"Going Clear" by Larry Wright - Book Reviews

JustMe

Patron Meritorious
I know there are threads about the release of his book, organized scientology's "attacking" this book and Marty Rathbun being critical of his book.

I thought though I would start a thread for all of us who have read the book and wanted to review it.

I will start the ball rolling by giving my honest review which I just put up on Amazon:


http://www.amazon.com/gp/pdp/profile/A3INT0L85FO4SI/ref=cm_cr_pr_pdp



If you want read the book before seeing what is in effect a "surprise ending" of an admission by Hubbard before dying, don't read this review.

FWIW here are my honest feelings about it for those who don't want to go to Amazon:

This was by far the most insightful and well researched book on L Ron Hubbard, David Miscavige and Scientology that I have ever read.

In researching the material for the book the author and his assistants spoke with an unprecedented number of people (some 250 or so) who studied, witnessed and/or were part of the history of Scientology and its leaders.

The bibliography of the Scientology sources, media, books, articles and manuscript collections that the author consulted in studying the subjects shows the great pain that was clearly taken not only to be thorough with the facts in the book but also to try analyze the true story behind those facts and what it was that made both Hubbard and Miscavige (Scientology's two main leaders overthe years) what they were.

I believe Lawrence Wright has accomplished that well beyond anything ever published. And he did it in an objective, professional way while constantly striving to be fair.

There are also some 42 pages of detailed notes near the end of the book where the author gives his sources for what he wrote in the book, page by page.Simply amazing!

In my opinion this book could not even have been written had not Project Chanology Anonymous (acknowledged in the book) suddenly made it possible for thousands to come forward and speak out without being destroyed by Scientology's intelligence and litigation machine designed to stop others from freely speaking out.

Where one or a few of us have managed to speak out before or even protest,suddenly thousands donned the mask and marched in unison and in protest starting on February 10, 2008. The beauty of that was how it opened the door to many others coming out, speaking and taking a stance. This had turned the tide. Organized Scientology could not stop them and they were joined by so many others who finally saw they could stand up and speak out.

Simply put, without the actions started by Anonymous in 2008 many of thesources for this book would not have felt safe to come out and tell the truth.Thus this book could not have been written.

A great deal (but hardly all) of the facts covered in this book have been covered before. But the book lays out those facts in a clear, concise manner that helps the reader to understand not only the story of scientology but what it was that made its leaders what they became.

The author compassionately explores the life of L Ron Hubbard from his childhood, through his marriages, his time in the military, his friendships, his loves and his early writings. In countless writings and recordings about Hubbard in the past (if only on internet forum postings) writers often debated and tried to understand Hubbard as clearly one or the other: kind or cruel, aliar or a man of truth, sane or insane, a conman or an honest man, an abuser or a healer.

I think what the author tried to show was that Hubbard at different points was all of the above.

Combining Hubbard's own Affirmations with how he actually led his life, in my opinion the author gives a highly insightful perspective of Hubbard. It can be found onpage 54 of this book:

"If one looks behind the Affirmations to the condition they are meant to correct one sees a man who is ashamed of his tendency to fabricate personal stories, who is conflicted about his sexual needs, and who worries about his mortality. He has a predatory view of women but at the same time fears their power to humiliate him".

While we are each of us at times conflicted, even walking contradictions throughout our lives, the real problem with Hubbard's own conflicts as well covered in this book is was what they did to destroy the lives of so very many people over decades and indeed to this day some 27 years after Hubbard's death.

Some of the very worst parts of Hubbard became the very fabric of Scientology and organized Scientology. Woven throughout the policies and practices of organized Scientology one can see Hubbard's own paranoia and cruelty. Such things as the heartless internment camps known as "the Rehabilitation Project Force", heavy ethics for counter and other intentions (to hisown), the cruelty of disconnection and so much more was all to protect a technology Hubbard called priceless but was rather valueless to most who tried it.

As covered in the book, Hubbard's conflicts are also reflected in his writings where he saw enemies everywhere and demanded the destruction of all who opposed his will.

His incessant demands for money combined with his disdain of those who thought differently than he destroyed perhaps thousands of families, even lives. And, like Hubbard before him, David Miscavige to this day continues to profit on the anguish of others while cowardly hiding behind organized Scientology's myriad corporate veils so as not to be held liable for that of which he is completely liable.

As shown in this book, the stories of widespread abuse of children, beatings, forced incarcerations, financial scandals, greed, medical abuse and the like rampant within organized Scientology both through the times of Hubbard and continuing to this very day are as painful to see as they are numerous. The cruelty meted out on others in the name of "salvaging the planet" while profiting Hubbard and Miscavige is breathtaking in its scope.

