TG1

Angelic Poster
... and it bears roughly the relation to counseling psychology that chiropractic bears to medicine: it's a pseudo-scientific rival, and basically a scam.

Ouch, Student of Trinity. You really lost me with that statement. :no:

Although I'm a ready, happy consumer of medical care, there are some ailments (musculoskeletal discomforts) I've found chiropractic resolves much more readily and completely for me.

I also use and benefit from massage therapy.

I've also used physical rehabilitation therapists.

I will stipulate that some chiropractic practitioners are much better than others. But I've found the same is true of medical doctors, dentists, physical rehab therapists, psychologists and masseuses.

Have you experienced chiropractic care? If so, what was your own experience with it?

TG1
 

Lone Star

Crusader
Ouch, Student of Trinity. You really lost me with that statement. :no:

Although I'm a ready, happy consumer of medical care, there are some ailments (musculoskeletal discomforts) I've found chiropractic resolves much more readily and completely for me.

I also use and benefit from massage therapy.

I've also used physical rehabilitation therapists.

I will stipulate that some chiropractic practitioners are much better than others. But I've found the same is true of medical doctors, dentists, physical rehab therapists, psychologists and masseuses.

Have you experienced chiropractic care? If so, what was your own experience with it?

TG1

A talented chiropractor can work wonders. A bad one can mess you up. But it's certainly not a pseudo-science.
 

secretiveoldfag

Silver Meritorious Patron
Now we are getting somewhere. . .

Scientology is therefore merely a feeling one gets about Ron Hubbard's incomplete dissertation, wherein he only got as far as a pedantic articulation of an un-scientific thesis, a sci-fi antithesis and a glaringly absent synthesis--the aggregate of which he called "technology".

In that case is scientology not doomed to fracture and fragment ad infinitum into as many pieces as there are true believers?

I still believe the tech has a real and usually undesirable effect, even if this effect varies a lot. But this is a bit abstruse for me. :unsure:
 

secretiveoldfag

Silver Meritorious Patron
With the whole idea of Scientology being that you basically rehabilitate your basic personality, TR 0 does the job and is basically doable for everyone.

If you want to rehabilitate your basic personality there are safer ways of doing it than taking a chain saw to it.

What we need is a way of undoing the damage done by Hubbard's tech to a person's basic personality. I believe he wanted to damage people so much they would have nothing left in their heads but what he put there.

But I only see a little bit of this from the outside.
 

Caroline

Patron Meritorious
Caroline I've read several posts in this thread with great interest. I've been involved in both the Church and the Freezone and have seen first hand the mixed bag of results it produces. I don't forget how I witnessed people (in the FZ) being sick and unhappy, troubled in life, involved in battles and squabbles with others, off to handle 'body problems' with some specialist or other, continually obsessed about O/W's and older timer status.

When I hear a Scientologist say 'it works' I don't disagree with them, because workability to me only means that it does something. Doesn't mean that it's something good. Hubbards involvement in the occult is often dismissed off-hand by many in the FZ as irrelevant background history. But I feel that this involvement helped create a double edged sword in Scientology which has had horrendous effects on it's members past and present for decades. It has literally sent people quite mad.

I don't think exteriorisation and dissasociation are same thing unless extreme trauma caused the exteriorisation and this is where black magic steps in and things get nasty. Exteriorisation has been experienced by many of us and is part of many older philosophies. When trauma forces someone out of the body it is quite different.

I think you're making an important point. But according to Hubbard, exteriorization occurs with trauma as well. The Int RD addresses "engrams" supposedly associated with the phenomena of exteriorization and interiorization.

Hubbard said:
EXTERIORIZATION

Exteriorization is defined as the act of moving out of the body with or without full perception.

It is the fact of this act which proves that the individual is not a body but an individual. This discovery in 1952 proved beyond any question the existence of a thetan, that the individual was a thetan, not a body, and disproved that man was an animal, and that he was a spiritual being timeless and deathless.

