The Daily Beast: Hubbard and the Explorers Club

Anonycat

Crusader
Exclusive New Texts from L. Ron Hubbard

Here’s the story you know, if you know one at all, about L. Ron Hubbard. He was the messiah-scribe of Scientology, “the source” who revealed the religion, founded the church, and led it for more than three decades. Some of his followers today are extremely famous, and others are alleged to be extremely vindictive, violent, and cruel, especially to defectors. Less known is simply this: the greatest affiliation of Hubbard’s life—his first, last, and longest professional connection—wasn’t Scientology or even Dianetics, the system of self-exploration that laid the cornerstone for his empire.



It was the Explorers Club of New York City, the preeminent society of adventurer-scholars, where a glamorous midcentury photo of him (pictured) welcomes anyone who reaches for his file. “Home camp,” as the club’s literature put it in Hubbard’s time, “for the far-wandering exploring coterie, wheresoever their trails may have taken them.” Founded in the spring of 1904 by “men of daring and achievement,” its members went on to notch every major first of the century. They plumbed the oceans, touched the earth’s poles, traversed its deserts and jungles, and pierced the veil of outer space. Years before Hubbard embarked on what he called his “exploration in the field of the mind,” he longed to walk with such immortal company.



When he was 20, in 1931, he fashioned himself into a character called Flash, a college kid who skipped class to barnstorm through the Midwest in an Arrow Sport biplane. The next year he left school completely, issued a call for “restless young men with wanderlust,” and sailed southward on what he dubbed the Caribbean Motion Picture Expedition. It was a magisterial flop, according to a new book by Lawrence Wright, ending with Hubbard’s crew hanging an effigy of him. But the new captain had soon recovered, surging as a writer of science fiction and other fabulous tales and sharing many back-slapping good times in New York, where his social scene overlapped enough with the Explorers Club that he was asked to apply.



To persuade the selection committee, he feathered his experiences into an astounding record. He claimed to have made “submarine movies,” sold pictures to National Geographic, and given “valued” data to the U.S. Navy. He boasted of a “complete mineralogical survey of Puerto Rico” and recounted “survey flights through the hinterland” of America. He told a story, in other words, but he told it well, and in early 1940, alongside men from the Carnegie and Field museums and an operative for the United Fruit Co., he was inducted into the club. It became “the only thing he took seriously and seemed prideful of,” according to a friend from the era. Evidently, even messiahs need somewhere to mingle.



But for the next 46 years, the club was more than Hubbard’s watering hole. It was his permanent home, and—in a messy life of multiple homes, marriages, and children—his most stable family. It was the place he got his mail and sent word of his wins and losses. It was the place that first published him on Dianetics and accredited his expeditions, disarmed by an obvious fondness for Hubbard and his high-action tales. Even as lawsuits, bad press, and government raids stained Hubbard’s reputation, the club supported him, protected his privacy, and mourned the death of its “distinguished” member in 1986.



Today Hubbard is part of the club’s Legacy Society, his name listed with the very men he once dreamed of joining. And the club itself is home to an unadvertised cache of Hubbard’s personal papers and other artifacts of Scientology’s early days, a peerless record of who Hubbard wanted to be, who he really was, and the leap he made from one to the other. Earlier this year, Wright published Going Clear, the latest exposé of Scientology and its founder and the latest to be fiercely contested by the church. But he never visited the archive. Neither, it seems, did his investigative predecessor Janet Reitman, author of Inside Scientology.



Newsweek did, finding still more material of interest to ax grinders, some of it damning to the church and its most cherished stories. But the most entrancing stuff is more basic. It’s just Ron being Ron, not the maligned leader of a religious movement, but another explorer just in from the world with exuberant tales of “pretty girls,” “iguana à rotisserie,” and “perhaps the strangest place an explorer can go,” inside the human mind.

Full article: http://www.thedailybeast.com/newswe...w-texts-from-scientology-s-l-ron-hubbard.html
 

PTS

Elliott
Re: Exclusive New Texts from L. Ron Hubbard

He was a bloody liar.
So what else is new?
 

Andtheyalllived

Patron with Honors
Re: Exclusive New Texts from L. Ron Hubbard

To persuade the selection committee, he feathered his experiences into an astounding record. He claimed to have made “submarine movies,” sold pictures to National Geographic, and given “valued” data to the U.S. Navy. He boasted of a “complete mineralogical survey of Puerto Rico” and recounted “survey flights through the hinterland” of America. He told a story, in other words, but he told it well, and in early 1940, alongside men from the Carnegie and Field museums and an operative for the United Fruit Co., he was inducted into the club. It became “the only thing he took seriously and seemed prideful of,” according to a friend from the era. Evidently, even messiahs need somewhere to mingle.