One horrid example that has me in tears just to read it can be found page 157of the book. It is about an abused, pregnant mother sneaking out of the scientology's "Rehabilitation Project Force" without approval to see how her daughter was doing in the Scientology "Child Care Org":

"Taylor managed to slip away to visit her ten-month-old daughter in the Child Care Org across the street. To her horror, she discovered that Venessa had contracted whopping cough, which is highly contagious and occasionally fatal. The baby's eyes were welded shut with mucus, and her diaper was wet - infact her whole crib was soaking. She was covered with fruit flies. Taylor recoiled. The prospect of losing both her unborn baby and her daughter seemed very likely".

My God!!!!

So many misled people of good heart were and are a part of Scientology who themselves put it all on the line to dedicate themselves and their lives to the following of a man who would ultimately betray them. This book makes me feel a sadness for all the good souls who cared and who tried to follow a dream and were betrayed.

I love how insightful the author is when he analyzes the facts before him and tries to make it make sense. For example, as the book points out, Hubbard wrote a great deal of science fiction before he ever wrote anything about Scientology. And there are strong elements of science fiction in the hidden levels of Scientology. Reflecting on both, the author makes a simple yet in my opinion insightful statement on page 32 of the book:

"Certainly, the same mind that roamed so freely through imaginary universes might be inclined to look at the everyday world and suspect that there was something more behind the surface reality. The broad canvas of science fiction allowed Hubbard to think in large-scale terms about the human condition. He was bold. He was fanciful. He could easily invent an elaborate, plausible universe. But it is one thing to make that universe believable, and another to believe it. That is the difference between art and religion".

I agree with the author that while one can argue that Scientology is a religion it must not be allowed to carry out such horrid abuses on countless others while hiding from prosecution behind the cloak of religion.

More than whether or not Scientology is indeed a religion I think the really important question is whether or not it is charitable or even spiritual. I see nothing spiritual at all about Hubbard's and Miscavige's abuse of others, the incessant demands for money and just hundreds and hundreds of things that make up the very fabric of organized Scientology and the policies it follows.

Perhaps even more importantly, as is clear in reading the book, there is nothing inherently charitable about Scientology. People have to either pay vast sums or give up their personal freedoms to "progress" in Scientology.Their benign-sounding front groups in the field of business, education, drug abuse and the like are not there to freely help the downtrodden or otherwise needy. They are there solely to themselves be a conduit of money and people into Scientology. They are "PR" to try to make organized Scientology look good to the public while in many cases are themselves a danger to the public.

In the book examples are given where others speak of Hubbard's"research" and his "technology" that has helped them. And I am glad they were helped.

But Hubbard's research has no scientific validity and in my opinion is often the product of a deranged mind thinking that somehow he has made these brilliant scientific discoveries when he has not.

An example from the book is Hubbard's "research" resulting in "The Introspection Rundown" which, Hubbard says eliminates the last need for psychiatry. "Evidence" of its value is a story of a man who was crazed on a ship and a danger to others. Hubbard had him confined and treated gently and given healthy supplements. The man came out of it. I am so glad this happened to this man but my God that is hardly scientific study showing Hubbard's procedure eliminates the last need of psychiatry.

Related to this, the book debunks Hubbard's claims about psychology and medication in effect showing how Scientology not only may not help a person but it will often keep a person away from the very sources that can indeed help him.

Examples of this are given in the book including the death of a beautiful boy Kyle Brennan who died from an apparent suicide at Scientology's"mecca" in Florida after his medically prescribed medication was taken away from him due to Scientology's unfounded beliefs from Hubbard's writings.

And, carrying on from what Hubbard preached, the book tells of a speech given by Scientology's current abusive leader David Miscavige saying that he intends to obliterate psychiatry, wiping it from the face of the earth.

My God how dangerous a view is that?

People have had "wins" in Scientology therapy which the author feels is akin more to psychotherapy which perhaps is Scientology's "more respectable cousin". But I submit that some of the beautiful and well-meaning people who are trying to help others using this"therapy" are more helping those people because they are good and kind people who give the others someone to whom they can pour out their hearts and discuss their troubles.

And that is all well and good until someone really needs professional help and there is no one within Scientology who is trained to give that help.

Later in the book, on page 359, the author speaks of how Scientology wants to be understood as a scientific approach to spiritual enlightenment but concludes that it really has no basis in science at all. Perhaps, he says, it would be better understood as a philosophy of the human nature.