Techniques have existed since 1952 that exteriorize a person. These are not now used because the person (a) still being aberrated and not Clear, soon returns to his body and (b) when audited thereafter has trouble.

This is a major problem a thetan sometimes has at death. How to exteriorize? He makes it eventually of course but he should be able to do so at once.

But, in my research, I found it unreasonable that a person would be hard to audit just because he had exteriorized and had reinteriorized. For he has obviously done just that at every death and birth and must have done so hundreds of billions of times. So why should a recent exteriorization then make him hard to audit? Yet it did.

My asking of that question was the first breakthrough. The rest soon followed.

Hubbard, L. R. (1971, 4 January). Interiorization Rundown Series 2R Exteriorization and High TA The Interiorization Rundown Revised. The Technical Bulletins of Dianetics and Scientology (Subject Vol. 3, pp. 467-475). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications, Inc.

Hubbard's "remedy is to audit out interiorizations (i.e. times the person went in)." From the same technical bulletin:

THE MISSED BEGINNING

What has happened here, as regards exteriorization is that we have concentrated on EXTERIORIZATION.

If one is IN something, he must have gotten into it.

Therefore the beginning of an exteriorization is the INTERIORIZATION.

The being went into something before he went out of it.

Exteriorization occurs at death. That’s an engram. Interiorization occurs at birth, that’s an engram.

So when somebody goes exterior he is actually liable to key in having gone interior in the first place.

Get it?

So when you exteriorize somebody or he exteriorizes during auditing he gets keyed in a bit and without having audited earlier INTERIORIZATIONS, he has been put in the last part (exteriorization) of an incident which began with Interiorization.

Not only are you touching on something (exteriorization) late on a chain (which has hundreds of billions of like incidents ahead of it), you are also touching something which is late in the incident (which began with interiorization).

On both counts then, the TA may go high.

THE REMEDY

The remedy is to audit out interiorizations.

If this is done, then the pc can be audited all you want after exteriorization.

Auditing the Interiorizations with R3RA, Quad or Triple Flows, restores the possibility of auditing a pc after an exteriorization has occurred in auditing.

Hubbard, L. R. (1971, 4 January). Interiorization Rundown Series 2R Exteriorization and High TA The Interiorization Rundown Revised. The Technical Bulletins of Dianetics and Scientology (Subject Vol. 3, pp. 467-475). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications, Inc.

I have experienced this trauma and 'implanting' (for want of a better word) with the FZ and so have a couple of other people I have spoken to. I have to admit that I was left quite unwell by this episode and whole thing which happened at about 4.00am was extremely disturbing. I'm sure there are others out there who have been in a similar positions, having the sensation of 'being watched' in and outside of the home when no-one is there physically, the feeling of being attacked, of things going missing from your home (in my case some OT stuff written up by an ex-Scio and quite rare).

That is a disturbing story. Thank you for letting us know. If you haven't done so yet, please consider writing this up in further detail, as it sounds like your account of the facts would be very helpful.
 

Caroline

Patron Meritorious
Vittorio,

Could you please give specifics as to what sort of trauma and implanting was used? This sounds very unusual. Was this in a session or are you talking about a psychic attack with nobody physically present?

Caroline, I don't see that the girl in that video even mentions that she is/was exterior. Looks more like being "blown out", which to me never was a state of exterior but a state of case being moved off of one. I agree that a person is vunerable when in such a state. Alan Walter had much to say about such and how it needed to be properly handled for the stability of the person.

As an auditor, I would have interpreted that kind of body language as "exterior" and I would have ended the session immediately, whether or not she said the word.

