The true cost of becoming a Scientology cult member

OldAuditor

Patron with Honors
cults-251x300.jpg


You have probably read about the huge sums people pay to achieve the rarified heights of the Scientology OT levels and the stupifying amounts of money gouged out of them as donations to the IAS but these actions, as bizarre and pointless as they are, only cost money.

Have you considered the social and emotional costs, the lasting damage to health and mental stability, and the crushing loss of personal integrity that results from indoctrination into the dangerous modern day cult of Scientology?


When you spend all of your money and ruin yourself financially through your participation in Scientology, you can declare personal bankruptcy and be back in action in months. The bankruptcy stays on your record for 7 years but there are organizations ready to loan you money and get you back on your feet with a car almost immediately. The bankruptcy allows you to have fresh start and if you do the process standardly, you should not fall into the same trap again.


On the other hand, if you are a dedicated cult member and do everything possible to be a good Scientologist, by the time you have been in the cult for a few years you will have lost your sense of personal integrity and you will be operating without a first or second dynamic and most of your third dynamic. You will have a cult dynamic which replaces and supersedes any other organizational dynamic you had before you entered Scientology. It doesn’t happen overnight, but you are constantly indoctrinated on the importance of the Church of Scientology and its mission to clear the planet.


You will have no time for personal enhancement other than church directed enhancement and you will find excuses not to spend time with friends and family. You will spend all of your money on courses and auditing and donations to various crusades which are critical to clearing the planet.


You will not be going to your dentist or doctor for routine checkups and your personal possessions will become rather run down because you spend no time on maintenance except for emergency repairs. You become convinced that MEST is irrelevant and that tone 40 intention is what you need in order to survive.

Gradually you find yourself withdrawing from all outside activities and you spend all of your time on church activities. It bothers you that staff and execs still think of you as a dilettante but you keep on doing your best to keep your life together and support yourself while being on course as much as possible. No matter how much money you donate or how many hours you volunteer, there are always demands for more of both. Meanwhile, you are being recruited for staff or by Sea Org Recruiters at every possible opportunity.


As you get more involved in church activities, you find that you seem to upset various staff members and executives and Knowledge Reports are written on you for actions you did not do or even intend to do. You get made wrong more and more as pressure mounts to meet impossible targets which always seem to involve contributing money you do not have or making commitments you cannot fulfill.


Any effort to question management decisions will cause you to be accused of counter intention and results in you being sent for interviews with an Ethics officer whose role seems to be making you wrong in an effort to get more money or commitment from you.

By this time, you are fully indoctrinated and you are made to feel guilty for any independent action or thought. You are confused and have no place to turn as you are denied the option of referring to policy to protect yourself. You learn to your dismay that LRH policy does not apply if your senior or any staff member says it doesn’t apply.


You think of escaping and you learn of the penalties for abandoning the group. You get more and more terrified until you break down, or get seriously ill and get kicked out and denied further services even if you have paid for them.


You learn of a 30 year Sea Org veteran who was kicked off staff and left on the street in a wheel chair with $500 because she was too ill to do tours any more. You learn of staff and public who commit suicide when they were denied services after paying for them. Perhaps you decide that blowing staff is better than staying and experiencing more abuse.


If you manage to sneak away under cover of night or escape by simply walking away from the Org and never returning, you are subjected to every meanness that frustrated staff members can conceive of: Disconnection; Fair Game; noisy investigations by private detectives; threatening phone calls to clients, neighbors, friends and family which can destroy your business or private practice.


This is the true cost of being a cult member: the social and emotional costs, and the lasting damage to health and mental stability. If not addressed promptly by getting appropriate counseling and developing a support network, it can leave a person emotionally scarred for life. They can remain so bitter that they will attack any mention of betterment. In addition, they will still exhibit the identity they developed to survive as a group member. They are out of the cult but they still act like cult members when encountering challenging situations.


Leaving a cult is much harder than joining one. It can take years for a person to drop their cultish behavior. One of the most encouraging signs is when a person realizes they have been in a cult.


There are many people who have left the church who have never admitted they were in a cult. If you check Indy websites, see how many make no mention of a cult because they are still carrying on cult attitudes. Let’s see how that works out for them in the long run.


Cults create loyal, obedient slaves. It is better to avoid them at all costs.
 

