Question for long-timers after leaving SO

Dave

Patron
To all of you who have spent a considerable amount of years of your lives in the SO or any Orgs. When you finally made the right decision to leave, how did you find a suitable employment if all you had was Scientology work history? Did employers accept your past 20-30 years of experience as a scientology staff member? What kind of job did you manage to get? I'm just curious. While I was going to the org, many times they tried to recruit me and, apart from all the downsides of being on staff, the deterrent for me was that I could perhaps never get a decent job in the normal world. What did you do? Did you have any good transferable skills? Did employers accept it? What jobs did you end up in?

I ended up the oldest Dominos Pizza delivery boy
 

Petey C

Silver Meritorious Patron
To all of you who have spent a considerable amount of years of your lives in the SO or any Orgs. When you finally made the right decision to leave, how did you find a suitable employment if all you had was Scientology work history? Did employers accept your past 20-30 years of experience as a scientology staff member? What kind of job did you manage to get? I'm just curious. While I was going to the org, many times they tried to recruit me and, apart from all the downsides of being on staff, the deterrent for me was that I could perhaps never get a decent job in the normal world. What did you do? Did you have any good transferable skills? Did employers accept it? What jobs did you end up in?
Great question.

I was in for 8 years, maybe not that long but long enough. When I got out, I was 32. I stayed weeping at my mother's for a few weeks then got over myself and went to the nearest big city (Sydney, Australia) and immediately got a job in the recruitment business, through a friend. They paid me almost nothing -- lunch money and fares, basically, but I landed a big commission in week 4 so I got put on the payroll. I still earned a pittance but hey -- it was money, I had a bank account, and I went home every day at 5pm and had weekends off. How hard could life be?

I hid Scn in my CV as I didn't want questions. I think I was a bit emotionally wobbly still, even though I put on a brave face. But I did decide I wouldn't (a) use any Scn/SO jargon ever, (b) stare at people with full TR0 unless they really pissed me off, (c) blame myself if I couldn't get work immediately (it was a recession), and (d) certainly not proseletize. I wanted to immerse myself in the world and not be half in, half out. At the time I thought DM was bad, LRH was good. I came to the conclusion some time later that it's all, they are all, crazy, period.

I worked in the up and coming IT field for a while and did pretty well. My view was that the worst had already happened to me so I had nothing else to fear. I had good admin and management skills and could bullshit with the best of them, but also I think I was honest and straightforward with my employers. (Except when I told them I worked for a self-help publishing organisation in the USA!!) Finally after a few years of this I was a sales manager for a small computer co. that went bust and so I got the shaft, but then so did everyone else. I decided to go back to university and I did that, staying with my mother again and working during my vacations to earn money. That was what eventually changed my life. Someone turned on the light and opened a window and I was well and truly saved. Somehow, I had to acquire a new system, a new way of viewing things, a new way of engaging, and for me, returning to university and doing some tough, interesting, completely non-Scn subjects (like Japanese, like linguistics) did it for me.I then got a job at the same university and about 12 years later was, hey lookee here, senior management. I don't have a clear idea of how THAT happened except that I was always a squeaky wheel and the big bosses would get exasperated and say, OK, if you're complaining so much, YOU fix it.

Friends, lovers and families helped a lot, not so much with jobs and such but by remembering things for me and reminding me who I really was. Even while I was still in Oz but in Scn, I had no clue what was going on in the world, and when I got out, they interpreted things for me that I had totally missed. I wondered at times where I really went.

It is amazing now, so many years later, to think about that part of my life. I come across as absolutely "normal" now! (But I can still turn on a wicked TR0 when I need to.) The main thing is that as the SO time gets further and further away, it became an increasingly smaller part of my life. It will never be away from me, but I no longer dream about Scn, the SO, Flag, Int, PAC, the RPF, etc -- most of it has now been picked up, inspected, re-interpreted and revalued, and set aside.

I live in Australia and will help anyone in Oz who needs help readjusting to life after the SO or Scn. Just send me a message.