As usual organized Scientology denies everything in this book that is negative. I would like to believe them but I can't. Although I was a small contributor of information to Lawrence Wright in his research, I know of so much of this book as being true from first hand observation.

I feel love and compassion for the many, many good souls who are Scientologists and who are trying to help others. I was once one of them. But I also feel a great sadness of just how these people were and are being betrayed by Hubbard, by Miscavige and indeed by a dream of a "heaven" which to many of them has turned out to be a "hell".

I wish all of them the greatest of healing and of peace. And I want them to know there are many of us out here with open arms ready to welcome them to join us as imperfect but free sisters and brothers who will help them heal.

And I wish to express my great thanks to Lawrence Wright and all who assisted him for this magnificent work that I believe will end up helping many people.

Perhaps the real sadness of all this is best reflected in some of the final words from the book telling of a time that was a few weeks before Hubbard's death when Hubbard summoned one he trusted at a ranch where he was hiding:

"Six weeks before the leader died, Pfauth hesitantly related, Hubbard called him into the bus. He was sitting in his little breakfast nook. `He told me he was dropping his body.......He told me he failed, he's leaving.'..............................

I mentioned the legend in Scientology that Hubbard would return.

`That's bull crap,' Pfauth said. `He wanted to drop the body and leave. And he told me basically that he failed. All the work and everything, he'd failed".


brb sad
 
Last edited:

Veda

Sponsor
I know there are threads about the release of his book, organized scientology's "attacking" this book and Marty Rathbun being critical of his book.

I thought though I would start a thread for all of us who have read the book and wanted to review it.

I will start the ball rolling by giving my honest review which I just put up on Amazon:


http://www.amazon.com/gp/pdp/profile/A3INT0L85FO4SI/ref=cm_cr_pr_pdp



If you want read the book before seeing what is in effect a "surprise ending" of an admission by Hubbard before dying, don't read this review.

FWIW here are my honest feelings about it for those who don't want to go to Amazon:

Thanks for the informative review - as always. :)

I haven't yet read the book, so I won't say much. I have read the 'Affirmations', and am reminded that in them Hubbard affirmed that he will "live to be 200 years old."

I'm not sure how to take Sarge Pfauth's account. Was it simply a depressed Hubbard, reminiscent of the "I failed" Hubbard post-Rhodesia circa 1966/1967? If Hubbard was saying that Scientology, as a "Bridge to Total Freedom and Total Power," and to "OT," etc., was not so, it would have been nice if he had told the Scientologists about it, so they wouldn't be dedicating their lives to it.

Instead, Hubbard left Scientologists with writings assuring them that Scientology has the answers. He even used as a gimmick - and he knew it to be a gimmick, and is on record as describing it as such - the word, "eternity," I think it was 11 times, in his essay, 'From Clear to Eternity', in an obvious attempt to frighten and cower, and, similarly, in 'Ron's Journal 30', he described the fate of those who did not follow his "Bridge": "Some religions talk about hell. It's an understatement of what really happens." And there are many other examples.

It's unfortunate that Hubbard, in his depression, did not think of the Scientologists, and of those who were yet to be sucked into Scientology. It would have been nice if he could have told them instead of just feeling sorry for himself.

And to those who have read the book. This is the place to deposit your reviews.

And by the way, can someone re-post the text of JustMe's review so that it can be easily copied and re-re-posted inside ESMB?

Thanks. :)
 

ChurchOfCylontology

Patron with Honors
I know there are threads about the release of his book, organized scientology's "attacking" this book and Marty Rathbun being critical of his book.

I thought though I would start a thread for all of us who have read the book and wanted to review it.

I will start the ball rolling by giving my honest review which I just put up on Amazon:


http://www.amazon.com/gp/pdp/profile/A3INT0L85FO4SI/ref=cm_cr_pr_pdp



If you want read the book before seeing what is in effect a "surprise ending" of an admission by Hubbard before dying, don't read this review.

FWIW here are my honest feelings about it for those who don't want to go to Amazon:

Denise, you are an amazing lady and I loved your review of Wright's book, but I still disagree with giving Rathbun any stars for his "books".
 

ILove2Lurk

Lisbeth Salander
I thought though I would start a thread for all of us who have read the book and wanted to review it.

Thanks for starting a "spoilers ahead" thread of sorts, where we can chat openly.

I didn't want to give away the plots lines or the "ending of the movie" to those who hadn't seen it yet. :yes:

:thumbsup:
 
Last edited:

HelluvaHoax!

