My Brief Involvement With Scientology and the SO

virginia99

New Member
I was only with Scientology for about 6 months, so my story won't be as fantastic as many of them here, but I really want to talk about it.

In 1988 at the age of 23, I was to be married, but my fiance lived in another state. I had started nursing school and he just quit calling me, and I could not reach him. He had simply disappeared. I became extremely depressed and quit school. I learned later that this was my "ruin."

I had read Battlefield Earth and I thought, "Wouldn't it be fun to work in an organization like that-so bureaucratic and comical!" Later (1989), I picked up a Dianetics book and found what I believed to be the answer to my woes-a way to be mentally healthy. My brother and I took a trip to Seattle to take the introductory course at $200+, can't recall the name of the course. The staff gave us an extremely hard sell on the Purif rundown, which indeed sounded very helpful. My brother became very offended at (Name Withheld but I see he's gotten some honors) and hung up on him, never to look back. I, on the other hand, joined the staff, because I wanted services but couldn't afford them.

I had a fairly mundane time on staff in Seattle. The org was not very busy. I spent much of my time stuffing envelopes or handing out flyers. One late night, several SO members who were visiting ganged up on me and tried to convince me to join the SO. I was not the slightest bit interested. I'm not sure if they spent another evening on me, but they persisted with me, and I became very tired. Somebody read a brief passage written by LRH about sexual promiscuity being due to a lack of connection (or something similar) and a switch flipped in my brain, and I signed up, suddenly.

I headed to Los Angeles and started my EPF course at the scary blue building in Hollywood. I actually had fun with it. I experienced teamwork for the first time in my life and learned principles of productivity that were new to me. I enjoyed listening to the courses on old, worn out reel-to-reel tapes. I lost weight quickly, since I was active and had very little time to eat. I finished EPF in about 2 months. I remember crying for most of a day after speaking to my mother on the phone, she thought I had gone completely crazy. My dad actually came to see me from Montana. He had bought a very expensive plane ticket for me but I ended up not using it. He had also set up a meeting with Bent Corydon, author of Messiah or Madman (how I regret not meeting with him!).

I was assigned to train for my new job-Flag Representative to Seattle. My superior, Sophie, was pretty nice to me. I had some very interesting training courses, which I enjoyed . I had a lot of difficulty getting my stats up. I had to run "programs," some of which were quite simple, some were impossible. One week I had a very easy program in which I needed to only verify that certain items were available in the classrooms. My stats went high that week. The next week, the program had such tasks as: get the bookstore guy to hire 5 new people, sell 2,000 books, get x number of peole to sign up for auditing. Impossible, but I had to "make it go right," or my stats would suffer. I didn't dare face Ethics again (I had a scary event when I left my office door unlocked one time and 2 EOs were in there when I returned a few minutes later and I was downgraded to doubt, I think) and I really didn't want to go RPF, so I stole away one morning, called my mother for a bus ticket home (apologizing that I was quitting yet another endeavor, which she stated was quite alright), and just walked away the next day, no problem. I got a few phone calls but I would not consider returning, because I wasn't good enough to do the job assigned me.:no:

Another complication was that I was not getting paid, and I was not supposed to be getting room and board, since Seattle was supposed to pay my way. Seattle had no income, so I had no income. I would sneak downstairs and steal leftovers to eat, or rice and beans. Also, I wasn't even supposed to be in the room where I slept, but I must have slipped through the cracks.

I felt really guilty about leaving, and it took about a year before I stopped thinking their way. So many strange things happened in that short period of time that I haven't thought about in years, I may write some of them here later.

Well, thanks for listening. If anyone recognizes my name or location, please say hello!
 

ChaoticPsychotic

Patron with Honors
:runaway: Good for you for getting the hell outta there! It takes guts to blow so good for you!

Thanks for sharing your story with us. Every bit counts. :D
 

Div6

Crusader
Welcome and thanks for the post. Seattle, I woulkd think, what with all of that Microsoft money floating around, would be a huge target I would think....but I guess the Microsoft MindF*** is ultimately more rewarding than the Scn MindF***....
 

programmer_guy

True Ex-Scientologist
virginia99 said:
I was only with Scientology for about 6 months, ...