But you've made an interesting distinction between exterior and having some case move off. From the perspective of a pre-OT, sometimes what passes for exterior is a BT blowing off, and not the host. :unsure: The phenomena can be quite confusing, and can cause serious case trouble. Some NOTs indoc material:

Hubbard said:
“EXTERIOR” PERCEPTION

During this RD, or even while running OT III, a Pre-OT will sometimes get what is apparently “exterior perception”. As a BT is blowing, and while the Pre-OT has an attention unit on the BT, there can be a feedback of the BT’s perception to the Pre-OT. You may get the BT’s visio of the room or environment as the BT is leaving. This BT perception folds up quickly and ceases when the BT has blown. It is usually very brief and is quite different from OT perceptions (actual exterior perception). In fact to begin with objects tend to look rather thin and flimsy to an OT when exterior, as the body acts as a sort of collector and magnifier of perceptions and sensations. Some Pre-OTs tend to invalidate their own exterior perception because of this. But OT perception improves further up he line. It is necessary to handle all BTs and clusters first though.

Hubbard, L. R. (1978, 26 September). New Era Dianetics Series 4 WORD CLEARING AND INFORMATION FOR PRE-OTs ON NED FOR OTs. (Attachment #2).
 

Smilla

Ordinary Human
If you want to rehabilitate your basic personality there are safer ways of doing it than taking a chain saw to it.

What we need is a way of undoing the damage done by Hubbard's tech to a person's basic personality. I believe he wanted to damage people so much they would have nothing left in their heads but what he put there.*

But I only see a little bit of this from the outside.

*That's exactly so.
 

Caroline

Patron Meritorious
If you want to rehabilitate your basic personality there are safer ways of doing it than taking a chain saw to it.

What we need is a way of undoing the damage done by Hubbard's tech to a person's basic personality. I believe he wanted to damage people so much they would have nothing left in their heads but what he put there.

But I only see a little bit of this from the outside.

I agree. And in 1996, DM came out with a statement of our purpose as Scientologists: to be "the living embodiment of LRH tech." It gives me the creeps.

CSI said:
WELCOME TO THE GOLDEN AGE OF TECH

The dawning of a new age for all SCIENTOLOGISTS is here. The skills and knowledge vital to your eternity can be acquired faster and easier than you ever dreamed possible.

A new breed of auditor is at hand…and if you can read these paragraphs, that perfect auditor can be you.

Behind that statement is a path to auditing excellence that will turn you into the kind of SCIENTOLOGIST TM you’ve always wanted to be—a living embodiment of LRH TM tech.

It is a path you’ve always known you must travel, but never conceived it could be so effortless—so accessible.

For the fact is, whether or not you have ever touched an E-METER TM, you can be one of the best auditors on Earth—bar none.

That’s why, when we speak of a Golden Age of Tech, we are speaking of a new dawn illuminating the path to flawless application for every SCIENTOLOGIST on Earth—a new dawn of knowing and using pure truth.

CSI. (1996). Golden Age of Tech [Brochure]. Church of Scientology International. [PDF excerpt]
 

Claire Swazey

Spokeshole, fence sitter
Fluffy's take on Hubbard's intentions (and I bet this isn't what you'd expect from me

I personally don't believe Hubbard wanted to damage anyone, per se. Wait, now hear me out a sec...I'm probably not gonna say what some may think I would say:

I think Hubbard did want things for people that are harmful. Things that any normal person, anyone who stopped and thought about it- would say are harmful. Things he himself preached against.

But I think he rationalized and compartmentalized and justified.

I also think that when he created Scn theory, that he went into ivory tower mode about the word clearing, the drills and the auditing. I truly think that when he did that, that he was thinking of philosophy. I think he wasn't thinking about the RPF he asked to have created, or the RPF's RPF or the people he overboarded earlier that day or the insane freeloader debt policy.

That's compartmentalization.

It's also a gross indictment of Hubbard as a person and as a philosopher and it's why people are so pissed off at him and don't want anything to do with him or his writings or anything.

But I think where some of us (ok, everybody but me) and I may disagree is that when he was creating processes (like the lovely Grand Tour. The Grades, etc) and drills and study tech that he wasn't doing those things to fuck anyone up.