Full article: http://www.thedailybeast.com/newswe...w-texts-from-scientology-s-l-ron-hubbard.html

Yeah. Their "flawed human being" is NOT "just like the rest of us." No character, even less conscience. Pathological liar.

The most interesting thing about this article is how much Hubbard wanted to impress these people. Think some might have actually been what he wanted to be? So he turns to a crowd of follower-types who are much more easily impressed, and builds a cult.

Notice he didn't stretch his war record with these guys in the club. And there's no evidence of him bragging about his later "discoveries" to them, only "Hey, guys, I'm rich! That's cool, huh? You like me now? Send me some nouveau riche bling!"

Now we finally know who Hubbard considered his equals.
So, Hub-lubbers: Why didn't "Ron" share his amazing tech with his home-away-from-home guys?
His great gift to humanity. Maybe because they didn't like him much and he knew they'd laugh their asses off.

He reads like the one guy that the most sought-after frat at the school regrets accepting. And gotta wonder if club members' "grave reservations" about him or his stories were either communicated to him, or leaked down. I think they called him on it, but didn't kick him out.

These people were probably largely upper class (with resources to "adventure" and better positioned in society), better looking... I can imagine now why he was so disgusted with the ordinary schlubs he was surrounded by, in and out of the church.

I am reminded of The Great Gatsby.
 

CommunicatorIC

@IndieScieNews on Twitter
Re: Exclusive New Texts from L. Ron Hubbard

Story cross-submitted to Marty's blog as follows. Not yet moderated, approved or posted.

http://markrathbun.wordpress.com/2013/01/25/keeping-scientology-working/#comment-251321
CommunicatorIC | January 25, 2013 at 8:25 pm | Reply Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Newsweek / The Daily Beast: Exclusive New Texts from Scientology’s L. Ron Hubbard
(The texts were found at the Explorer’s Club.)
http://www.thedailybeast.com/newswe...w-texts-from-scientology-s-l-ron-hubbard.html

Tony Ortega:
http://tonyortega.org/2013/01/25/newsweek-confirms-it-l-ron-hubbard-was-a-blowhard/
 

Anonycat

Crusader
Re: Exclusive New Texts from L. Ron Hubbard

Yeah. Their "flawed human being" is NOT "just like the rest of us." No character, even less conscience. Pathological liar.

The most interesting thing about this article is how much Hubbard wanted to impress these people. Think some might have actually been what he wanted to be? So he turns to a crowd of follower-types who are much more easily impressed, and builds a cult.

Notice he didn't stretch his war record with these guys in the club. And there's no evidence of him bragging about his later "discoveries" to them, only "Hey, guys, I'm rich! That's cool, huh? You like me now? Send me some nouveau riche bling!"

Now we finally know who Hubbard considered his equals.
So, Hub-lubbers: Why didn't "Ron" share his amazing tech with his home-away-from-home guys?
His great gift to humanity. Maybe because they didn't like him much and he knew they'd laugh their asses off.

He reads like the one guy that the most sought-after frat at the school regrets accepting. And gotta wonder if club members' "grave reservations" about him or his stories were either communicated to him, or leaked down. I think they called him on it, but didn't kick him out.

These people were probably largely upper class (with resources to "adventure" and better positioned in society), better looking... I can imagine now why he was so disgusted with the ordinary schlubs he was surrounded by, in and out of the church.

I am reminded of The Great Gatsby.

It looked to me like he said a bunch of outrageous "explorer" lies in order to be accepted to what he wished he was qualified for.
 

Gib

Crusader
Re: Exclusive New Texts from L. Ron Hubbard

It looked to me like he said a bunch of outrageous "explorer" lies in order to be accepted to what he wished he was qualified for.

From "A Piece of Blue Sky" by Jon Atack

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Library/Shelf/atack/bs2-6.htm

"Although he has no formal training in Magick he has an extraordinary amount of experience and understanding in the field. From some of his experiences I deduce he is in direct touch with some higher intelligence, possibly his Guardian Angel. He is the most Thelemic person I have ever met and is in complete accord with our own principles. He is also interested in establishing the New Aeon, but for cogent reasons I have not introduced him to the Lodge."

Aeon = scientology = see hubbards admissions.

Aeon = The word aeon /ˈɒn/, also spelt eon, originally means "life" and/or "being", though it then tended to mean "age", "forever" or "for eternity".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeon
 

clamicide

Gold Meritorious Patron
Re: Exclusive New Texts from L. Ron Hubbard

omg... seriously?

I had the odd experience of creating huge cognitive dissonasance with a cultie who called me earlier this week... shared how I had been at the "death event" and how Miscavige was saying how that all the tech was now 100% because everything was being compared to the handwritten originals and so how it was all now 100% source, yet, the basics were then being reissued? Seriously, I could almost feel the cognitive dissonance going into overdrive...

it's good to be out, but it still bothers me that others are still in....
 
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