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strativarius

Inveterate gnashnab & snoutband
Ha ha! :D I can't even understand most of that Dick Van Dyke accent!

Here's a news vid with some good deep southern US accents. I think Georgia is about as extreme as our southern accents get. Friar Tuck understanding them!

I couldn't bear to listen to the whole video - too painful. I thought Boomhauer was practically incomprehensible but these guys take the cake. In all fairness though Sheila, these people don't sound like the sharpest knives in the drawer.
 

F.Bullbait

Oh, a wise guy,eh?
Ha ha! :D I can't even understand most of that Dick Van Dyke accent!

Here's a news vid with some good deep southern US accents. I think Georgia is about as extreme as our southern accents get. Friar Tuck understanding them!

Waal, Ah hed no trubble givven them a lissen. Said.

Airplane ice reminds me of a story about my grandmother using a toilet on an airplane. She was very elderly and couldn't see well. She later told my grandfather that when she flushed the toilet, she saw the scenery passing underneath. After that, my grandfather always carried an umbrella when he went outside.
 

Leland

Crusader
giphy.gif
 

JustSheila

Crusader
I couldn't bear to listen to the whole video - too painful. I thought Boomhauer was practically incomprehensible but these guys take the cake. In all fairness though Sheila, these people don't sound like the sharpest knives in the drawer.
You might be surprised. I've met some sharp engineers from Georgia with Masters' degrees who speak that casually. They had no lack of intelligence, but they'd shift back and forth between dialects without even realizing it when I'd talk to them about more serious subjects, but this telecast is just about local weather.

I don't think a spoken dialect is an indication of education or social status anymore. It's more an indication of where a person lives or where they grew up than anything, like a cultural or environmental flag.
 
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strativarius

Inveterate gnashnab & snoutband
You might be surprised. I've met some sharp engineers from Georgia with Masters' degrees who speak that casually. They had no lack of intelligence, but they'd shift back and forth between dialects without even realizing it when I'd talk to them about more serious subjects, but this telecast is just about local weather.

I don't think a spoken dialect is an indication of education or social status anymore. It's more an indication of where a person lives or where they grew up than anything, like a cultural or environmental flag.
Of course, just because you have a regional accent doesn't mean you are less intelligent than someone who employs 'received pronunciation'. I like some of the regional accents we have in Great Britain, especially a Geordie accent. Irish, Welsh and Scottish accents are easy on the ear as well IMO, whereas a scouse accent is just plain horrible.
 

JustSheila

Crusader
Of course, just because you have a regional accent doesn't mean you are less intelligent than someone who employs 'received pronunciation'. I like some of the regional accents we have in Great Britain, especially a Geordie accent. Irish, Welsh and Scottish accents are easy on the ear as well IMO, whereas a scouse accent is just plain horrible.
Yeh, I like all those accents too. Easy listenin! :) What's your regional accent?
 

phenomanon

Canyon
Mary Poppins! Dick Van Dyke! <3 <3 <3

Wow, funny to see this as an adult. I never thought of Dick Van Dyke as the singing and dancing park bum in Mary Poppins before! :D

I've been trying to teach one of my cockatiels to whistle, "It's a Jolly Holiday with Mary." She does some parts, but likes her own creative medley of Jolly Holiday mashed together with Pop Goes the Weasel, the first few notes of Beethoven's Fifth, the Gomer Pyle and My Three Sons theme songs and The Colonel Bogey March.

I'm not sure if she has a short attention span or just likes certain bars of those songs and not the others! :D






(Thanks for the compliment, Strati! :D IDK if my dramatization of a cockney accent is very accurate, but it's how it sounds to me. I imagine you can do a deep southern US accent far better than I could, too!)
:eek::eek::eek::eek:
 

phenomanon

Canyon
Ha ha! :D I can't even understand most of that Dick Van Dyke accent!

Here's a news vid with some good deep southern US accents. I think Georgia is about as extreme as our southern accents get. Friar Tuck understanding them!

Wouldn't try to understand the bitch. She's crazy.
 

strativarius

Inveterate gnashnab & snoutband
Yeh, I like all those accents too. Easy listenin! :) What's your regional accent?
I haven't got an accent, I was born and brought up in London and there isn't really a London accent. I suppose the closest would be 'Estuary English'.