That doesn't mean Scn ology doesn't fuck people up, though.

Now, as to OT levels and FPRD stuff- I've heard (ok, seen) people say that Hubbard was "running his own case". I have come to believe that they are right.

I also think he was kinda guinea pigging us.

The preceding is a fluff-load of my personal opinions and should be taken as such. However, pats on the back and thumbs up and cyber chocolate are accepted and appreciated. :coolwink:
 

Gadfly

Crusader
Re: Fluffy's take on Hubbard's intentions (and I bet this isn't what you'd expect fro

The Grades, etc) and drills and study tech that he wasn't doing those things to fuck anyone up.

Study Tech?

Really?

What person in their right mind, who actually CARES about other people, instructs them to NEVER QUESTION anything about a subject? That is the exact OPPOSITE of a scientific approach, and takes one into the realm of faith and CRAZY faith-based religion (which Hubbard denied being). He said Scientology was a "religion", but a "scientifically-based religion", and said that it did NOT depend in any way on "belief" (when it very much does).

Creating THAT attitude in ANY person stifles the person. Creating an attitude in people where they are TOTALLY CERTAIN about something, and unwilling and unallowed from EVER examining the subject in a questioning manner is a MAJOR ROOT OF EVIL (not to mention stupidity).

Oh, I know, Hubbard didn't actually KNOW that he was causing that in others. My bad . . . . .

Hubbard would have had to have been WAY far stupidier than he actually was to NOT KNOW exactly what he was doing. :ohmy:
 
Re: Fluffy's take on Hubbard's intentions (and I bet this isn't what you'd expect fro

I personally don't believe Hubbard wanted to damage anyone, per se. Wait, now hear me out a sec...I'm probably not gonna say what some may think I would say:

I think Hubbard did want things for people that are harmful. Things that any normal person, anyone who stopped and thought about it- would say are harmful. Things he himself preached against.

But I think he rationalized and compartmentalized and justified.

I also think that when he created Scn theory, that he went into ivory tower mode about the word clearing, the drills and the auditing. I truly think that when he did that, that he was thinking of philosophy. I think he wasn't thinking about the RPF he asked to have created, or the RPF's RPF or the people he overboarded earlier that day or the insane freeloader debt policy.

That's compartmentalization.

It's also a gross indictment of Hubbard as a person and as a philosopher and it's why people are so pissed off at him and don't want anything to do with him or his writings or anything.

But I think where some of us (ok, everybody but me) and I may disagree is that when he was creating processes (like the lovely Grand Tour. The Grades, etc) and drills and study tech that he wasn't doing those things to fuck anyone up.

That doesn't mean Scn ology doesn't fuck people up, though.

Now, as to OT levels and FPRD stuff- I've heard (ok, seen) people say that Hubbard was "running his own case". I have come to believe that they are right.

I also think he was kinda guinea pigging us.

The preceding is a fluff-load of my personal opinions and should be taken as such. However, pats on the back and thumbs up and cyber chocolate are accepted and appreciated. :coolwink:

I actually agree with you.

I don't question his intentions; it is actually irrelevent and gets one nowhere.

It is the effects that matter.

Maybe his intentions were bad and maybe they were good, no one will ever know, and no would could ever know.

But he did dominate others and use them for his own purposes and created an organization to do the same.

But I am no saint and I am no angel and I am no god, so I can't really say for sure what his intentions were.

The Anabaptist Jacques
 

Awake

Patron
Ah yes, the much anticipated history of Scientology!!

I do hope he takes time to interview the old timers here on ESMB for that book. I guess I shouldn't hold my breath, but it'd be nice to see an honest, factual examination of the church from multiple points of view, pro and con.

Any idea when that book is scheduled to hit the market?