Platinum Meritorious Sponsor with bells on
.....

REPOSTED FROM THE STUPID THREAD



There is something incredibly stupid about Hubbard's statement to the world that: "We shall not speculate here on how I came to rise above the bank." I feel certain there must be a "tech" in how that was made possible. . .

From JustMe, excerpted from a review of Larry Wright's book "Going Clear..." on another thread and Amazon:

Originally Posted by JustMe
"Some of the very worst parts of Hubbard became the very fabric of Scientology and organized Scientology. Woven throughout the policies and practices of organized Scientology one can see Hubbard's own paranoia and cruelty. Such things as the heartless internment camps known as "the Rehabilitation Project Force", heavy ethics for counter and other intentions (to hisown), the cruelty of disconnection and so much more was all to protect a technology Hubbard called priceless but was rather valueless to most who tried it.


As covered in the book, Hubbard's conflicts are also reflected in his writings where he saw enemies everywhere and demanded the destruction of all who opposed his will.

His incessant demands for money combined with his disdain of those who thought differently than he destroyed perhaps thousands of families, even lives. And, like Hubbard before him, David Miscavige to this day continues to profit on the anguish of others while cowardly hiding behind organized Scientology's myriad corporate veils so as not to be held liable for that of which he is completely liable......."

Tracking the "rise" of L. Ron Hubbard as he "rose above" the reactive mind-driven mediocrities and pathetic inadequacies of the species known as Homo sapiens, one is soon reminded of the extraordinary separation Hubbard was able to place between himself and the humans, far below. These ever-increasing altitudes and distances are, not surprisingly, to be expected from a soaring Homo Novus with godlike powers.

However, on closer inspection, quite surprisingly, one realizes that Hubbard achieved these extraordinary distances to the mortals below not by ascending to greater deified heights--but instead by forcefully crushing downward and submerging the natural buoyancy of normal people.

This is one of Hubbard's greatest discoveries, in fact, that is is far easier to "rise above" others not by climbing upscale to OT, but by simply oppressing others downward.

 

Dulloldfart

Squirrel Extraordinaire
And by the way, can someone re-post the text of JustMe's review so that it can be easily copied and re-re-posted inside ESMB?

Thanks. :)

Sure. This is JustMe's review:

This was by far the most insightful and well researched book on L Ron Hubbard, David Miscavige and Scientology that I have ever read.

In researching the material for the book the author and his assistants spoke with an unprecedented number of people (some 250 or so) who studied, witnessed and/or were part of the history of Scientology and its leaders.

The bibliography of the Scientology sources, media, books, articles and manuscript collections that the author consulted in studying the subjects shows the great pain that was clearly taken not only to be thorough with the facts in the book but also to try analyze the true story behind those facts and what it was that made both Hubbard and Miscavige (Scientology's two main leaders overthe years) what they were.

I believe Lawrence Wright has accomplished that well beyond anything ever published. And he did it in an objective, professional way while constantly striving to be fair.

There are also some 42 pages of detailed notes near the end of the book where the author gives his sources for what he wrote in the book, page by page.Simply amazing!

In my opinion this book could not even have been written had not Project Chanology Anonymous (acknowledged in the book) suddenly made it possible for thousands to come forward and speak out without being destroyed by Scientology's intelligence and litigation machine designed to stop others from freely speaking out.

Where one or a few of us have managed to speak out before or even protest,suddenly thousands donned the mask and marched in unison and in protest starting on February 10, 2008. The beauty of that was how it opened the door to many others coming out, speaking and taking a stance. This had turned the tide. Organized Scientology could not stop them and they were joined by so many others who finally saw they could stand up and speak out.

Simply put, without the actions started by Anonymous in 2008 many of thesources for this book would not have felt safe to come out and tell the truth.Thus this book could not have been written.

A great deal (but hardly all) of the facts covered in this book have been covered before. But the book lays out those facts in a clear, concise manner that helps the reader to understand not only the story of scientology but what it was that made its leaders what they became.

The author compassionately explores the life of L Ron Hubbard from his childhood, through his marriages, his time in the military, his friendships, his loves and his early writings. In countless writings and recordings about Hubbard in the past (if only on internet forum postings) writers often debated and tried to understand Hubbard as clearly one or the other: kind or cruel, aliar or a man of truth, sane or insane, a conman or an honest man, an abuser or a healer.

I think what the author tried to show was that Hubbard at different points was all of the above.

