk about it when he was not around? Was it the kind of thing that you just did not talk about with each other, or was there private complaining?

4. I know that Ron Miscavige Sr. escaped and is allegedly writing an expose. And I know that Tommy Davis and Jessica Feshbach have (possibly) routed out, but have not spoken against the church. Besides these people, who would you guess will be the next two or three high profile scientologists to leave and speak out?

5. A few questions about South Park: What was the reaction inside the church when the Trapped in the Closet episode aired in November 2005? Were Matt Stone and Trey Parker ever sued, investigated, or harassed? Was Isaac Hayes pressured to leave the show by the church, or was that all his decision? And as far as you know, is there any truth to the claim that Tom Cruise, “threatened to back out of his promotional obligations for the Paramount Pictures film Mission: Impossible III if Viacom, the owner of both Comedy Central and Paramount, allowed a repeat of the episode to air.” (Wikipedia)?

6. Do you know anything about the Church’s battle with Wikipedia? Was Miscavige heavily involved planning the “edit wars”? What was his general reaction to the advent of Wikipedia?

7. Do you believe that Heber Jentzsch or Shelley Miscavige (or any other officials in their positions) are being held against their will? That is, are they in something more like a “prison of belief” or a literal prison?

8. In a Surviving Scientology Radio Podcast, Claire Headley claimed that Shelley Miscavige was at one time afraid that Dave Miscavige was going to blow. Do you know anything about that? Was there ever a time when it seemed to you like Dave wanted out?

9. When I picture a typical wealthy and hierarchical organization, I picture a large mass of followers/employees/subjects on the bottom, and a small class of rich and privileged elites at the top. In contrast, the picture I have of the Church of Scientology is a large mass of followers on the bottom, and literally one rich and privileged person at the top. Am I right in thinking that David Miscavige is the only person in upper Scientology management who lives a life of luxury? Not counting external contractors, such as church lawyers and such, do any other high level scientology officials live the good life, or is it just Dave?

10. What do you think of some of L. Ron Hubbard Jr.’s more outlandish claims, such as that LRH believed he was Satan, was importing drugs with the help of organized crime, was selling secrets to the KGB, and at one time planned to procure an atomic bomb?

Thanks to anyone who feels like weighing in on these questions!
 
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Dulloldfart

Squirrel Extraordinaire
Impressive questions!

I can't really help much, though, beyond expressing opinions. On #1 it is too outlandish not to have been manipulated one way or another by the cult.

Paul
 
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Leland

Crusader
I would assume that any Public Scientologist ...and therefore any Cult Staff or Sea Org.....would have to admit that there were always lavish events at which LRH fiction books were released....and programs were is place to sell them to public cult members....

There were massive pushes to get LRH fiction books sold....and onto the NY Times best seller lists.

I'm was not in the loop to know any specifics....but sure was on the receiving end of that selling pressure.

There were also programs to sell the Dianetics book......ongoing ....at all times....

I was in the Cult from 1972 until 2001.....and during that time, there were always programs to sell the dianetics book.....

Dianetics was THE book to sell.....

There were numerous programs for Cult members to buy LRH books....and donate them to Libraries....
 

OutToe83

Patron with Honors
I'm not qualified to weigh in on the other questions, but I can corroborate on what Paul said: I was an avid SF (aka Sci-Fi) reader when I got involved in $cientology around 1974-ish. I had read loads of books by the great SF writers of LRH's generation--John Campbell, Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov, Piers Anthony, E.E. "Doc" Smith, and of course Robert H. Heinlein, along with a dozen others...but I had never heard of LRH until I joined the Church.

He did manage to eke out a living selling SF, like a lot of other obscure writers--it was much in demand in his day, and anyone with any writing talent could--but he was definitely third tier, at best. I only read his work after being introduced to it in the Church, and at that time I was under the spell--but even then, I didn't consider his work in the same league as the greats I mentioned above.

While I was involved in $cn, mid-to-late 70's, I participated in buying his SF books (Battlefield Earth was the only one I remember being available at the time) and doing tricks like calling bookstores (along with dozens of other $cibots) to reserve a copy of DMSMH, to create an artificial demand that was supposed to put it on shelves. People tend to buy a book when they see it displayed with lots of copies--it must be popular, and therefore worth reading, right? That's the theory, and whether it worked or not, I can testify that FCDC managed those campaigns among their staff, volunteers and other public zealots.

