New York Times #1 Nonfiction Best Seller Leah Remini's Scientology book Troublemaker

Boson Wog Stark

Patron Meritorious
Re: New York Times #1 Nonfiction Best Seller Leah Remini's Scientology book Troublema

THIS ARTICLE, entitled What Jennifer Lopez’s Scientology story can teach us about friendship, was quite good. I was surprised at how insightful it was, and obviously well informed the author was, and she even puts Jennifer's views in context with one of her previous statements.

The only new information for me was, "A representative said Jennifer Lopez has not been commenting on the book."

I think it'd be nice if J-Lo could say, "Yeah, I read it and it's great. I wish all the best to my friend, Leah." But I can see why she might think saying anything would just open a can of worms. By saying nothing, it's not going to hurt Leah's book, but J-Lo doesn't want to drag her father into the sights of Scientology.
 
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Intentionally Blank

Scientology Widow
Re: New York Times #1 Nonfiction Best Seller Leah Remini's Scientology book Troublema

When I think about it I would think that the large fonted blaring title "My Escape From Scientolgoy" would have some kind of impact when spotted by a scio member. The word "escape" is powerful and iconic. How many of us wanted to escape while we were stuck in the cult but hadn't yet figured out a way to do it. I know I escaped. I had to plan ahead for that day.

Hopefully that magazine cover hit the right nerve for Mr/s Blanky.

From your mouth to God's ears. Or - Mr/s Blanky's heart. I'll take either.
 

Enthetan

Master of Disaster
Re: New York Times #1 Nonfiction Best Seller Leah Remini's Scientology book Troublema

He's got no confront.

Which is why I think there's a good chance he will ultimately solo-audit on process R2-45.

At some level, he knows he cannot function in the real world, that non-Scientologists will not tolerate his rage attacks, and that the first non-SO he smacks will likely beat the living crap out of the little punk.
 

CommunicatorIC

@IndieScieNews on Twitter
Re: New York Times #1 Nonfiction Best Seller Leah Remini's Scientology book Troublema

http://www.nytimes.com/best-sellers-books/hardcover-nonfiction/list.html

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Boson Wog Stark

Patron Meritorious
Re: New York Times #1 Nonfiction Best Seller Leah Remini's Scientology book Troublema

I re-read Troublemaker and have some burning thoughts. Well, not burning, but they stuck out. First, it was enjoyable to read again, and Leah hits so many things right on the head. It's an amazing memoir.

At the time Leah was looking for a nanny for her new baby daughter, she mentions reasons for wanting her daughter raised as a normal kid, and not by all the Scientology rules with their language, so she'll fit in etc.

One thing she leaves out is if she hired a nanny that person would also be spying on her, and reporting back to the cult if she's doing anything out-tech in the raising of her child. This could very well have happened to Katie Holmes. At some point she realized she couldn't even deal with Suri when Jessica was around, in a manner where it wasn't reported to someone, and probably to Tom if he wasn't there.

Although I followed most of Leah's feelings about how she felt Tom Cruise was not an example of a good Scientologist because he was doing this or that, there was a disconnect there for me. The disconnect came when Leah thought she was vindicated by the divorce, for her behavior at the wedding and subsequent weeks of security checking at Flag. She thought for some odd reason, all the reports on her would be withdrawn and she would be given a credit, not a refund.

After the divorce from Katie, most Scientologists would have obviously thought that Tom was still a god, but that Katie was an SP. They wouldn't see his failed marriage as we do, or as she did at the time, a failure to use the tech to have a successful marriage. If Katie didn't wanted Suri to be raised in Scientology, that would make Katie even more of an SP in the minds of most true believers. They'd blame his failed marriage on anything but Tom himself. But Katie was the obvious trouble source to a Scientologist.

Granted, among the Sea Org, there may be a few who still don't feel Tom is dedicated in the way they are, working as many hours per week or sacrificing as much. However, the public Scientologists think he is the greatest.

Anyway, Katie and Tom splitting up didn't change what was perceived as Leah's misbehavior -- everything from being loud, to wanting her hotel room changed, seat changed, being late, asking about Shelly, chastising the Sea Org member for drinking wine and other things. Why should the divorce erase all that? Did Leah think that because she thought Scientology was falling apart, and looking bad at the time of the wedding, she was right and that would explain her behavior. And David Miscavige would step down, admitting he was wrong to do what he did to Shelly. Maybe she was under so much stress she had fantasies like that.

Leah admits to having blind spots, in comparison to how the how the world regards Scientology, and what they know about Hubbard and Miscavige, but she also had a blind spot about how Scientologists and Miscavige regard Tom Cruise.

As a Scientology celebrity who made it with the hit series, Leah felt like she had arrived, and with friends like J-Lo, she was at least associating with the Hollywood A-listers. Her struggle to make it as an actress was ever so much more difficult than Tom's also, and her early life equal to his, if not more impoverished. She saw his behavior up close though and saw he could be petty, egotistical, and immature, if not childish. And that's when he wasn't radiating that gung-ho enthusiasm about something, which after a while seemed cloying. He was kind of an empty shell. It would have been okay if there had been more compassion or substance behind his intensity and enthusiasm, but there wasn't -- just an inflated idea of his own importance.

Nevertheless, that shallow individual increased military recruitment substantially with his movie Top Gun, so vast swaths of the military like him. He has entertained, excited, inspired, and moved millions with his movies. Her influence has been minuscule in comparison. Women want him. Men want to be like him.