Knows

Gold Meritorious Patron
That was a good write up Old Auditor and so true. The damage is unbelievable - the psyche is traumatized.

One thing that did stand out for me is being bitter about any type of betterment program.

I believe Scientology promises so much on different levels that the mind set when someone leaves is "looking to replace" that promise by finding a group that will fulfill that 'pounded in implant' that Scientology places huge emphasis on - it becomes the 'must have'. It did not happen is Scientology and it will never happen in the Wog World, as far as I know.

Scientology promised "one stop shopping" for spiritual freedom, group activities to help humanity, auditing, training, education, criminal rehab, drug rehab, WTH, drug awareness etc. All of it was a big huge hoax - Scientology does nothing in these fields of humanity - it actually does the opposite. THAT betrayal sucks so bad but why is it difficult to shed that desire to have it all. I never thought about it prior to the cult but now I have a desire for all of that I can't seem to shed easily.

What you post is true because of the trust that has been betrayed on so many levels from Scientology cult involvement. Other cults talk about this side effect as well. It is easy to get sucked into another cult; Multi-Level marketing cults, self-help cults, religious cults etc. I believe one has to shed the "cult implanted thinking filter" completely before getting involved in betterment programs are effective so it is a tricky situation.

I have seen friends go to straight into MLM's - a comfort zone IMHO. They grind away for years selling "pipe dreams" of getting rich quick and never making any money, addicted to the rah-rah seminars and pumped up cheerleading they get from "up-lines".

They are so used to working for nothing and paying for everything it is sad to see them chasing a carrot on a stick and never getting the carrot. They trust the "management" at the top who make all the money who are using them and will not care if they leave...a sucker is born every minute.

I have also seen friends get sucked right into religious cults. The abuse is not as extreme but it is like they need someone to tell them what to do, think and how to act.

I have read a lot about this in recovery from cult articles.

What do you think someone could do for betterment where they are safe from bad control?
 
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Purple Rain

Crusader
You had me until this bit.

They can remain so bitter that they will attack any mention of betterment. In addition, they will still exhibit the identity they developed to survive as a group member. They are out of the cult but they still act like cult members when encountering challenging situations.

To which I say BULL SHIT.

There are others who leave the cult and never realise they are still forwarding cult mechanisms put in place by the founder.

"9. The antisocial personality supports only destructive groups and rages against and attacks any constructive or betterment group.

10. This type of personality approves only of destructive actions and fights against constructive or helpful actions or activities.
The artist in particular is often found as a magnet for persons with antisocial personalities who see in his art something which must be destroyed and covertly, “as a friend,” proceed to try.

11. Helping others is an activity which drives the antisocial personality nearly berserk. Activities, however, which destroy in the name of help are closely supported."
 

George Layton

Silver Meritorious Patron
So how many folks that have left the cult are making money providing a spiritual betterment program off of people that have managed to leave the cult yet still believe in hubbard's take on reality? Seriously can't you just give them a break and let them go out and figure out life on their own without foisting another spiritual betterment program on them. Please try to understand that people have been through enough in the spiritual betterment program they have just escaped and their best shot at spiritual betterment is not being sold on the new improved version.
 

Boomima

Patron with Honors
...
What you post is true because of the trust that has been betrayed on so many levels from Scientology cult involvement. Other cults talk about this side effect as well. It is easy to get sucked into another cult; Multi-Level marketing cults, self-help cults, religious cults etc. I believe one has to shed the "cult implanted thinking filter" completely before getting involved in betterment programs are effective so it is a tricky situation.

I have seen friends go to straight into MLM's - a comfort zone IMHO. They grind away for years selling "pipe dreams" of getting rich quick and never making any money, addicted to the rah-rah seminars and pumped up cheerleading they get from "up-lines".

They are so used to working for nothing and paying for everything it is sad to see them chasing a carrot on a stick and never getting the carrot. They trust the "management" at the top who make all the money who are using them and will not care if they leave...a sucker is born every minute.

...
This is the sort of insight that you guys do best. Thank you for this.
 
cults-251x300.jpg


You have probably read about the huge sums people pay to achieve the rarified heights of the Scientology OT levels and the stupifying amounts of money gouged out of them as donations to the IAS but these actions, as bizarre and pointless as they are, only cost money.

Have you considered the social and emotional costs, the lasting damage to health and mental stability, and the crushing loss of personal integrity that results from indoctrination into the dangerous modern day cult of Scientology?