Combining Hubbard's own Affirmations with how he actually led his life, in my opinion the author gives a highly insightful perspective of Hubbard. It can be found onpage 54 of this book:

"If one looks behind the Affirmations to the condition they are meant to correct one sees a man who is ashamed of his tendency to fabricate personal stories, who is conflicted about his sexual needs, and who worries about his mortality. He has a predatory view of women but at the same time fears their power to humiliate him".

While we are each of us at times conflicted, even walking contradictions throughout our lives, the real problem with Hubbard's own conflicts as well covered in this book is was what they did to destroy the lives of so very many people over decades and indeed to this day some 27 years after Hubbard's death.

Some of the very worst parts of Hubbard became the very fabric of Scientology and organized Scientology. Woven throughout the policies and practices of organized Scientology one can see Hubbard's own paranoia and cruelty. Such things as the heartless internment camps known as "the Rehabilitation Project Force", heavy ethics for counter and other intentions (to hisown), the cruelty of disconnection and so much more was all to protect a technology Hubbard called priceless but was rather valueless to most who tried it.

As covered in the book, Hubbard's conflicts are also reflected in his writings where he saw enemies everywhere and demanded the destruction of all who opposed his will.

His incessant demands for money combined with his disdain of those who thought differently than he destroyed perhaps thousands of families, even lives. And, like Hubbard before him, David Miscavige to this day continues to profit on the anguish of others while cowardly hiding behind organized Scientology's myriad corporate veils so as not to be held liable for that of which he is completely liable.

As shown in this book, the stories of widespread abuse of children, beatings, forced incarcerations, financial scandals, greed, medical abuse and the like rampant within organized Scientology both through the times of Hubbard and continuing to this very day are as painful to see as they are numerous. The cruelty meted out on others in the name of "salvaging the planet" while profiting Hubbard and Miscavige is breathtaking in its scope.

One horrid example that has me in tears just to read it can be found page 157of the book. It is about an abused, pregnant mother sneaking out of the scientology's "Rehabilitation Project Force" without approval to see how her daughter was doing in the Scientology "Child Care Org":

"Taylor managed to slip away to visit her ten-month-old daughter in the Child Care Org across the street. To her horror, she discovered that Venessa had contracted whopping cough, which is highly contagious and occasionally fatal. The baby's eyes were welded shut with mucus, and her diaper was wet - infact her whole crib was soaking. She was covered with fruit flies. Taylor recoiled. The prospect of losing both her unborn baby and her daughter seemed very likely".

My God!!!!

So many misled people of good heart were and are a part of Scientology who themselves put it all on the line to dedicate themselves and their lives to the following of a man who would ultimately betray them. This book makes me feel a sadness for all the good souls who cared and who tried to follow a dream and were betrayed.

I love how insightful the author is when he analyzes the facts before him and tries to make it make sense. For example, as the book points out, Hubbard wrote a great deal of science fiction before he ever wrote anything about Scientology. And there are strong elements of science fiction in the hidden levels of Scientology. Reflecting on both, the author makes a simple yet in my opinion insightful statement on page 32 of the book:

"Certainly, the same mind that roamed so freely through imaginary universes might be inclined to look at the everyday world and suspect that there was something more behind the surface reality. The broad canvas of science fiction allowed Hubbard to think in large-scale terms about the human condition. He was bold. He was fanciful. He could easily invent an elaborate, plausible universe. But it is one thing to make that universe believable, and another to believe it. That is the difference between art and religion".

I agree with the author that while one can argue that Scientology is a religion it must not be allowed to carry out such horrid abuses on countless others while hiding from prosecution behind the cloak of religion.

More than whether or not Scientology is indeed a religion I think the really important question is whether or not it is charitable or even spiritual. I see nothing spiritual at all about Hubbard's and Miscavige's abuse of others, the incessant demands for money and just hundreds and hundreds of things that make up the very fabric of organized Scientology and the policies it follows.

Perhaps even more importantly, as is clear in reading the book, there is nothing inherently charitable about Scientology. People have to either pay vast sums or give up their personal freedoms to "progress" in Scientology.Their benign-sounding front groups in the field of business, education, drug abuse and the like are not there to freely help the downtrodden or otherwise needy. They are there solely to themselves be a conduit of money and people into Scientology. They are "PR" to try to make organized Scientology look good to the public while in many cases are themselves a danger to the public.

In the book examples are given where others speak of Hubbard's"research" and his "technology" that has helped them. And I am glad they were helped.

But Hubbard's research has no scientific validity and in my opinion is often the product of a deranged mind thinking that somehow he has made these brilliant scientific discoveries when he has not.