I know I'm coming in late on the chain with this thread.....but did you really say "honest, factual"? From Marty?????????? :no:
 

secretiveoldfag

Silver Meritorious Patron
Claire said: "I personally don't believe Hubbard wanted to damage anyone, per se."

I was remembering something I read somewhere here only a few days ago, an extract of the Playboy interview with Nibs, where he describes orgies, with multiple women, and his father using everything he had including hypnosis and drugs to crack their souls. He pondered the phrase and then repeated it, saying, Soul-cracking; that was exactly what it was. All his life Hubbard left a trail of damaged people, sucked dry to inflate his own ego.

Nibs put his life on the line to tell everything he could about his father, to warn people. If you read everything he said, and then read Hubbard's Affirmations I don't see how you can ever trust the man again, even in his nicest Eagle Scout uniform.
 

Infinite

Troublesome Internet Fringe Dweller
Claire said: "I personally don't believe Hubbard wanted to damage anyone, per se."

I was remembering something I read somewhere here only a few days ago, an extract of the Playboy interview with Nibs, where he describes orgies, with multiple women, and his father using everything he had including hypnosis and drugs to crack their souls. He pondered the phrase and then repeated it, saying, Soul-cracking; that was exactly what it was. All his life Hubbard left a trail of damaged people, sucked dry to inflate his own ego.

Nibs put his life on the line to tell everything he could about his father, to warn people. If you read everything he said, and then read Hubbard's Affirmations I don't see how you can ever trust the man again, even in his nicest Eagle Scout uniform.

Just to be a pedant, it was Penthouse not Playboy.

In terms of L Ron Hubbard not wanting to damage anyone, I'm reminded of this quote by Nibs from that article:

. . . Well, he [LRH] didn't really want people killed, because how could you really destroy them if you just killed them? What he wanted to do was to destroy their lives, their families, their reputations, their jobs, their money, everything. My father was the type of person who, when it came to destruction, wanted to keep you alive for as long as possible, to torture you, punish you. If he chose to destroy you, he would love to see you lying in the gutter, strung out on booze and drugs, rolling in your own vomit, with your wife and children gone forever: no job, no money. He'd enjoy walking by and kicking you and saying to other people, "Look what I did to this man!" He's the kind of man who would pull the wings off flies and watch them stumble around. You see, this fits in with his Scientology beliefs, also. He felt that if you just died, your spirit would go out and get another body to live in. By destroying an enemy that way, you'd be doing him a favor. You were letting him out from under the thumb of L. Ron. Hubbard, you see? . . .

. . . and John McMaster's sad fate.
 

Caroline

Patron Meritorious
Rathbun and his Independents are now promoting their new Xenu-as-metaphor PR handling or "acceptable truth." Here's an excerpt from Tony Ortega's review of Rathbun's book.

Tony Ortega said:
I'm OT, You're OT

At this point in Rathbun's book, we graduate to the "Operating Thetan" (OT) levels, and I have to admit that I was salivating for this portion of the book. (The highest levels of Scientology attainment, the OT levels can take years to reach and years more to complete, with fantastic prices.)

I give Rathbun a lot of credit for speaking openly (if a little cryptically) about the content of OT 3, the most notorious of all teachings in Scientology lore. You've probably seen the South Park episode about Xenu, the galactic overlord, so you probably already know that in OT 3, Hubbard explains that our world is infested with disembodied alien souls brought here 75 million years ago. The higher OT levels -- OT 4 through OT 8, largely involve exorcising these "body thetans" from your person so you can unleash your true potential.

And here, Rathbun explains, is one of the fundamental differences between church members, who are asked to accept the OT 3 story literally, and independents, who tell us that they can treat it as a metaphor. [...]

Ortega, T. (2012, 16 July) Breaking Away from the Church of Scientology: Reading Marty Rathbun's Manifesto. villagevoice.com Retrieved 16 July 2012 from http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2012/07/scientology_marty_rathbun_manifesto.php

The elephant in this room: With or without the "Xenu-as-metaphor" handling, Hubbard's underlying theory about Body Thetans, and the entire premise of his advanced technology STILL FAILS. There is no way that Scientologists can treat BTs as metaphors. If BTs are metaphors, then thetans and even Operating Thetans are metaphors.