LRH was a competent SF writer, but he wasn't First Tier like Heinlein, Campbell, Asimov and the rest. He wasn't even 2nd tier. And Dianetics was sold aggressively by staff and volunteer hawkers on streets, shopping malls, anywhere zealots like I could find a public place we wouldn't be kicked out of--not because people were interested in buying it. It's a fair bet that a lot of people bought the book just to get rid of us, and lot of those DMSMH books were trash-canned without being opened.

So, yeah, Paul is right: There's no way any of LRH's books come up in any top ten list without cult manipulation. And the cult has always aggressively sent out its minions to manipulate public opinion, often covertly and dishonestly.

Ex-Minion
 

Enthetan

Master of Disaster
1. In 1999 Modern Library published a public poll of the 100 greatest novels of the 20th century, as well as a list of the 100 greatest nonfiction books of the 20th century (They also released similar lists from their editorial staff, but those were separate). The top ten of the novels list included three Hubbard novels, and the top ten of the nonfiction list featured Dianetics. As far as you know, was the Church of Scientology involved in any kind of “vote bombing” campaign, or did this represent genuine popularity?

Scn is notorious for doing whatever is necessary to influence perception of popularity.

When I was on staff, and "Have You Lived Before This Life" came out in hardback, we were sent to certain bookstores to purchase the book. We brought them back, were reimbursed, and the books went on the org bookstore shelves.

What we were told at the time was that bookstores typically buy three copies or so of new releases, and if they sold quickly the bookstores would order a bunch more. I'm also sure that the org knew which particular bookstores were sampled for the NY Times "best seller" lists.
 

Enthetan

Master of Disaster
7. Do you believe that Heber Jentzsch or Shelley Miscavige (or any other officials in their positions) are being held against their will? That is, are they in something more like a “prison of belief” or a literal prison?

I believe they are psychologically being held against their will, as well as physically.

To be held against your will, is to have somebody threaten you with unacceptable consequences if you try to leave. Those consequences could involve pain or death. Those consequences can also involve being shunned by everyone they have known, and being thrust out into a world they may feel unable to cope with.

I think Shelley and Heber face both physical and psychological constraints on their leaving, in that if a police officer came into Int Base on a wellness check, and asked a prisoner of the Hole whether they wanted to leave, they would likely say "no", partially because they are afraid of being Declared, and partially because they might be afraid it was all a trick to test them.

People who have spent too much time in a prison develop "institutional syndrome", where they become unable to cope with living independently of the structured life they have known for so long. Marc Headley, in his book "Blown for Good", describes his difficulties adjusting to the outside world, after having been in the Sea Org for 15 years, from the age of 16.
 

hummingbird

Patron with Honors
To be held against your will, is to have somebody threaten you with unacceptable consequences if you try to leave. Those consequences could involve pain or death. Those consequences can also involve being shunned by everyone they have known, and being thrust out into a world they may feel unable to cope with.

IMHO, what's added into the mix, is how it's drilled into you that $cn is humanity's only hope. That if you leave, you will die and die and die a million deaths. It's worse than the hell that Christians threaten you with if you don't toe the line. So, when you're out there trying to get a job, get an apartment, pull a life together, a part of you is convinced that you've killed your spiritual future, so what does it matter? It takes quite some time to shake that off.
 

Dean Blair

Silver Meritorious Patron
Knowing what I do about the cherch of Scientology I would have to say that they manipulated the outcome that you present in your first question. There is no way it was not somehow rigged. Scientology is just not popular.

Your second question is answered by David Miscavige's favorite HCOB. The responsibilities of leaders written by the fat man. Here is a link that may help.

http://tonyortega.org/2013/11/21/th...logys-worship-of-ruthlessness/comment-page-1/

Question number seven I would say that they are both held against their wills and are also held by their beliefs in Scientology so that it is a prison within a prison. If either Shelly or Heber were to ask to leave they would be physically restrained just as has happened with so many others before them.

On your question nine: In addition to David Miscavige I would suggest that Tom Cruise has also benefited from being connected to the wee one. There was a time when others in the Hierarchy were rewarded with big bonuses and perks but those days are long gone. Now its just Dave and Tom.

On your last question L Ron Hubbard did believe he was Satan as stated by L Ron Hubbard Jr. Hubbard hisself claimed this on the original OT 8 materials. As far as you other speculations in question ten I am uncertain but I am certain that Scientology is always much worse than you had imagined so all of the claims by Nibs could be true.