P.C.
 

thefiredragon

Patron Meritorious
After I left S O I had a baby and then some more.
I was stay at home mom for many years.
Now I'm thinking about a getting a job. Any job(!) because my second husband blew.
But i don't really have anything to put on my resume,so I'm just gambling like crazy in effort to make some money.
A friend of mine told me she can help me to make a fake resume and give her
phone number as a reference. I probably will have to do that. LOL
 

La La Lou Lou

Crusader
You don't have to lie.
Say what you did so they can understand, you did child care if you were a nanny, you did general administrative tasks if you were in CF, you gave advice to prospective students if you were on the test line. You don't have to say Scientology if that freeks you out, you can say AOSH, they wont know what that is, they will just nod sagely at you. You worked for CMO ANZO, it means nothing they probably never will ask what it stands for, you can always say the company went bankrupt in the recession, IASA tour West US, 'oh that sounds nice, I like travel too.'

The other thing is to realise that you did make some products, you did work, if you cleaned, you made sure that a level of hygiene was maintained.

This is very hard when youv'e just come out of that place. But you have to understand that potential employers are looking for qualities you have. Not your ability to shout at people because they didn't do it per the HCOPL, but other qualities, some of which youve forgotten or were told not to use. Like an ability to really listen to people, to get them to find solutions themselves. It is togh but you have have to find things about yourself that are good, and disregard all the inval and eval.
 

FinallyMe

Silver Meritorious Patron
This thread is applicable even two years after the first post!

I just put "American St. Hill Organization" on my resume, and answered "what is that" by saying it is a philosophic training center and the interviewer let it go at that - perhaps nervous about asking forbidden questions. Having been a letter reg, I told them my duties were "typing" and "customer communication" - which fit in with me seeking secretarial jobs (never having done that before). I got the jobs and, perhaps 10 years later, I quit putting ASHO on my resume. Then I moved into the legal field and no longer had to list secretarial positions!
 

thefiredragon

Patron Meritorious
You don't have to lie.
Say what you did so they can understand, you did child care if you were a nanny, you did general administrative tasks if you were in CF, you gave advice to prospective students if you were on the test line. You don't have to say Scientology if that freeks you out, you can say AOSH, they wont know what that is, they will just nod sagely at you. You worked for CMO ANZO, it means nothing they probably never will ask what it stands for, you can always say the company went bankrupt in the recession, IASA tour West US, 'oh that sounds nice, I like travel too.'

.

Thanks!:thumbsup:
 

Ladybird

Silver Meritorious Patron
When I 1st left, I got jobs doing things I knew about, Call-In
translated to selling professional magazines on the phone, things like
"Agricultural Parts Trader", ""Airplane Exchange", Construction
Industry Magazine, etc. Telemarketers are always hiring, and it is not
a great job, but beats the hell out of selling a scam and there is no
Thursday at 2 to worry about! I also got my real estate license, takes
about 6 weeks and often the training is free through one of the large
brokers, and anything in sales kind of relates to regging.

Then I decided to go back to college, and found there are many programs
to help adults go back to college, whether for a degree or certificate.


I STRONGLY recommend staying away from "Trade Schools", on-line
certificate programs, etc. Most are scams, and there was a recent "60
Minutes" show on CBS about this. I also read recently that some of the
largest, ( CEC, Smartcertify, etc.) are associated with WISE, and Jerry
DYAS (OT 8 from Clearwater) is one of the owners. Their certs are
essentially worthless in getting a job, all you end up with is a huge
student loan debt.


That said, the way to go is to enroll in your local community
college and apply for financial aide. After working for $scn for years,
you definitely qualify! I got Pell grants, State grants, and took out
student loans. While attending school full time, I got a part-time job
as a bartender/waiter in a nice supper club. I usually made 200 to 300
dollars a night working only Friday and Saturday. I doubled up on
classes and did summer school and winter breaks for extra credit, and
graduated in just less than 2 years. I saved money by living in a
really cheap mobile home, hell I was never there anyway, and it was
MUCH nicer than staff berthing!!!

I started applying for jobs 6 months before graduation, and landed a really good one
that I started right away while still a student. I continued part time in University
even after graduating Community College to get promoted at work.

