Scn Nanny Software

Dulloldfart

Squirrel Extraordinaire
I put this in its own thread because the one it was in is quite wacky and I don't want to be associated with it, being so sensible and all that. :)

You might have a computer connected to the net, but you are forced to use software that censors a letany of sites they don't want you to see.

Is this still true?

Sometime between 1997-1999 I remember working for a Scn (WISE) company in LA and the CofS was putting together the cookie-cutter Scientologist web sites. As were all the Scios in the company, I was given a form to fill out if I wanted, re getting one of these cookie-cutter pages.

One of the points was that if one were to fill out the data for such a site online (as opposed to filling it out hard copy and some staff member would do the data input) one would have to install software to "restrict access to entheta sites" or some similar wording. It said that quite plainly--it wasn't hidden or covert at all. I said no thanks as I didn't want such software, thank you very much. There was no comeback from that, that I was aware of anyway.

I always assumed that people who did unwittingly install the nanny software just didn't read the info sheet, or if they read it didn't understand it.

Years ago I read that if you reinstall the browser or a later version of it, it nullifies the nanny functions anyway.

I know that critics sometimes bring up this subject as if it were current, but I haven't heard of the CofS repeating this nanny software trip since last century. Have they?

Paul
 

Zinjifar

Silver Meritorious Sponsor
I put this in its own thread because the one it was in is quite wacky and I don't want to be associated with it, being so sensible and all that. :)



Is this still true?

Sometime between 1997-1999 I remember working for a Scn (WISE) company in LA and the CofS was putting together the cookie-cutter Scientologist web sites. As were all the Scios in the company, I was given a form to fill out if I wanted, re getting one of these cookie-cutter pages.

One of the points was that if one were to fill out the data for such a site online (as opposed to filling it out hard copy and some staff member would do the data input) one would have to install software to "restrict access to entheta sites" or some similar wording. It said that quite plainly--it wasn't hidden or covert at all. I said no thanks as I didn't want such software, thank you very much. There was no comeback from that, that I was aware of anyway.

I always assumed that people who did unwittingly install the nanny software just didn't read the info sheet, or if they read it didn't understand it.

Years ago I read that if you reinstall the browser or a later version of it, it nullifies the nanny functions anyway.

I know that critics sometimes bring up this subject as if it were current, but I haven't heard of the CofS repeating this nanny software trip since last century. Have they?

Paul

It was only for Windows '95 and replaced a file necessary for the TCP protocol, so, reinstalling the browser wouldn't fix it. However, you could replace a dll file to get rid of it. As far as I know, they never got around to making a Windows 98 or later version.

Zinj
 

Dulloldfart

Squirrel Extraordinaire
It was only for Windows '95 and replaced a file necessary for the TCP protocol, so, reinstalling the browser wouldn't fix it. However, you could replace a dll file to get rid of it. As far as I know, they never got around to making a Windows 98 or later version.

Zinj

Thanks for the correct data, Zinji. :)

Paul
 

hartley

Patron with Honors
It was only for Windows '95 and replaced a file necessary for the TCP protocol, so, reinstalling the browser wouldn't fix it. However, you could replace a dll file to get rid of it. As far as I know, they never got around to making a Windows 98 or later version.
That's correct.

The 'Scienositter' was a custom version of a commercial program that replaced the list of websites unsuitable for children and lists of naughty keywords with entheta ones. I'm pleased to say I was on it in three places!

Dulloldfart is also correct there was a form to fill in, though it was less clearly worded than that.

The project was abandoned along with the cookie cutter webpage project in early 2003. At its peak there were about 16,000 pages, pretty good considering the real size of the cult. It has been to some extent replaced with blogs on the Blogger system.
 

Free to shine

Shiny & Free
The project was abandoned along with the cookie cutter webpage project in early 2003. At its peak there were about 16,000 pages, pretty good considering the real size of the cult. It has been to some extent replaced with blogs on the Blogger system.

Hartley do you know how I can get my page removed? I have requested it to a general email addy but no response.
 
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