First of all, I was never in Scientology. I have some friends who are dedicated public scientologists, but that is the extent of my personal involvement.

Thank you all for the work you have done in speaking and writing about church abuses. I have always been interested in the history of the church, but in the past few months I have become much more captivated by the story.

I have been reading more and doing research, and I have made a list of questions I am interested in, but have not seen answered. If anyone here would like to share some of their memories and insights, even if only to address one or two of these questions, I would be very grateful : )

Here are my questions:

1. In 1999 Modern Library published a public poll of the 100 greatest novels of the 20th century, as well as a list of the 100 greatest nonfiction books of the 20th century (They also released similar lists from their editorial staff, but those were separate). The top ten of the novels list included three Hubbard novels, and the top ten of the nonfiction list featured Dianetics. As far as you know, was the Church of Scientology involved in any kind of “vote bombing” campaign, or did this represent genuine popularity?

2. I know that David Miscavige directed people to lie to the media about his own physical abuse, but how would he actually phrase this behind closed doors? Would he ever acknowledge that he was asking people to lie? Would he acknowledge in private that he had attacked people. Or did he create an atmosphere, even behind the scenes, that these allegations were untrue?

3. Related to the above, how did other staff members who knew about Miscavige’s abuse talk about it when he was not around? Was it the kind of thing that you just did not talk about with each other, or was there private complaining?

4. I know that Ron Miscavige Sr. escaped and is allegedly writing an expose. And I know that Tommy Davis and Jessica Feshbach have (possibly) routed out, but have not spoken against the church. Besides these people, who would you guess will be the next two or three high profile scientologists to leave and speak out?

5. A few questions about South Park: What was the reaction inside the church when the Trapped in the Closet episode aired in November 2005? Were Matt Stone and Trey Parker ever sued, investigated, or harassed? Was Isaac Hayes pressured to leave the show by the church, or was that all his decision? And as far as you know, is there any truth to the claim that Tom Cruise, “threatened to back out of his promotional obligations for the Paramount Pictures film Mission: Impossible III if Viacom, the owner of both Comedy Central and Paramount, allowed a repeat of the episode to air.” (Wikipedia)?

6. Do you know anything about the Church’s battle with Wikipedia? Was Miscavige heavily involved planning the “edit wars”? What was his general reaction to the advent of Wikipedia?

7. Do you believe that Heber Jentzsch or Shelley Miscavige (or any other officials in their positions) are being held against their will? That is, are they in something more like a “prison of belief” or a literal prison?

8. In a Surviving Scientology Radio Podcast, Claire Headley claimed that Shelley Miscavige was at one time afraid that Dave Miscavige was going to blow. Do you know anything about that? Was there ever a time when it seemed to you like Dave wanted out?

9. When I picture a typical wealthy and hierarchical organization, I picture a large mass of followers/employees/subjects on the bottom, and a small class of rich and privileged elites at the top. In contrast, the picture I have of the Church of Scientology is a large mass of followers on the bottom, and literally one rich and privileged person at the top. Am I right in thinking that David Miscavige is the only person in upper Scientology management who lives a life of luxury? Not counting external contractors, such as church lawyers and such, do any other high level scientology officials live the good life, or is it just Dave?

10. What do you think of some of L. Ron Hubbard Jr.’s more outlandish claims, such as that LRH believed he was Satan, was importing drugs with the help of organized crime, was selling secrets to the KGB, and at one time planned to procure an atomic bomb?

Thanks to anyone who feels like weighing in on these questions!
 

Enthetan

Master of Disaster
9. When I picture a typical wealthy and hierarchical organization, I picture a large mass of followers/employees/subjects on the bottom, and a small class of rich and privileged elites at the top. In contrast, the picture I have of the Church of Scientology is a large mass of followers on the bottom, and literally one rich and privileged person at the top. Am I right in thinking that David Miscavige is the only person in upper Scientology management who lives a life of luxury? Not counting external contractors, such as church lawyers and such, do any other high level scientology officials live the good life, or is it just Dave?

As of my Sea Org days in the 1980's, things got better the further up you went.

At the bottom, in the EPF, I found myself crammed into a small room filled with quadruple-decker bunk beds, as many as would fit and still leave a narrow passage to get to your bed. There was a fan blowing continually to push out the stale air, otherwise the room would become unlivable.

Going up, if single you get a room you share with a few other guys, if married you and your wife get a small room. This was a big incentive to get married, and I almost did it, just to have to only share my room with one other person.