When you spend all of your money and ruin yourself financially through your participation in Scientology, you can declare personal bankruptcy and be back in action in months. The bankruptcy stays on your record for 7 years but there are organizations ready to loan you money and get you back on your feet with a car almost immediately. The bankruptcy allows you to have fresh start and if you do the process standardly, you should not fall into the same trap again.


On the other hand, if you are a dedicated cult member and do everything possible to be a good Scientologist, by the time you have been in the cult for a few years you will have lost your sense of personal integrity and you will be operating without a first or second dynamic and most of your third dynamic. You will have a cult dynamic which replaces and supersedes any other organizational dynamic you had before you entered Scientology. It doesn’t happen overnight, but you are constantly indoctrinated on the importance of the Church of Scientology and its mission to clear the planet.


You will have no time for personal enhancement other than church directed enhancement and you will find excuses not to spend time with friends and family. You will spend all of your money on courses and auditing and donations to various crusades which are critical to clearing the planet.


You will not be going to your dentist or doctor for routine checkups and your personal possessions will become rather run down because you spend no time on maintenance except for emergency repairs. You become convinced that MEST is irrelevant and that tone 40 intention is what you need in order to survive.

Gradually you find yourself withdrawing from all outside activities and you spend all of your time on church activities. It bothers you that staff and execs still think of you as a dilettante but you keep on doing your best to keep your life together and support yourself while being on course as much as possible. No matter how much money you donate or how many hours you volunteer, there are always demands for more of both. Meanwhile, you are being recruited for staff or by Sea Org Recruiters at every possible opportunity.


As you get more involved in church activities, you find that you seem to upset various staff members and executives and Knowledge Reports are written on you for actions you did not do or even intend to do. You get made wrong more and more as pressure mounts to meet impossible targets which always seem to involve contributing money you do not have or making commitments you cannot fulfill.


Any effort to question management decisions will cause you to be accused of counter intention and results in you being sent for interviews with an Ethics officer whose role seems to be making you wrong in an effort to get more money or commitment from you.

By this time, you are fully indoctrinated and you are made to feel guilty for any independent action or thought. You are confused and have no place to turn as you are denied the option of referring to policy to protect yourself. You learn to your dismay that LRH policy does not apply if your senior or any staff member says it doesn’t apply.


You think of escaping and you learn of the penalties for abandoning the group. You get more and more terrified until you break down, or get seriously ill and get kicked out and denied further services even if you have paid for them.


You learn of a 30 year Sea Org veteran who was kicked off staff and left on the street in a wheel chair with $500 because she was too ill to do tours any more. You learn of staff and public who commit suicide when they were denied services after paying for them. Perhaps you decide that blowing staff is better than staying and experiencing more abuse.


If you manage to sneak away under cover of night or escape by simply walking away from the Org and never returning, you are subjected to every meanness that frustrated staff members can conceive of: Disconnection; Fair Game; noisy investigations by private detectives; threatening phone calls to clients, neighbors, friends and family which can destroy your business or private practice.


This is the true cost of being a cult member: the social and emotional costs, and the lasting damage to health and mental stability. If not addressed promptly by getting appropriate counseling and developing a support network, it can leave a person emotionally scarred for life. They can remain so bitter that they will attack any mention of betterment. In addition, they will still exhibit the identity they developed to survive as a group member. They are out of the cult but they still act like cult members when encountering challenging situations.


Leaving a cult is much harder than joining one. It can take years for a person to drop their cultish behavior. One of the most encouraging signs is when a person realizes they have been in a cult.


There are many people who have left the church who have never admitted they were in a cult. If you check Indy websites, see how many make no mention of a cult because they are still carrying on cult attitudes. Let’s see how that works out for them in the long run.


Cults create loyal, obedient slaves. It is better to avoid them at all costs.

Where can we sign up for YOUR Koolaid?
 

I told you I was trouble

Suspended animation
Posted by Old Auditor

and snipped


This is the true cost of being a cult member: the social and emotional costs, and the lasting damage to health and mental stability. If not addressed promptly by getting appropriate counseling and developing a support network, it can leave a person emotionally scarred for life. They can remain so bitter that they will attack any mention of betterment. In addition, they will still exhibit the identity they developed to survive as a group member. They are out of the cult but they still act like cult members when encountering challenging situations.




