Robin Scott's book on Scn

Wilbur

Patron Meritorious
Wow, it's fascinating looking at his website. He had such a good start to life, coming from a good school and graduating from Oxford. He still seems to be obsessed with Scientology, though. Reading between the lines, it seems like Scientology commandeered his life and thinking after he graduated Oxford, and he never got it back. I'd also be curious to know whether his book is worth reading, if anyone has read it.

At least we have him to thank for liberating the NOTS pack, and putting us all out of mystery as to what NOTS consisted of. I wonder whether he still believes in NOTS.
 

Wilbur

Patron Meritorious
According to his website, he went to prison in the 1990s for growing cannabis (as well as his stint in prison in (presumably) the 1980s for stealing the NOTS pack from AOSH EU).
 

Veda

Sponsor
Wow, it's fascinating looking at his website. He had such a good start to life, coming from a good school and graduating from Oxford. He still seems to be obsessed with Scientology, though. Reading between the lines, it seems like Scientology commandeered his life and thinking after he graduated Oxford, and he never got it back. I'd also be curious to know whether his book is worth reading, if anyone has read it.

At least we have him to thank for liberating the NOTS pack, and putting us all out of mystery as to what NOTS consisted of. I wonder whether he still believes in NOTS.
During a particularly dangerous time Robin Scott didn't shrink from taking them on, so we know he's no milquetoast.
In the link, there's a desire to convey that this book, unlike other books written by former members who, apparently, were mere plebeians, lacking pedigree and a proper education, is:

"The first academically-qualified first-hand intellectual analysis of the applied religious philosophy... Robin Scott was born in London in 1948 to a distinguished intellectual family... graduated from Oxford...

Even while in Scientology he rose above the riff raff:

"In 1973 he joined the Church of Scientology's elite Sea Organization..."

Scientology's dubious status as a religion and its quickie (PR) Minister's Course is taken quite seriously:

"He was ordained as a Minister of Religion in 1976..."

That said, the above quoted content seems to be from a book blurb, and such material is sometimes written by the publisher.

In any event, his interests are certainly eclectic:

"He has practiced Yoga for thirty years and was described by GQ magazine as 'the Cannabis Guru'...

And he's definitely tasted the wrath of Scientology's Fair Game philosophy and mentality - which he must recognize originated from L. Ron Hubbard and, I hope, also recognizes was never actually discontinued by him:

"In 1983, Robin Scott and his wife Adrienne resigned and became leading critics of the Church of Scientology's abuses, setting up their own independent center in Scotland, resulting in many years of litigation, harassment and intimidation from the Church..."

And finally:

"This book contains the full story of their relationship with the Church, and his descriptions and conclusions about the workability of Scientology, which he still believes contains many valuable and important techniques."


______________


Here's a critique, by Robin Scott, of Marty Rathbun from 2011 when Marty was the "Martin Luther of Independent Scientology."
Reading it gave me additional cause for optimism that this book may be a worthwhile contribution, and provide an interesting perspective on the subject:

Robin Scott on Marty Rathbun | Why We Protest | Anonymous Activism Forum




 

Veda

Sponsor
4957713.jpg



Can't even find his Cannibis friendly book listed on Amazon.

Is no one curious?
 

EZ Linus

Cleared Tomato
I just found this thread and found the description of this book interesting. I'll admit I'm bias, having written a book of my own and having no official pedigree, especially one from Oxford, but how does that make ones opinion about the cult more objective and qualified than one written by a "mere plebeian" former member who lack education? Do you mean to tell me one must have gone to an ivy league school previous to getting involved with Scientology to be qualified to give intellectual analysis of the applied "religious philosophy?" What about those that went on to be properly educated after they left? In any case, I'd like to see how much research he did in the writing of this book, so I'll check it out. My book is a mere memoir, not an academic book by any means, but I still cite a list of texts six pages long after a glossary.
 