If you are a Sea org executive, you get kids from the Cadet Org cleaning your room for you.

So it generally got better as you went up the hierarchy.

If you became an executive, you had the chance to have as good a lifestyle as a Burger King shift manager. Except for the hours.
 

Knows

Gold Meritorious Patron
First of all, I was never in Scientology. I have some friends who are dedicated public scientologists, but that is the extent of my personal involvement.

Thank you all for the work you have done in speaking and writing about church abuses. I have always been interested in the history of the church, but in the past few months I have become much more captivated by the story.

I have been reading more and doing research, and I have made a list of questions I am interested in, but have not seen answered. If anyone here would like to share some of their memories and insights, even if only to address one or two of these questions, I would be very grateful : )

Here are my questions:

1. In 1999 Modern Library published a public poll of the 100 greatest novels of the 20th century, as well as a list of the 100 greatest nonfiction books of the 20th century (They also released similar lists from their editorial staff, but those were separate). The top ten of the novels list included three Hubbard novels, and the top ten of the nonfiction list featured Dianetics. As far as you know, was the Church of Scientology involved in any kind of “vote bombing” campaign, or did this represent genuine popularity?

2. I know that David Miscavige directed people to lie to the media about his own physical abuse, but how would he actually phrase this behind closed doors? Would he ever acknowledge that he was asking people to lie? Would he acknowledge in private that he had attacked people. Or did he create an atmosphere, even behind the scenes, that these allegations were untrue?

3. Related to the above, how did other staff members who knew about Miscavige’s abuse talk about it when he was not around? Was it the kind of thing that you just did not talk about with each other, or was there private complaining?

4. I know that Ron Miscavige Sr. escaped and is allegedly writing an expose. And I know that Tommy Davis and Jessica Feshbach have (possibly) routed out, but have not spoken against the church. Besides these people, who would you guess will be the next two or three high profile scientologists to leave and speak out?

5. A few questions about South Park: What was the reaction inside the church when the Trapped in the Closet episode aired in November 2005? Were Matt Stone and Trey Parker ever sued, investigated, or harassed? Was Isaac Hayes pressured to leave the show by the church, or was that all his decision? And as far as you know, is there any truth to the claim that Tom Cruise, “threatened to back out of his promotional obligations for the Paramount Pictures film Mission: Impossible III if Viacom, the owner of both Comedy Central and Paramount, allowed a repeat of the episode to air.” (Wikipedia)?

6. Do you know anything about the Church’s battle with Wikipedia? Was Miscavige heavily involved planning the “edit wars”? What was his general reaction to the advent of Wikipedia?

7. Do you believe that Heber Jentzsch or Shelley Miscavige (or any other officials in their positions) are being held against their will? That is, are they in something more like a “prison of belief” or a literal prison?

8. In a Surviving Scientology Radio Podcast, Claire Headley claimed that Shelley Miscavige was at one time afraid that Dave Miscavige was going to blow. Do you know anything about that? Was there ever a time when it seemed to you like Dave wanted out?

9. When I picture a typical wealthy and hierarchical organization, I picture a large mass of followers/employees/subjects on the bottom, and a small class of rich and privileged elites at the top. In contrast, the picture I have of the Church of Scientology is a large mass of followers on the bottom, and literally one rich and privileged person at the top. Am I right in thinking that David Miscavige is the only person in upper Scientology management who lives a life of luxury? Not counting external contractors, such as church lawyers and such, do any other high level scientology officials live the good life, or is it just Dave?

10. What do you think of some of L. Ron Hubbard Jr.’s more outlandish claims, such as that LRH believed he was Satan, was importing drugs with the help of organized crime, was selling secrets to the KGB, and at one time planned to procure an atomic bomb?

Thanks to anyone who feels like weighing in on these questions!

Hubbard bought his own books to "boost" his pr. That is all you need to know - Hubbard was a con, a thief, a liar, a crazy psycho that duped everyone including himself.
 

Churchill

Gold Meritorious Patron
Both Tony Ortega's blog, www.tonyortega.org and ESMB have "Search" features that are very helpful with regard to specific questions like the ones you pose.

Hubbard's claim, on the original (disastrous) version of OT 8 that he was Lucifer, although denied by the "Church," was addressed at great length at the Toronto Conference

by very knowledgable people. I'd strongly recommend that you watch those videos once they are made available.



Am I correct in assuming that you have read Going Clear and viewed the HBO Documentary as well?