An example from the book is Hubbard's "research" resulting in "The Introspection Rundown" which, Hubbard says eliminates the last need for psychiatry. "Evidence" of its value is a story of a man who was crazed on a ship and a danger to others. Hubbard had him confined and treated gently and given healthy supplements. The man came out of it. I am so glad this happened to this man but my God that is hardly scientific study showing Hubbard's procedure eliminates the last need of psychiatry.

Related to this, the book debunks Hubbard's claims about psychology and medication in effect showing how Scientology not only may not help a person but it will often keep a person away from the very sources that can indeed help him.

Examples of this are given in the book including the death of a beautiful boy Kyle Brennan who died from an apparent suicide at Scientology's"mecca" in Florida after his medically prescribed medication was taken away from him due to Scientology's unfounded beliefs from Hubbard's writings.

And, carrying on from what Hubbard preached, the book tells of a speech given by Scientology's current abusive leader David Miscavige saying that he intends to obliterate psychiatry, wiping it from the face of the earth.

My God how dangerous a view is that?

People have had "wins" in Scientology therapy which the author feels is akin more to psychotherapy which perhaps is Scientology's "more respectable cousin". But I submit that some of the beautiful and well-meaning people who are trying to help others using this"therapy" are more helping those people because they are good and kind people who give the others someone to whom they can pour out their hearts and discuss their troubles.

And that is all well and good until someone really needs professional help and there is no one within Scientology who is trained to give that help.

Later in the book, on page 359, the author speaks of how Scientology wants to be understood as a scientific approach to spiritual enlightenment but concludes that it really has no basis in science at all. Perhaps, he says, it would be better understood as a philosophy of the human nature.

As usual organized Scientology denies everything in this book that is negative. I would like to believe them but I can't. Although I was a small contributor of information to Lawrence Wright in his research, I know of so much of this book as being true from first hand observation.

I feel love and compassion for the many, many good souls who are Scientologists and who are trying to help others. I was once one of them. But I also feel a great sadness of just how these people were and are being betrayed by Hubbard, by Miscavige and indeed by a dream of a "heaven" which to many of them has turned out to be a "hell".

I wish all of them the greatest of healing and of peace. And I want them to know there are many of us out here with open arms ready to welcome them to join us as imperfect but free sisters and brothers who will help them heal.

And I wish to express my great thanks to Lawrence Wright and all who assisted him for this magnificent work that I believe will end up helping many people.

Perhaps the real sadness of all this is best reflected in some of the final words from the book telling of a time that was a few weeks before Hubbard's death when Hubbard summoned one he trusted at a ranch where he was hiding:

"Six weeks before the leader died, Pfauth hesitantly related, Hubbard called him into the bus. He was sitting in his little breakfast nook. `He told me he was dropping his body.......He told me he failed, he's leaving.'..............................

I mentioned the legend in Scientology that Hubbard would return.

`That's bull crap,' Pfauth said. `He wanted to drop the body and leave. And he told me basically that he failed. All the work and everything, he'd failed".

-----

I'll make one comment about Pfauth's story. It paints the picture that SIX WEEKS before Hubbard died he said he was going to die, i.e., this was a month before the stroke that killed him. Isn't Pfauth still a Ron-lover? Convenient that despite being a "failure" Hubbard was still able to predict/cause his own imminent death.

Paul
 

NoName

A Girl Has No Name
I'll make one comment about Pfauth's story. It paints the picture that SIX WEEKS before Hubbard died he said he was going to die, i.e., this was a month before the stroke that killed him. Isn't Pfauth still a Ron-lover? Convenient that despite being a "failure" Hubbard was still able to predict/cause his own imminent death.

Paul

I don't know Pfauth, but I don't think it is a big stretch to know that you're dying. I don't know if LRH predicted the time line - if he did, that might change my opinion. But in general, it isn't a stretch for some old decrepit guy (especially after multiple heart attacks, strokes, and probably some smoking complications) to be waddling winded around a trailer, realize his mortality, and say something like that.

I suppose that a Kool Aid drinker could read into that as LRH planning to drop his body and think that it was all very theta the way it went down, but I just think it's a sickly old man realizing he's not immortal.
 

Random guy

Patron with Honors
I don't know Pfauth, but I don't think it is a big stretch to know that you're dying.

I've seen people dying from comparable conditions. Death from decease is not an on/off process, the body start to shut down the less important parts as the systems start to falter. You die from the toes up so to speak. And yes, those in that situation are usually very aware their days are up.
 

HelluvaHoax!