Dulloldfart

Squirrel Extraordinaire
I see he's got this other book coming out as well later this year.
https://www.lifetech.org.uk/product/the-case-for-cannabis/

View attachment 15476
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabis_in_the_United_Kingdom

Cannabis in the United Kingdom is illegal for recreational use and is classified as a Class B drug. In 2004, cannabis was made a Class C drug with less severe penalties but it was moved back to Class B in 2009. Medical use of cannabis when prescribed by a registered specialist doctor was legalised in November 2018.
<snip>

I looked that up because I didn't know what the law was in the UK these days. I often smell "skunk" around the streets, which I notice because its smell is so distinctive (in LA we literally had a skunk family that lived fairly unobtrusively in the front yard). I don't know how carefully the law is applied, and am not interested in researching it further (I haven't indulged since 1972).

He seems to be painting a target on his back with that book blurb.

Paul
 

Type4_PTS

Diamond Invictus SP
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabis_in_the_United_Kingdom

Cannabis in the United Kingdom is illegal for recreational use and is classified as a Class B drug. In 2004, cannabis was made a Class C drug with less severe penalties but it was moved back to Class B in 2009. Medical use of cannabis when prescribed by a registered specialist doctor was legalised in November 2018.
<snip>

I looked that up because I didn't know what the law was in the UK these days. I often smell "skunk" around the streets, which I notice because its smell is so distinctive (in LA we literally had a skunk family that lived fairly unobtrusively in the front yard). I don't know how carefully the law is applied, and am not interested in researching it further (I haven't indulged since 1972).

He seems to be painting a target on his back with that book blurb.

Paul
Here in the U.S. under the federal laws Marijuana is illegal for any purpose, and under a classification (Schedule 1) which doesn't acknowledge any medical benefits.

That's completely insane as there is very strong scientific evidence that it has significant benefits for many medical issues.

That's just one of many indicators of the relationship between the feds and Big Pharma.
Generally they (the feds) just bend over and grab their ankles.

Fortunately, the individual states are moving pretty quickly to legalize medical marijuana, and about 20% of the states have legalized recreational marijuana.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_cannabis_by_U.S._jurisdiction

potlaws.PNG
 

Veda

Sponsor
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabis_in_the_United_Kingdom

Cannabis in the United Kingdom is illegal for recreational use and is classified as a Class B drug. In 2004, cannabis was made a Class C drug with less severe penalties but it was moved back to Class B in 2009. Medical use of cannabis when prescribed by a registered specialist doctor was legalised in November 2018.
<snip>

I looked that up because I didn't know what the law was in the UK these days. I often smell "skunk" around the streets, which I notice because its smell is so distinctive (in LA we literally had a skunk family that lived fairly unobtrusively in the front yard). I don't know how carefully the law is applied, and am not interested in researching it further (I haven't indulged since 1972).

He seems to be painting a target on his back with that book blurb.

Paul
In the USA being an advocate for Cannabis would increase his popularity.


It seems like a potentially persuasive combination of traits: Oxford man, critical yet selectively affirmative attitude towards Scientology, and Cannabis proponent.

If only they'd publish the damned book.
 

Type4_PTS

Diamond Invictus SP
I just found this thread and found the description of this book interesting. I'll admit I'm bias, having written a book of my own and having no official pedigree, especially one from Oxford, but how does that make ones opinion about the cult more objective and qualified than one written by a "mere plebeian" former member who lack education? Do you mean to tell me one must have gone to an ivy league school previous to getting involved with Scientology to be qualified to give intellectual analysis of the applied "religious philosophy?" What about those that went on to be properly educated after they left? In any case, I'd like to see how much research he did in the writing of this book, so I'll check it out. My book is a mere memoir, not an academic book by any means, but I still cite a list of texts six pages long after a glossary.
IMO, many of us who were heavily involved for years or decades in Scientology are qualified to write about it.

There's been a number of members on ESMB where I'd love to buy their book should they write one and I have no idea as to what (if any) formal education they had, nor do I care.

@Gadfly is one of them.

:waiting:
 
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