Hubbard said:
For the purpose of clarity, by BODY THETAN is meant a thetan who is stuck to another thetan or body but is not in control.

A THETAN is, of course, a Scientology word using the Greek “Theta” which was the Greek symbol for thought or life.

An individual being such as a man is a thetan, he is not a body and he does not think because he has no brain.

A CLUSTER is a group of body thetans crushed or held together by some mutual bad experience.

Hubbard, L. R. (1970, 5 February) Definitions, Sect. III (OT 3 Course)

Hubbard said:
Body thetans are just thetans. When you get rid of one he goes off and possibly squares around, picks up a body or admires daisies. He is in fact a sort of cleared being.

He cannot fail to eventually, if not at once, regain many abilities. Many have been asleep for the last 75 million years.

A body thetan responds to any process any thetan responds to.

Hubbard, L. R. (1968, 4 May). Character of Body Thetans. (OT 3 Course)

Related ESMB thread: Body thetans
 

Veda

Sponsor
Rathbun and his Independents are now promoting their new Xenu-as-metaphor PR handling or "acceptable truth." Here's an excerpt from Tony Ortega's review of Rathbun's book.



The elephant in this room: With or without the "Xenu-as-metaphor" handling, Hubbard's underlying theory about Body Thetans, and the entire premise of his advanced technology STILL FAILS. There is no way that Scientologists can treat BTs as metaphors. If BTs are metaphors, then thetans and even Operating Thetans are metaphors.





Related ESMB thread: Body thetans

"Incidents" on the (or a) "time track," per Scientology "tech," are not metaphors either, of course, but literal "time, place, form, and event," duration, etc.

Metaphors don't "as-is."

J. Gordon Melton, then an employee of Scientology, first used the OT3/metaphor angle, and that was years ago, as I recall.

Has Tony Ortega fallen for Marty Rathbun's PR handling?

IMO, to no small extent, it was for people like Tony Ortega that Rathbun wrote this book, and for Independent Scientologists, so they would know what to say to annoying, excessively curious, "wogs."

Similar ploys have long been used by Scientology PRs. For example, this is what David Gaiman, then Public Relations Director for Scientology in England, told Paulette Cooper, in 1971, when asked about the billion year Sea Org contract:

From question/answer #19, in the 'Appendix' of Cooper's book:

19. (from Cooper) "DO THE SEA ORG PEOPLE SIGN A BILLION YEAR CONTRACT?"

(From Gaiman) "Never make an allegoric joke near literal minded humorless reporters."

Right now it's unclear to me whether or not Tony Ortega has been duped by the "Incident 2 is a metaphor"-angle.
 
In What is Wrong with Scientology Rathbun provides a statement of Scientology and the Scientology Bridge as he understands and delivers it, and as he advocates for Independent Scientologists around the world.

According to Rathbun, Scientology Inc.'s tech is now "reversed in application and effect," meaning essentially that Scientologists under the control of David Miscavige are applying Hubbard's tech in ways that cause harmful, not beneficial effects on people.

Rathbun runs what he calls an "Underground Railroad" for Scientologists who are leaving the control of David Miscavige and "Scientology Inc." (Rathbun: The Tipping Point for Scientology, Inc.) Rathbun and the Indies sell and deliver Scientology to these people, to supposedly remedy the harm that they experienced under DM.



I think this is a good issue to start with:



Thanks. JQ. First, here's the definition:



Rathbun's "rewording" comes under the category of "verbal tech" which is an ethics offense. (Introduction to Scientology Ethics.) Verbal Tech is classified as a "Misdemeanor" but since so much of Rathbun's book is "verbal tech" the offense would undoubtedly be upgraded to a "Crime" or "High Crime."