Old Auditor ... by persisting to try and reg/recruit/train/hassle/enlighten/create "betterment" in people here, you are acting out your cult identity.





:biggrin:
 

Free Being Me

Crusader
Old Auditor, the I now what's wrong with you and I'm going to fix you for your own good mission is ironically what a $cientologist does. I had a conference with my entities and they agree your next move is either start handing out golden rod declares or realize the people here are just fine the way they are.
 

JustSheila

Crusader
Old Auditor,

I liked most of your write-up, except the parts already mentioned by others.

The thing is, part of a cult identity is "chasing the high" - looking for the WOW ZOWEE OMYGOD kick. That is not seeking spiritual enlightenment or improvement.

Abraham Maslow, philosopher, psychologist, and originator of the concentric circle of needs (includes physical, personal, social and spiritual needs) used to teach at Berkeley University, California. He gave up in frustration because he could not get his students to grasp the idea that there was absolutely nothing they could do that could force or hurry those key moments of insightfulness that come as a matter of course in one's life. Maslow's students got high on drugs or tried cults or other methods to try to hurry up those key, pivotal life moments. They sought enlightenment, alright, but the search itself made them miss the boat.

Think about that. THE SEARCH ITSELF CAUSED THEM TO MISS THEIR OWN ENLIGHTENMENT.

Nobody needs a spiritual leader to attain spiritual enlightenment. Nobody needs to follow a path or look at their past lives. Everything we need is right in front of us, every challenge we face demands we become better, and those challenges we have in each of our lives are tailored for us specifically, so that we can follow our individualised paths and journeys without interference. Problems and conflicts return when poor decisions are made, but disappear when the most responsible choice is made. Maturity reflects in wiser and wiser decisions - and better relationships with ourselves, others and whatever our concept of eternity may be.

If you actually believe those that don't follow the leader are disinterested in their own enlightenment, think again. I lead my own life. That is my badge of honour as an ex-Scientologist and ex-cult member. It is the greatest thing I ever gained from having been in and left Scientology.

THAT is freedom. THAT is self-determinism. Discarding the spiritual leader or other crutch and getting high on my own life is the greatest feeling of all. I don't need WOWEE ZOWEE anymore, but if it happens, great. If not, well, life is good, in fact, it is fascinating, and every day I live is a gift.
 

Knows

Gold Meritorious Patron
You had me until this bit.



To which I say BULL SHIT.

There are others who leave the cult and never realise they are still forwarding cult mechanisms put in place by the founder.

"9. The antisocial personality supports only destructive groups and rages against and attacks any constructive or betterment group.

10. This type of personality approves only of destructive actions and fights against constructive or helpful actions or activities.
The artist in particular is often found as a magnet for persons with antisocial personalities who see in his art something which must be destroyed and covertly, “as a friend,” proceed to try.

11. Helping others is an activity which drives the antisocial personality nearly berserk. Activities, however, which destroy in the name of help are closely supported."

It is part of the Scientological filter still implanted and it can't be helped - it is the TECH! Anyone that is critical of anything to do with Scientology or like type proo-cesses has got to be an SP!
 

TG1

Angelic Poster
I'm thinking some people must have an extreme Gullibility trait (either inherited or learned) that makes them trust any con man who says, "Follow me!"

Knows, you offered some great insight:

I have seen friends go to straight into MLM's - a comfort zone IMHO. They grind away for years selling "pipe dreams" of getting rich quick and never making any money, addicted to the rah-rah seminars and pumped up cheerleading they get from "up-lines".

They are so used to working for nothing and paying for everything it is sad to see them chasing a carrot on a stick and never getting the carrot. They trust the "management" at the top who make all the money who are using them and will not care if they leave...a sucker is born every minute.
 

RogerB

Crusader
An interesting opening post and equally interesting responses . . .

One of the things I have learned in my now long life is that folks operate on and within their belief systems. They have accepted and/or believe certain "facts" based on experience and these data or propositions about life and its interrelationships then, thereafter, dictate their behavior.

The tragedy is that folks often are operating on these belief systems blindly and on automatic.

Because of the above, I would say that it is rather unhelpful to make a person wrong for his or her belief systems but instead to endeavor to have the person address and inspect the basis and data of the beliefs they hold. Some folks are capable of inspecting their beliefs and upgrading and correcting them based on new experience.