This guy will explain exactly what Estuary English is. He's not bad - for a petrol, (petrol tank = yank - geddit?) but you only need to listen to the first couple of minutes.
 
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phenomanon

Canyon
Of course, just because you have a regional accent doesn't mean you are less intelligent than someone who employs 'received pronunciation'. I like some of the regional accents we have in Great Britain, especially a Geordie accent. Irish, Welsh and Scottish accents are easy on the ear as well IMO, whereas a scouse accent is just plain horrible.
There is a blonde newscaster on BBC that is an example of how Brit women talk through their nose. The sound of it really annoys me.
 

RogerB

Crusader
I haven't got an accent, I was born and brought up in London and there isn't really a London accent. I suppose the closest would be 'Estuary English'.
Well, Strattie . . . let's be a little more exact here:D

Being brought up in London would likely give you what is referred to as the "Home Counties" accent. But, to be honest London does confer a number of accents on its residents . . . umm, think Cockney if you're from the "East End" or the accent they have from Greenwich, through the docklands, on down to Kent.

One of the fun things I would do for a giggle would be to go over to the border between the City of London and the East End where they run the regular street vendors . . . for you non-English, please realize "London" is a monstrous city in dimension and it has a distinct smaller City within it . . . and chide them on their Aussie accents!!
\
All this, by the way, was exposed on a wonderful, definitive series done by the BBC titled "The Story of English."

/
 

strativarius

Inveterate gnashnab & snoutband
There is a blonde newscaster on BBC that is an example of how Brit women talk through their nose. The sound of it really annoys me.
Jeez, there are loads of 'em:

Emily Weightless
Martine Croxall
Sophie Raworth
Joanna Gosling
Kate Silverton...
 

Leland

Crusader
Yes, I was in London around 1964 and asked someone on the street for directions....

I couldn't understand a single word he said....and assumed it was a Cockney Accent...?

:D
 
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strativarius

Inveterate gnashnab & snoutband
Well, Strattie . . . let's be a little more exact here:D

Being brought up in London would likely give you what is referred to as the "Home Counties" accent. But, to be honest London does confer a number of accents on its residents . . . umm, think Cockney if you're from the "East End" or the accent they have from Greenwich, through the docklands, on down to Kent.

One of the fun things I would do for a giggle would be to go over to the border between the City of London and the East End where they run the regular street vendors . . . for you non-English, please realize "London" is a monstrous city in dimension and it has a distinct smaller City within it . . . and chide them on their Aussie accents!!
\
All this, by the way, was exposed on a wonderful, definitive series done by the BBC titled "The Story of English."

/
Ok, but the 'Home Counties' accent is essentially no accent at all. Look at it this way. A 'London accent' is plain vanilla, and all the other regions have different added flavours. Sorry, but it's the best I can do.
 

strativarius

Inveterate gnashnab & snoutband
Yes, I was in London around 1964 and asked someone on the street for directions....

[bcolor=#ffff00]I've couldn't understand a single word he said[/bcolor]....and assumed it was a Cockney Accent...?

:D
Perhaps he was Hungarian Lee. :biggrin:
 

Bill

Gold Meritorious Patron
I haven't got an accent, I was born and brought up in London and there isn't really a London accent. I suppose the closest would be 'Estuary English'.

This guy will explain exactly what Estuary English is. He's not bad - for a petrol, (petrol tank = yank - geddit?) but you only need to listen to the first couple of minutes.
Once, when hitch-hiking in England, I was picked up by a family with the most amazing accents. They were black and had emigrated from America from the deep-deep south but had lived for quite a while in East End London. The combined accent of American-black-deep south-cockney was absolutely wonderful. Mind you, I only understood about half of what they said.
 

strativarius

Inveterate gnashnab & snoutband
no, for sure he was British...:scratch:

Edited: bastard..caught my spelling error...
Just kiddin'.

Edit. Are you calling me a bastard Leland? Although I spotted your typo straight away I made no reference to it
 
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strativarius

Inveterate gnashnab & snoutband
Once, when hitch-hiking in England, I was picked up by a family with the most amazing accents. They were black and had emigrated from America from the deep-deep south but had lived for quite a while in East End London. The combined accent of American-black-deep south-cockney was absolutely wonderful. Mind you, I only understood about half of what they said.
You often hear Americans say that they have had difficulty understanding what some Brits are saying. Whether they come from Alaska or Texas I have no problem understanding what Americans say.
 
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