Regarding your question #2, you should watch the Anderson Cooper 360 interview.
 
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chriscal12

New Member
Both Tony Ortega's blog, www.tonyortega.org and ESMB have "Search" features that are very helpful with regard to specific questions like the ones you pose.

Hubbard's claim, on the original (disastrous) version of OT 8 that he was Lucifer, although denied by the "Church," was addressed at great length at the Toronto Conference

by very knowledgable people. I'd strongly recommend that you watch those videos once they are made available.



Am I correct in assuming that you have read Going Clear and viewed the HBO Documentary as well?

Regarding your question #2, you should watch the Anderson Cooper 360 interview.

Thank you, I have and will continue use to explore Tony Ortega's site.

What is the Toronto Conference, and do you know when video will be available?

And yes, I read and watched Going Clear, as well as Anderson Cooper's special. All very interesting, but I don't remember 360 addressing Miscavige's attitude behind closed doors. Did I miss it?
 

Billy Blinder

Patron with Honors
First of all, I was never in Scientology. I have some friends who are dedicated public scientologists, but that is the extent of my personal involvement.

Thank you all for the work you have done in speaking and writing about church abuses. I have always been interested in the history of the church, but in the past few months I have become much more captivated by the story.

I have been reading more and doing research, and I have made a list of questions I am interested in, but have not seen answered. If anyone here would like to share some of their memories and insights, even if only to address one or two of these questions, I would be very grateful : )

Here are my questions:

1. In 1999 Modern Library published a public poll of the 100 greatest novels of the 20th century, as well as a list of the 100 greatest nonfiction books of the 20th century (They also released similar lists from their editorial staff, but those were separate). The top ten of the novels list included three Hubbard novels, and the top ten of the nonfiction list featured Dianetics. As far as you know, was the Church of Scientology involved in any kind of “vote bombing” campaign, or did this represent genuine popularity?

2. I know that David Miscavige directed people to lie to the media about his own physical abuse, but how would he actually phrase this behind closed doors? Would he ever acknowledge that he was asking people to lie? Would he acknowledge in private that he had attacked people. Or did he create an atmosphere, even behind the scenes, that these allegations were untrue?

3. Related to the above, how did other staff members who knew about Miscavige’s abuse talk about it when he was not around? Was it the kind of thing that you just did not talk about with each other, or was there private complaining?

4. I know that Ron Miscavige Sr. escaped and is allegedly writing an expose. And I know that Tommy Davis and Jessica Feshbach have (possibly) routed out, but have not spoken against the church. Besides these people, who would you guess will be the next two or three high profile scientologists to leave and speak out?

5. A few questions about South Park: What was the reaction inside the church when the Trapped in the Closet episode aired in November 2005? Were Matt Stone and Trey Parker ever sued, investigated, or harassed? Was Isaac Hayes pressured to leave the show by the church, or was that all his decision? And as far as you know, is there any truth to the claim that Tom Cruise, “threatened to back out of his promotional obligations for the Paramount Pictures film Mission: Impossible III if Viacom, the owner of both Comedy Central and Paramount, allowed a repeat of the episode to air.” (Wikipedia)?

6. Do you know anything about the Church’s battle with Wikipedia? Was Miscavige heavily involved planning the “edit wars”? What was his general reaction to the advent of Wikipedia?

7. Do you believe that Heber Jentzsch or Shelley Miscavige (or any other officials in their positions) are being held against their will? That is, are they in something more like a “prison of belief” or a literal prison?

8. In a Surviving Scientology Radio Podcast, Claire Headley claimed that Shelley Miscavige was at one time afraid that Dave Miscavige was going to blow. Do you know anything about that? Was there ever a time when it seemed to you like Dave wanted out?

9. When I picture a typical wealthy and hierarchical organization, I picture a large mass of followers/employees/subjects on the bottom, and a small class of rich and privileged elites at the top. In contrast, the picture I have of the Church of Scientology is a large mass of followers on the bottom, and literally one rich and privileged person at the top. Am I right in thinking that David Miscavige is the only person in upper Scientology management who lives a life of luxury? Not counting external contractors, such as church lawyers and such, do any other high level scientology officials live the good life, or is it just Dave?

10. What do you think of some of L. Ron Hubbard Jr.’s more outlandish claims, such as that LRH believed he was Satan, was importing drugs with the help of organized crime, was selling secrets to the KGB, and at one time planned to procure an atomic bomb?