The shorter... the better.


virginia99 said:
I had read Battlefield Earth ...

I read that one too. It wasn't a block buster but I liked it anyway. Mission Earth was very boring... what little I read.


virginia99 said:
I had a fairly mundane time on staff in Seattle. The org was not very busy.

The Riverside Mission (E.D.: Bent Corydon) was very busy in the 1970s. I was there.


virginia99 said:
He had also set up a meeting with Bent Corydon, author of Messiah or Madman (how I regret not meeting with him!).

I like Bent. I posted pics of the building of the Riverside Mission on the thread here by that name. I'll bet (my guess) that Bent would still talk to you if you were ever in the area. I think that he still lives somewhere in Riverside County.


virginia99 said:
Another complication was that I was not getting paid, and I was not supposed to be getting room and board, since Seattle was supposed to pay my way. Seattle had no income, so I had no income. I would sneak downstairs and steal leftovers to eat, or rice and beans. Also, I wasn't even supposed to be in the room where I slept, but I must have slipped through the cracks.

Yeah... staff life was very meager and rough. Generally speaking, I've been there and done that too. :)


virginia99 said:
I felt really guilty about leaving, and it took about a year before I stopped thinking their way.

It's good that you got over it. In my case, I didn't feel guilty at all when I left. In fact, I went back to talk after I had left and went back to college... this wound up in an ethics office with several staff to talk to me.
 

Tom of Helatrobus

Patron Meritorious
I know what you mean when you write about feeling like a failure when you left... I felt the same way. Its because of the Scientology mindset; all wins are from Scientology, all failures are your fault. It took me some time (years) to realize that if the tech worked, I wouldn't have failed at all.

Tom
 
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Lee_from_phx

Patron with Honors
The first place I ever hear the "no case on post" business was at the Phoenix org.

The org was having trouble paying its bills (what a shocka!) The ED and the other execs were always saying crazy things like "We've decided that the stats will go up next week" as if simply wishing for it would somehow make it happen. (If that were true I'd be married to Christy Turlington.) Meanwhile they were continuing to do the very things that were causing the stats to be in the toilet week after week, namely following the policies of mad Hubbard.

Presuming for a moment that the cult actually has something to sell that is of worth, which of course it does not, but lets just pretend for a moment that it does.

Presuming this, how is it in the financial interest of the cult to deny itself customers? When everything they sell costs an arm and a leg, and they're doing absolutely NOTHING to bring in new customers aside from tossing "promo" in people's front yards, it isn't surprising that they don't do much business.

Of course when I tried to explain this to them, I got bitched at for it. They didn't want to hear it at all. To them econ 101 was "wog tech" and therefore automatically wrong, if not deliberately destructive. When I persisted in pointing out the self-evident truth of why things there were so bad, I got kicked off staff.

At the time I was very upset about that. Today I'm obviously very very glad that I was given my walking papers.

Today I find it amusing in a sad way how the cult has the staff people bullshitted into scamming the public out of its money for the creeps at the top, while believing all the while that they're just not trying hard enough, and that if they'd only get their ethics in and apply the policies correctly then everything would magically improve.

Luckily I don't think that the cult will be able to do this much longer. There will always be losers in the world, fools who are stupid enough to buy into the con and be victimized by it. But finding these losers and ensnaring them depends in large part upon the cult being an unknown quantity. The more notorious and infamous the cult becomes, the fewer people there are going to be who have no knowledge of it. Even a fool, if forewarned, is largely forearmed.

The cult will still manage to snare a few of course, but not nearly enough to maintain enough slaves to man the orgs, let alone keep the sea org afloat, especially since most of its victims do wake up sooner or later and leave. It will be very interesting to see what sort of shape the cult is in 5 years from now. How many orgs will close? How many nations will have NO scientology presence within it?

Every time one of us warns someone about the cult, we are hastening its demise. Telling the truth about the cult to all who will listen is the way to defeat it and cast it into the dust bin of history where it belongs.
 
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