Rathbun also presents a theory in Chapter 1 about why verbal tech is okay, but this is just more squirreling, and blatant.

What you mentioned about Rathbun "presenting his theory that they're not to be taken literally" is a "Technical Degrade, which is a class of High Crime:"



One effect of advocating a non-literal approach to the Xenu story, for example, is that it invalidates Hubbard's claims and statements about his OT 3 research. Scientology has been selling the literal story since Hubbard came up with it.

So to now say the Xenu story (and therefore the process and level of OT 3) shouldn't be taken literally is like admitting that Hubbard (and at least some people in his technical hierarchy) knowingly implanted or caused to be implanted, false memories in thousands of Scientologists over decades, but "never mind, that was then." To illustrate this sentiment more exactly, I'll repeat this excerpt from another thread:

It's all a crock of shit. Rathbun just presents a kinder/gentler version of the bullshit. He's a new and improved version of Miscavige.
 

Caroline

Patron Meritorious
Here is a recent academic spin on the Xenu story, that the Scientologists doubtlessly fed the writer. From a paper published in Scientology (2009), edited by James R. Lewis.

Andreas Grűschloess said:
The spirit or soul unit, called the "thetan" according to Hubbard's terminology, can be compared to similar soul conceptions that became famous during the formation of esoteric movements: The Western strands of Theosophy and Esotericism had already introduced Indian style, "atman"-like concepts of the soul to Western spiritual seekers, and this concept of the soul was enlarged by UFO-related prophets and groups from the early 1950s onward in an inter-planetary style—so-called "star seeds" or "walk-ins" from outer space. Earth is a garden, where these spiritual implants were supposed to grow, to mature, in order to be eligible for further evolution into higher realms. I cannot go into the fascinating details of UFOlogical anthropologies, but I simply want to draw attention to the fact that Hubbard's idea of the person and its role in interstellar history is very, very close to other UFOlogical spiritual movements in the 1950s and later.25

This UFOlogical connection is explicitly apparent in the foundation myth of Scientology's "Operating Thetan" (OT) anthropology. According to the secret doctrines of Scientology—which are nowadays far from arcane, as information about court trials and other disclosures by former members appear in hundreds of pages on the Internet—there once was a fierce intergalactic ruler named Xenu, who brought millions of thetans to this Earth (which back then carried the name "Teegeack"), and that is how their (i.e., our) life started in this region of the universe ("sector nine"). Amazingly, this story, which forms the central core myth in OT level III initiation teachings, 26 was rewritten by Hubbard as a mere science fiction novel in the late 1970s. As such, it carries the title Revolt in the Stars, and it has so far not been officially published. Copies of the manuscript circulate every now and then on the Internet. It is an amazing piece and trustworthy in terms of Hubbard's authorship—according to style, phrasing, and content. 27 This oscillation between the production of mythic core
stories and mere fantasy tales is also a characteristic typical of modern esoteric traditions: Helena P. Blavatsky, for example, wrote fantasy tales beside her theosophical disclosures, 28 and Charles Hoy Fort's alternative, anomalistic science in his Book of the Damned (and the three follow-up volumes) 29 inspired fantasy authors like H. P. Lovecraft as well as esoteric seekers. Erich von Daniken, working along Charles Fort's lines, also oscillates between fantasy and fringe historiography/archaeology, and his "Ancient Astronaut" stories have often been often reabsorbed by esoteric and UFO-believing groups.30 The framework story in Hubbard's Revolt in the Stars does, by the way, include the idea of a time capsule in the vein of the Ancient Astronauts' scheme.31

But Scientologists always feel uneasy when compared with or related to UFO-believing groups, especially because many critics dismiss Hubbard for his pulp fiction and science fiction involvements. Far more prestigious for Scientology is the reference to Buddhism mentioned in many publications by Hubbard, as well as in contemporary Scientology books.