Platinum Meritorious Sponsor with bells on
I don't know Pfauth, but I don't think it is a big stretch to know that you're dying. I don't know if LRH predicted the time line - if he did, that might change my opinion. But in general, it isn't a stretch for some old decrepit guy (especially after multiple heart attacks, strokes, and probably some smoking complications) to be waddling winded around a trailer, realize his mortality, and say something like that.

I suppose that a Kool Aid drinker could read into that as LRH planning to drop his body and think that it was all very theta the way it went down, but I just think it's a sickly old man realizing he's not immortal.


Hey, Ron had knowingness he was gonna leave the planet a long time before he postulated his meat machine into that mest motorhome:

“I'll not always be here on guard.
The stars twinkle in the Milky Way and the wind sighs for songs
across the empty fields of a planet a Galaxy away."

- L. Ron Hubbard -

TRANSLATION: One day I will not be guarding you or somehow you will escape the security guards that I have working for me. Don't bother trying to find me for "payback" because I will be in another Galaxy. LOL. Anyways, thanks for the money and being my slaves. Just about now, you people should be getting a cognition about this entire hoax, right? So don't complain that I never gave you anything.
 

afaceinthecrowd

Gold Meritorious Patron
I've seen people dying from comparable conditions. Death from decease is not an on/off process, the body start to shut down the less important parts as the systems start to falter. You die from the toes up so to speak. And yes, those in that situation are usually very aware their days are up.

:thumbsup::yes:

1. El Ron told David Mayo on at least one occaision, 4 or so years prior to Hisself's death, that Hisself was going to "drop" the body soon.

2. I have had four elderly/infirmed Folks tell me they were going to die soon...several weeks to 6 weeks before they passed.

3. During the last 8 years of his life, my father told me 5 or 6 times he was going to die soon...the last time was a month before he passed.

Aint nothin' "OT" or all that significant that El Ron told Sarge Hisself was gonna die soon, IMHO.

Face:)

PS: What is significant is that Sarge, bless his good and decent Heart, opened up and that Larry Wright--a World Class Journalist--was able to persevere, get and tell the Story.:clap:
 
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xseaorguk

Patron Meritorious

Quote;
I'll make one comment about Pfauth's story. It paints the picture that SIX WEEKS before Hubbard died he said he was going to die, i.e., this was a month before the stroke that killed him. Isn't Pfauth still a Ron-lover? Convenient that despite being a "failure" Hubbard was still able to predict/cause his own imminent death.

Paul


So maybe Mr. Flubbarlips really did haver OT powers, wow...I'm so impresssed
:clap:
 

ChurchOfCylontology

Patron with Honors

Quote;
I'll make one comment about Pfauth's story. It paints the picture that SIX WEEKS before Hubbard died he said he was going to die, i.e., this was a month before the stroke that killed him. Isn't Pfauth still a Ron-lover? Convenient that despite being a "failure" Hubbard was still able to predict/cause his own imminent death.

Paul


So maybe Mr. Flubbarlips really did haver OT powers, wow...I'm so impresssed
:clap:

Nothing amazing about thinking you are dying while being in your 70s and recently surviving a major stroke. No oatee marvels with that.
 

PirateAndBum

Gold Meritorious Patron
I found the bit from Sarge about constructing a BT zapper for Hubbo in his final days to be an interesting tidbit. Never heard that before. Pretty funny that Hubbo fried Sarge's meter trying it out. He elicited from Sarge that it was construed it as a suicide device, but it didn't seem to be that was Hubbo's intent.

I enjoyed the book. I found that it didn't flow well in a number of places. Non sequitur sequences left me thinking he could have done a better job of editing it to smooth out those spots.
 

PTSPal

Patron with Honors
I know there are threads about the release of his book, organized scientology's "attacking" this book and Marty Rathbun being critical of his book.

I thought though I would start a thread for all of us who have read the book and wanted to review it.

I will start the ball rolling by giving my honest review which I just put up on Amazon:


http://www.amazon.com/gp/pdp/profile/A3INT0L85FO4SI/ref=cm_cr_pr_pdp



If you want read the book before seeing what is in effect a "surprise ending" of an admission by Hubbard before dying, don't read this review.

FWIW here are my honest feelings about it for those who don't want to go to Amazon:

Denise,

what a well thought out review. I enjoyed it tremendously. Now I'm really looking forward to my read. Thanks...:happydance:
 

Free to shine

Shiny & Free
Denise, brilliant review. That will connect with many people ... pretty loving and objective for a bitter defrocked apostate! :biggrin:
 

Veda

Sponsor
Sure. This is JustMe's review:

This was by far the most insightful and well researched book on L Ron Hubbard, David Miscavige and Scientology that I have ever read.

