U.S. Department of Education statistics on Church of Scientology Cadet School

CommunicatorIC

@IndieScieNews on Twitter
U.S. Department of Education statistics on Church of Scientology Cadet School.

I was researching something else and ran across the following.

Note the source is PSS Private School Universe Survey data for the 2013-2014 school year.

U.S Department of Education
Institute of Education Sciences
National Center for Education Statistics

https://nces.ed.gov/surveys/pss/pri...Search=1&County=Pinellas&State=12&ID=A0900847

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Miss Ellie

Miss Ellie
I homeschooled for years. I would love to see the Iowa Basic Skills test for the kids to see if on or above grade level. Small school/small classes should = well educated children.

These children should have a wonderful education experience since the "sciobots" are going to save the planet. A well educated child base would be something for the world to see and be impressed with.

Just think of 5th & 6th graders reading at a 12th grade level... working at high school or early college level math... or above average science scores.

These things are very doable with dedicated educators and bright happy children....

But... it would take a very safe, sane, loving environment - THAT would be amazing.

:eyeroll: :eyeroll: :eyeroll:
 

OutToe83

Patron with Honors
Anyone else notice the unusual distribution of students in the grades? Most communities have, on average, more children in lower grades than upper.

I'm chewing on why this distribution is so top-heavy. Perhaps it reflects the anomalous age distribution of staff? In a normal population, the number of older members is slightly lower for every year one counts upwards. In the $cn population, there are fewer and fewer young people joining. 5th graders typically have parents in their 30s. 12 graders typically have parents 7 years older.

I wonder if it also reflects how, the longer one stays in $cn, the less likely s/he is to leave? Or are the young adults with younger children more likely to blow when they see how the "Academy" compares to public schools?

Anyone else have any ideas?

EDIT: Just occurred to me that one common "ruin" in adults' lives that have them vulnerable to promises of a magic fix, is.....teenagers. More specifically, they're vulnerable to a promise of a magic tech that promises to deliver ability to talk to their teens and have their teens talk to them, in a happily communicating family circle. If that's it...BOY, are they in for a surprise! :omg:
 

Freeminds

Bitter defrocked apostate
"Library: no" These poor kids don't have a chance.

Thanks to CommunicatorIC for continuing to expose Hubbardfail and the lies that outlived the old bastard.
 

Jump

Operating teatime
"Library: no" These poor kids don't have a chance.

Thanks to CommunicatorIC for continuing to expose Hubbardfail and the lies that outlived the old bastard.



Probably more like..

Library: Forced to tick 'No' because Hubbard publications do not qualify.
 

George Layton

Silver Meritorious Patron
Anyone else notice the unusual distribution of students in the grades? Most communities have, on average, more children in lower grades than upper.

I'm chewing on why this distribution is so top-heavy. Perhaps it reflects the anomalous age distribution of staff? In a normal population, the number of older members is slightly lower for every year one counts upwards. In the $cn population, there are fewer and fewer young people joining. 5th graders typically have parents in their 30s. 12 graders typically have parents 7 years older.

I wonder if it also reflects how, the longer one stays in $cn, the less likely s/he is to leave? Or are the young adults with younger children more likely to blow when they see how the "Academy" compares to public schools?

Anyone else have any ideas?

EDIT: Just occurred to me that one common "ruin" in adults' lives that have them vulnerable to promises of a magic fix, is.....teenagers. More specifically, they're vulnerable to a promise of a magic tech that promises to deliver ability to talk to their teens and have their teens talk to them, in a happily communicating family circle. If that's it...BOY, are they in for a surprise! :omg:


The younger children are still in the Sea Org. and haven't gotten to that, "WTF am I doing this crap for?", stage at which time they will be sent away to get re-indoctrinated.
 

CommunicatorIC

@IndieScieNews on Twitter
I want to emphasize the following.

Three teachers for 112 students. Student/Teacher ratio of 37.3.

Three teachers for eight grades (i.e., 5 through 12). That is, likely: (a) two teachers simultaneously teach three grades; while (b) one lucky teacher gets to simultaneously only two grades.
 

FlagEmDown

Patron
I think the large numbers in the higher grades reflect students that aren't really students, but rather sea orgers. scientology claims that teenage recruits to sea org get to finish their high school & get their grade 12 diploma. IMHO, it's a farce. They just don't want the bad PR that would result if it became wildly known that they take kids away from their education.
 

TeaRose

Patron
No, that ratio is not low compared to most public schools. It's wildly over capacity, and resembles Detroit crisis schools.
 

Type4_PTS

Diamond Invictus SP
The student/teacher numbers are low compared to public school.

According to this link (with stats from Dept of Education), the student/teacher ratio for private schools was 12.5 (back in 2011), and 16.0 for public schools.

So the figure reported by Scientology is triple the average for other private schools, and over double the average figure for public schools.

Note, the actual class size can be much larger than the student/teacher ratio which is explained here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Student–teacher_ratio (see section on "Relationship to Class Size")
 

Dulloldfart

Squirrel Extraordinaire
I want to emphasize the following.

Three teachers for 112 students. Student/Teacher ratio of 37.3.

Three teachers for eight grades (i.e., 5 through 12). That is, likely: (a) two teachers simultaneously teach three grades; while (b) one lucky teacher gets to simultaneously only two grades.

Don't the students use self-study checksheets, as opposed to a teacher lecturing to the whole class? When I was supervising a courseroom in the HGB I would sometimes have a minor doing schoolwork at the same time as the adults doing the regular courses. There was no big difference.

Paul
 

RogerB

Crusader
What I noticed is the race/ethnic make up . . . it does not mirror the population mix of either the US or the local community.

Looks like, the cult is pulling in (and trapping) foreigners to staff up and run the enterprise.

R
 

secretiveoldfag

Silver Meritorious Patron
What I noticed is the race/ethnic make up . . . it does not mirror the population mix of either the US or the local community.

Looks like, the cult is pulling in (and trapping) foreigners to staff up and run the enterprise.

R

Scientology and Religious Workers Visas by Jeff Jacobsen

http://www.lisamcpherson.org/visas.htm

DOX: Government disclosure shows extent of Scientology’s reliance on cheap foreign labor

http://tonyortega.org/2016/01/13/do...scientologys-reliance-on-cheap-foreign-labor/
 
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