-------------------------

25. For example, "Mrs. Keech" and "Mr. Armstrong" (pseudonyms), of the millennial UFO group in the famous sociopsychological study When Prophecy Fails (1956), had both been involved in Dianetics and Scientology prior to their commitment to this esoteric movement.
26. Robert Kaufman, Inside Scientology (London: Olympia Press, 1972) was among the first (if not the first) to publish a disclosure of this mythic story. Nowadays, even copies of Hubbard's handwritten sheets containing this story are circulating on the Internet.
27. It contains Hubbard's typical imagery of women, an evil psychiatrist, on the other hand "loyal officers," and the usual Star Wars scenario inside a "Galactic Confederation." Compared to other published fictional writings by Hubbard, it appears very genuine. (Probably due to legal reasons, no existing copy could be located via Web searches at the moment.) The story contains the struggle between the intergalactic ruler Xenu and the "loyal officers" who, in the end, manage to overthrow his despotic rule after he murdered all disobedient subjects on the "extermination site" earth by bombing them on volcanoes (cf. esp. chapter 14).
28. Cf. Marco Frenschkowski, "Okkultismus und Phantastik: eine Studie zu ihrem verhaltnis am Beispiel der Helena Petrovna Blavatsky," in: Das Schwarze Geheimnis. Magazinfur unheimliche Literatur 4 (1999): 53-104. Or, take Heinlein's science fiction novel "Stranger in a Strange Land," which in turn inspired the formation of a neo-pagan movement calling itself actually "Church of all Worlds," like the neo-Martian religion in the novel. One could go on to the Star Trek culture, to Heaven's Gate, and the Raelians.
29. Charles Hoy Fort, The Book of the Damned (New York: Boni & Liveright, 1919); the books to follow were New Lands (1923), Lo! (1931), and Wild Talents (1932). There are several hypertext editions of the books available on the Internet: for example, see http://www.sacred-texts.com/fort (only books 1 and 2), or http://www.resologist.net/ (damnei.htm, landsei.htm, loei.htm and talentei.htm), prepared by a "Fortean" student.
30. Cf. my article " 'Ancient Astronaut' Narrations—A Popular Discourse on Our Religious Past," available online in Marburg Journal of Religion 11, 2006; http://web.uni-marburg.de/religionswissenschaft/journal/mjr/; for a slightly revised printed version see Fabula 48 (Berlin: W. de Gruyter, 2007), 205-228.
31. The framework story is located in our time: a strange object ("it might be something from outer space, it might be some archaeological wonder") is found on a U.S. beach, and after investigation it turns out to be a "time capsule" ("seventy-five million years old") containing an audiovisual record of the Xenu story. After listening to the record, the president of the United States denies its existence, pretending it was "just scrap metal."


Grűschloess, A. (2009). Scientology A New Age Religion. In J. R. Lewis (Ed.), Scientology. New York: Oxford University Press.

James R. Lewis names several well-known OSA personnel in Scientology's Acknowledgments:

I would also like to acknowledge the many Scientologists I have known over the past two dozen years. In no particular order, these include: David Aden, Sue Taylor, Gail Armstrong, Nancy O'Meara, Rick Moxon, Andrew Miln, Leisa Goodman, Janet Weiland, Sarah Burrough, Sheila McDonald, Glenn Barton, Jennifer Robinson, Kay and Lee Holzinger, Cindy and Steve Conway, Frank Molinaro, Sue Strzewski, Tony Klarich, Dave Klarich, Dan Costello, Nick Broadhurst, Yoko Takeda, Atushi Tojo Koji Minami, Chika Sakimoto, Heber Jentzsch and numerous other L.A. Scientologists whose names I have forgotten, and, finally, certain ex-Scientologists who prefer to remain nameless.

It appears that DM's mythical myth is in Tone 40 agreement with Rathbun's metaphorical metaphor.
 
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