Thanks to anyone who feels like weighing in on these questions!

Have you asked these questions of your dedicated scientologists friends? I'd like to hear the survey results of your friends. :confused2:
 

chriscal12

New Member
Have you asked these questions of your dedicated scientologists friends? I'd like to hear the survey results of your friends. :confused2:

I would love to hear their answers too, but I would be afraid to ask. From the past experience of a mutual friend, the conversation would likely be extremely awkward, and might harm our relationship. The truth is, these are family friends, not close personal friends, so I'm not too interested in rocking this boat with them. It's a bummer that this fear is here, because I never hesitate to ask my Christian friends difficult theological questions, and none of them denies the various types of abuse and corruption that can and does go on in churches.
 

TheOriginalBigBlue

Gold Meritorious Patron
2. I know that David Miscavige directed people to lie to the media about his own physical abuse, but how would he actually phrase this behind closed doors? Would he ever acknowledge that he was asking people to lie? Would he acknowledge in private that he had attacked people. Or did he create an atmosphere, even behind the scenes, that these allegations were untrue?

3. Related to the above, how did other staff members who knew about Miscavige’s abuse talk about it when he was not around? Was it the kind of thing that you just did not talk about with each other, or was there private complaining?

7. Do you believe that Heber Jentzsch or Shelley Miscavige (or any other officials in their positions) are being held against their will? That is, are they in something more like a “prison of belief” or a literal prison?

9. When I picture a typical wealthy and hierarchical organization, I picture a large mass of followers/employees/subjects on the bottom, and a small class of rich and privileged elites at the top. In contrast, the picture I have of the Church of Scientology is a large mass of followers on the bottom, and literally one rich and privileged person at the top. Am I right in thinking that David Miscavige is the only person in upper Scientology management who lives a life of luxury? Not counting external contractors, such as church lawyers and such, do any other high level scientology officials live the good life, or is it just Dave?

2) The only people that he would have such a conversation with would be tried and proven followers who probably had shared culpability to defend and the context would be that it was done in the name of the cause under severe and immediate threat from malevolent influences. That he probably has fewer to no Scientology cohorts with which to have such an exchange could explain the reason there is no longer an official spokesperson other than high powered lawyers who are remunerated enough to ensure an ironclad attorney client privilege.

3) Imagine a totalitarian society where all speech and thought can be micromanaged and you have your answer. There is no questioning, expression of concern or doubt and you don't dare think it lest it comes up on the e-meter. "I see nuthing, I know nuthing".

7) Stockholmed by any other name plus a physical environment of actual total control or a convincing impression of it.

9) One person at the top under LRH and now DM. Everyone else subsists at the will of the one. No matter how high up one goes their benefits and good graces are only as good up to the moment they are not and they can be reduced to a virtual non-person in the RPF instantly. If people in DM's entourage live a better standard of living it is probably because DM wants the people around him to look good to make him look good more so than out of a sincere concern for their well being. A lot of very dedicated and competent people have evacuated INT since the early 80s. Whatever luxury was being offered clearly was not enough to offset the negatives.
 

NoName

A Girl Has No Name
On your question nine: In addition to David Miscavige I would suggest that Tom Cruise has also benefited from being connected to the wee one. There was a time when others in the Hierarchy were rewarded with big bonuses and perks but those days are long gone. Now its just Dave and Tom.

Stop exaggerating. Safi and Jelly also live very well. And I believe that they may even outrank TC, but that is unconfirmed.

Edit: Chriscal12 - since you are new, I'll explain- these are DM's beagles. They have SO uniforms complete with epaulettes and outrank all the executive strata. SO have to salute them. Yes, really.
 

programmer_guy

True Ex-Scientologist
Back in the 1970s & 1980s there was frequent encouragement to donate Scientology books to public and university libraries.

I had noticed that this had been done at the library at my old alma mater from people connected to the Riverside Mission.
 

NoName

A Girl Has No Name
BTW- can beagles get body thetans or do they just take a monthly chewable liver flavor pill to prevent it?
 

chriscal12

New Member
Stop exaggerating. Safi and Jelly also live very well. And I believe that they may even outrank TC, but that is unconfirmed.

Edit: Chriscal12 - since you are new, I'll explain- these are DM's beagles. They have SO uniforms complete with epaulettes and outrank all the executive strata. SO have to salute them. Yes, really.

Haha! I actually looked it up when you posted. Hilarious.
 
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