Also, I used my knowledge of real estate to buy a crappy house in
a decent neighborhood using a government backed FHA loan. I lived there
for 2 years, fixed it up, and made enough to buy a better house, and
did the same thing. So in just a few years after leaving $cn, I was
making 70K a year salary, sold 2 houses and bought a third, paid off my
student loans and had enough money to pay off my "freeloader debt".

THANK GOD for the Internet!!!!! And A big Thanks to all the
critics who put the truth about $cn out there! I did not give one thin
dime to $cn, and never will, even though now I could buy the whole
"bridge" if I wanted to. (What bridge? There is no bridge!)

The only thing I have to thank the Sea Org for is teaching me to work like a dog
and live on almost nothing. Oh, and thank you very much for declaring
me an SP!
 

Ladybird

Silver Meritorious Patron
Another suggestion to ex-Sea Org:

Coming out of the SO after years can be really scary. I remember
one of my juniors who had been in for decades, he was in tears because
his wife got pregnant and they were being sent to a Class V org. He was
a tough guy, had been a CO and held many exec positions since the days
when LRH was still around. But he was absolutely terrified of having to
go out in the wog world and pay rent and buy his own food, etc., as he
had been in the SO since he was a teen and had never had a "real" job.
I felt the same way after years of indoctrination. They came back to
the Sea Org years later, not looking happy or healthy at all.

When I finally left, I read about health care being one of the
fastest growing job markets due to the baby boom generation getting to
retirement age. There are a lot of great opportunities in geriatrics.

If I were coming out of the SO now, with my 500 dollars severance pay
and no work history, I would go to work at a Nursing Home. They are
ALWAYS hiring. They have on the job training so you can get a CNA.
(Certified Nurse Assistant Certificate.)

Once you have that, you can go
to work at a hospital, they hire CNAs all the time. Check if a hospital
in your area has a tuition reimbursement program. You can start as a
CNA or a monitor technician or a unit clerk. Often training is
provided. Check with the Human Resources Dept., they usually have a job
board with the requirements listed.

Once you are hired and have a few
months of good production, apply for training as an RN. Several
hospitals in my area have programs where you work 20 hours but get full
time pay and benefits to attend Nursing School. (There is a nationwide
shortage of Nurses.) You just have sign a contract promising to work
for them for a few years after you graduate. (usually 2 years). RNs
average over 25/hr, much more if you specialize. (ER, ICU, Surgery,
Life Flight, etc.)

The real world is so much more sane than the SO,
especially if you were an exec. There are rules and laws and justice
that are actually applied. You get paid for your work, and you have
security and benefits. Plus, you can really help people, and isn't
that why we joined the Sea Org in the 1st Place?
 

Lurker5

Gold Meritorious Patron
These are great replies

My experiences - with scn'ists, the in-nies and the exes, and with jobs in the real world, tell me that most ex-scn'ists have what it takes to do any job I can do, or that they want to do, even if it requires some kind of further education.

We all start at the bottom, and make our way in the world. Most of us just do it sooner in the real world than those leaving scn after years in. But those in for all those years have been doing jobs - and had to do them well - right? And scn'ists had to learn new stuff - and had to do a good job, even with new stuff, no matter what, right?

Just apply that kind of intent and focus - and employers are going to LIKE YOU.

I wasn't in scn, but had a short brush with it - about midway through my search for self and what I should be doing with my life to - ahem :eyeroll: - earn a living. But before that, I was just trying to find a JOB and support myself. I didn't have a higher education, but I had basic skills. I started at the bottom, worked different jobs/areas, worked hard, applied myself - even when I knew I wasn't going to stay long, just needed money. I always gave my best and did a good job. That is how I was raised, what my parents taught me was the way to being a good human being. I had/have, what I consider to be - REAL ethics :dieslaughing:

When I finally did figure out what I was particularly good at, I then spent a number of years working my way into responsibility and better wages.

That is actually a rare thing out here - LOL - and employers love finding employees who work like that. I have seen that in ex-scn'ists - like they were 'raised' with that too :D It is VALUABLE !