Making a person wrong for their honestly accepted or developed beliefs only leads to disharmony and is unhelpful . . . indeed, it is detrimental to all involved including the party projecting the wrongness on the other person.

I've had many belief systems and data I've used and operated on in my life that have had to be undone or upgraded. Even within the realm of the physical universe and in strict physical universe terms they had proven wrong. I well remember some from my champion athlete days: and example being that we believed we should take some glucose or honey/sugar to "get some energy into the system" before a race . . . . What a wrong answer that turned out to be! In retrospect, better, later developed science showed that the action actually crashed the energy production/utilization system of the body and that having the body burning lipids was a better way to go.

I write this because I see a lot of belief systems being expressed above. And, of course, they are based on individual experiences.

The only point I would make on that is: was a wholly correct believe developed from the experience? Partially correct? Partly false? Wholly false?

As I wrote in my book and on my radio show website: All of Life is a Learning Curve.

Personally, I like to re-evaluate and reconsider the lessons I have "learned" from yore and continue to inspect such for truthfulness and true workability in present time.

It is, I have found, unwise to be hung up in the past too fixedly.

RogerB
 

Purple Rain

Crusader
It is part of the Scientological filter still implanted and it can't be helped - it is the TECH! Anyone that is critical of anything to do with Scientology or like type proo-cesses has got to be an SP!

I'm just so over being labeled that way, though, and to have somebody actually try and get me to agree to my own SP label is the icing on the cake.
 

Purple Rain

Crusader
An interesting opening post and equally interesting responses . . .

One of the things I have learned in my now long life is that folks operate on and within their belief systems. They have accepted and/or believe certain "facts" based on experience and these data or propositions about life and its interrelationships then, thereafter, dictate their behavior.

The tragedy is that folks often are operating on these belief systems blindly and on automatic.

Because of the above, I would say that it is rather unhelpful to make a person wrong for his or her belief systems but instead to endeavor to have the person address and inspect the basis and data of the beliefs they hold. Some folks are capable of inspecting their beliefs and upgrading and correcting them based on new experience.

Making a person wrong for their honestly accepted or developed beliefs only leads to disharmony and is unhelpful . . . indeed, it is detrimental to all involved including the party projecting the wrongness on the other person.

I've had many belief systems and data I've used and operated on in my life that have had to be undone or upgraded. Even within the realm of the physical universe and in strict physical universe terms they had proven wrong. I well remember some from my champion athlete days: and example being that we believed we should take some glucose or honey/sugar to "get some energy into the system" before a race . . . . What a wrong answer that turned out to be! In retrospect, better, later developed science showed that the action actually crashed the energy production/utilization system of the body and that having the body burning lipids was a better way to go.

I write this because I see a lot of belief systems being expressed above. And, of course, they are based on individual experiences.

The only point I would make on that is: was a wholly correct believe developed from the experience? Partially correct? Partly false? Wholly false?

As I wrote in my book and on my radio show website: All of Life is a Learning Curve.

Personally, I like to re-evaluate and reconsider the lessons I have "learned" from yore and continue to inspect such for truthfulness and true workability in present time.

It is, I have found, unwise to be hung up in the past too fixedly.

RogerB

If somebody is STILL trying to convince me of one of Hubbard's ludicrous datums then WHO is stuck in the past?? He has no more evidence for that proposition than Elron did, but just as he operated on "say it with enough authoritah and people will accept it as true" Old Auditor does the same. There is no way that he can prove that even ONE person here is rabidly against ANY spiritual betterment activity - let alone ANY betterment. But still he keeps stating the same claim as fact - like he doesn't need to substantiate it with cold hard fact. I am not going to humour him in the delusion that his OPINION is FACT unless he gives me actual data. What is his evidence for this claim? It's simply indefensible and unsupportable by actual data. Yet he keeps not only making the claim but trying to weasel it in after a whole stream of stuff he knows ex-Scientologists will agree with - he just sort of slips it in. I don't know why he is so desperate for us to agree with him that we are too damaged to let anybody else grow spiritually, but I think it was nothing short of intellectual cowardice to slip it in like that in the middle of everything else we could agree to. It was just how Elron suckered us into Scientology in the first place. Fuck that.

I'll never agree to that lie - and never leave it unchallenged no matter how he presents it.
 
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