The money he's donated to Scientology would dwarf her expenditures, as would the number of people he's drawn into it simply by being Tom Cruise, and a Scientologist. Usually it's not people joining only because he's a member, of course, but that it is one reason they think it is attractive or acceptable/cool to be a member.

In comparison, not many people say, "I want to be a Scientologist because that nag on King of Queens is one." Travolta is the only one who comes close to Cruise in that regard, but even he's quite far behind.

Again, Leah explains most of her thinking well, and how she progressed from thinking this and that wasn't right, to thinking the whole thing is rotten.

I don't think Leah had an inflated idea of her comparative importance in Hollywood, just within Scientology and to Scientology. She even wrote about how invisible she was compared to J-Lo. And Leah also wrote about how Scientology led her to believe certain things.

I think Leah grew up using some complex formula for a person's value as a Scientologist, involving their integrity, devotion, how hard they worked, how much money they gave in comparison to how much they earned, their behavior towards everyone around them, and she just didn't understand that it was all about the money.

Leah has shown who she really is by writing this book -- a smart, funny woman with a lot of guts, who cares about people who suffer from being used and abused by Scientology, and also the ones still stuck in its trap.
 

Lone Star

Crusader
Re: New York Times #1 Nonfiction Best Seller Leah Remini's Scientology book Troublema

<snipped>

Although I followed most of Leah's feelings about how she felt Tom Cruise was not an example of a good Scientologist because he was doing this or that, there was a disconnect there for me. The disconnect came when Leah thought she was vindicated by the divorce, for her behavior at the wedding and subsequent weeks of security checking at Flag. She thought for some odd reason, all the reports on her would be withdrawn and she would be given a credit, not a refund.

After the divorce from Katie, most Scientologists would have obviously thought that Tom was still a god, but that Katie was an SP. They wouldn't see his failed marriage as we do, or as she did at the time, a failure to use the tech to have a successful marriage. If Katie didn't wanted Suri to be raised in Scientology, that would make Katie even more of an SP in the minds of most true believers. They'd blame his failed marriage on anything but Tom himself. But Katie was the obvious trouble source to a Scientologist.

Granted, among the Sea Org, there may be a few who still don't feel Tom is dedicated in the way they are, working as many hours per week or sacrificing as much. However, the public Scientologists think he is the greatest.

Anyway, Katie and Tom splitting up didn't change what was perceived as Leah's misbehavior -- everything from being loud, to wanting her hotel room changed, seat changed, being late, asking about Shelly, chastising the Sea Org member for drinking wine and other things. Why should the divorce erase all that? Did Leah think that because she thought Scientology was falling apart, and looking bad at the time of the wedding, she was right and that would explain her behavior. And David Miscavige would step down, admitting he was wrong to do what he did to Shelly. Maybe she was under so much stress she had fantasies like that.

<snipped>

Yes the whole TomKat wedding thing is bizarre to me. Makes very little sense. But we are talking about Scientology after all, so I shouldn't be surprised.

But her report that DM actually agreed to give Leah the full refund for her after wedding sec checks and such based on fact that Katie ended up being "an SP" is very surprising. Big time surprising. I do hope more and more of the still-ins hear about it. If I were still-in I'd be pissed that a celeb got a refund while there's no way in hell I or anyone else could.
 

Boson Wog Stark

Patron Meritorious
Re: New York Times #1 Nonfiction Best Seller Leah Remini's Scientology book Troublema

But her report that DM actually agreed to give Leah the full refund for her after wedding sec checks and such based on fact that Katie ended up being "an SP" is very surprising. Big time surprising.

I think they (including Miscavige) were surprised by Leah's persistence and intensity, and Miscavige thought that giving her the refund might calm her down. He could see that her concern over what constitutes a good Scientologist was perhaps sincere, and that she was outraged, how she was treated over all that stupid high schoolish stuff at the wedding. He saw giving her the refund as an alternative to pushing a loud and outspoken scilebrity out the door, where she might even write a book or something, talking about how Cruise has all the brains of a half-buttered bagel and likes to play hide-n-seek.

Miscavige weighed the cost/benefit, but then was powerless to do anything but make matters worse, by doing things like ordering his underlings to never question the whereabouts of Shelly, which he probably did with some kind of hand signal.

At that damn wedding, by asking about Shelly, Leah was like the little boy saying the Emperor has no clothes. It was something else no one else DARED do, and she did it so naturally, and then got louder and louder. After failing to control the noisy b, Miscavige hoped to nip that in the bud with the refund.

I think privately, Miscavige was probably crushed by the TomKat divorce. After all, they went through so much to select Katie, and she was couch-jumpingly perfect, so full of theta, writing her KRs and everything. She probably acted well enough to pretend every word out of the dwarf's mouth was enthralling. Katie was fine with urinating on Tom, or whatever kink he was into. Like I said, she was perfect. And then...
 

Terril park

Sponsor
Re: New York Times #1 Nonfiction Best Seller Leah Remini's Scientology book Troublema

Leah has shown who she really is by writing this book -- a smart, funny woman with a lot of guts, who cares about people who suffer from being used and abused by Scientology, and also the ones still stuck in its trap.

A heroine.

Mike Rinder refers to her as "Hurricane Leah".

She's still blowing. :)
 
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