In fact, I think you will come to realize that you have a lot more going for you than those who were not in scn, lol - even without an education. I am not kidding. It shines through - I see it all over this board . . . Most people out here don't get that kind of a 'raising' anymore. That is old fashoined, obsolete - :whistling: It really is a rare and valuable commodity. If you were a good scn'ist, you will be a good employee, and/or business person, Trust me on that. You may need some new skills on dealing with people IN a work place :coolwink:

There are just as many sociopathic power-grubbing businesses, execs, employers, and fellow employees out here as in there, and just as many out here willing to stand on your head to save themselves. Oh yeah. Game players.

Trust me on that too.

You handled yourself in, you can handle yourself out - it just might take a while to adjust to a different 'climate' if it really is a different climate . . .

People are people, in or out. You have some extraordinary skills already that you do not have to dump - just maybe that 'survival mode' attitude you all were in, when you were "in" - if you find a good place/job to work.

If you find a good place to work, a good job, or end up working for self, you can actually have a wonderful good life/job. :yes:
 
G

Gottabrain

Guest
When I left the SO, I had no money, barely any clothes, a young child to take care of and my mother had already disconnected from me because she didn't want me to influence my brothers and sisters. My brothers, sisters and old non-Scn friends had mixed reactions, but none were a position to help me then.

I knocked on the door of the mgr of a decrepit apt blg the SO had previously rented from and basically begged him to take me in on his doorstep. He did. I slept on a couch and my child was on a mattress in the living room.

I found and contacted public Scientologists whom I had known to think for themselves and I'd previously befriended and was helped by the Israeli group.

I applied for a job in bookkeeping since I had spent a number of years doing it in the SO and a current SO member provided the reference. My boss taught me to speak regular English when I slipped into Sci-speak. Two years later, when I thanked him, he told me he had never known I was a Scientologist and was just correcting me because sometimes I used strange words or normal words in a strange way.
 

GoNuclear

Gold Meritorious Patron
You all did better than me

I was never staff, just public. But attempting to deal with both Scientology and the Navy was simply too much. In order to stay "on lines" with the local Scientology mission, I made a career move that I never ever ever should have made, opting for a situation that kept me in port as opposed to out at sea. It was absolute pure unadulterated misery, the exact wrong command for me to be at. The result was a disaster for me. Shortly after that debacle, things got totally crazy with the 5% per month price increase insanity. This was the peak of it, in mid 1980. Of course, rather than admit that they were pricing themselves out of business, the mission went on a witch hunt for espees. It was like the Stalinist purges of the "old comrades" back in the 1930's. Eventually, it was my turn to be branded "downstat" and assigned a condition, which I ignored, and simply stayed away until they lifted the condition, after which my heart simply wasn't into it anymore, period. But, between the Navy and Scientology, I never fully recovered. I had a job out at a nuclear power plant in California for awhile, back in late 81 and early 82. It was in January of 82 that I got the word that the mission I was at in Connecticut had broken away from Cof$ and that old timer
old OTVII/class 8 with a few zillion hours auditing, a guy who really, really, really knew Scientology ... F. Brown Mckee ... was declared. He was the mission holder and he splintered off from Cof$. At that point I was more or less out of Scientology.

Anyways, to be honest, I never really did recover, and that was 28 years ago. I wound up out on the street, wound up pan handling professionally. I also managed to get married, father a son (in college now), start and loose a few businesses, get a house, loose a house, wind up back on the street living in my car, and finally working out of the house. I truthfully can't hold a regular job, I am "damaged goods". The last time I tried a regular job was 12 years ago. I made the mistake of pouring my heart into it, and the result was a lot of heart ache. I am always amazed at how so many people have bounced back so much better than I have.

Pete
 

La La Lou Lou

Crusader
Pete, perhaps all you can see at the moment is the bad times but you have done amazing things even if all you see is the bad. Try doing a list of things you actually have achieved. Disregard the bad, just write up achievements, you might feel better. There is perhaps some training you can do that will ensure that you don't go into the pattern of falling on your face, or counselling really can help. Sounds to me that your an achiever at heart.
 
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