In researching the material for the book the author and his assistants spoke with an unprecedented number of people (some 250 or so) who studied, witnessed and/or were part of the history of Scientology and its leaders.

The bibliography of the Scientology sources, media, books, articles and manuscript collections that the author consulted in studying the subjects shows the great pain that was clearly taken not only to be thorough with the facts in the book but also to try analyze the true story behind those facts and what it was that made both Hubbard and Miscavige (Scientology's two main leaders overthe years) what they were.

I believe Lawrence Wright has accomplished that well beyond anything ever published. And he did it in an objective, professional way while constantly striving to be fair.

There are also some 42 pages of detailed notes near the end of the book where the author gives his sources for what he wrote in the book, page by page.Simply amazing!

In my opinion this book could not even have been written had not Project Chanology Anonymous (acknowledged in the book) suddenly made it possible for thousands to come forward and speak out without being destroyed by Scientology's intelligence and litigation machine designed to stop others from freely speaking out.

Where one or a few of us have managed to speak out before or even protest,suddenly thousands donned the mask and marched in unison and in protest starting on February 10, 2008. The beauty of that was how it opened the door to many others coming out, speaking and taking a stance. This had turned the tide. Organized Scientology could not stop them and they were joined by so many others who finally saw they could stand up and speak out.

Simply put, without the actions started by Anonymous in 2008 many of thesources for this book would not have felt safe to come out and tell the truth.Thus this book could not have been written.

A great deal (but hardly all) of the facts covered in this book have been covered before. But the book lays out those facts in a clear, concise manner that helps the reader to understand not only the story of scientology but what it was that made its leaders what they became.

The author compassionately explores the life of L Ron Hubbard from his childhood, through his marriages, his time in the military, his friendships, his loves and his early writings. In countless writings and recordings about Hubbard in the past (if only on internet forum postings) writers often debated and tried to understand Hubbard as clearly one or the other: kind or cruel, aliar or a man of truth, sane or insane, a conman or an honest man, an abuser or a healer.

I think what the author tried to show was that Hubbard at different points was all of the above.

Combining Hubbard's own Affirmations with how he actually led his life, in my opinion the author gives a highly insightful perspective of Hubbard. It can be found onpage 54 of this book:

"If one looks behind the Affirmations to the condition they are meant to correct one sees a man who is ashamed of his tendency to fabricate personal stories, who is conflicted about his sexual needs, and who worries about his mortality. He has a predatory view of women but at the same time fears their power to humiliate him".

While we are each of us at times conflicted, even walking contradictions throughout our lives, the real problem with Hubbard's own conflicts as well covered in this book is was what they did to destroy the lives of so very many people over decades and indeed to this day some 27 years after Hubbard's death.

Some of the very worst parts of Hubbard became the very fabric of Scientology and organized Scientology. Woven throughout the policies and practices of organized Scientology one can see Hubbard's own paranoia and cruelty. Such things as the heartless internment camps known as "the Rehabilitation Project Force", heavy ethics for counter and other intentions (to hisown), the cruelty of disconnection and so much more was all to protect a technology Hubbard called priceless but was rather valueless to most who tried it.

As covered in the book, Hubbard's conflicts are also reflected in his writings where he saw enemies everywhere and demanded the destruction of all who opposed his will.

His incessant demands for money combined with his disdain of those who thought differently than he destroyed perhaps thousands of families, even lives. And, like Hubbard before him, David Miscavige to this day continues to profit on the anguish of others while cowardly hiding behind organized Scientology's myriad corporate veils so as not to be held liable for that of which he is completely liable.

As shown in this book, the stories of widespread abuse of children, beatings, forced incarcerations, financial scandals, greed, medical abuse and the like rampant within organized Scientology both through the times of Hubbard and continuing to this very day are as painful to see as they are numerous. The cruelty meted out on others in the name of "salvaging the planet" while profiting Hubbard and Miscavige is breathtaking in its scope.

One horrid example that has me in tears just to read it can be found page 157of the book. It is about an abused, pregnant mother sneaking out of the scientology's "Rehabilitation Project Force" without approval to see how her daughter was doing in the Scientology "Child Care Org":

"Taylor managed to slip away to visit her ten-month-old daughter in the Child Care Org across the street. To her horror, she discovered that Venessa had contracted whopping cough, which is highly contagious and occasionally fatal. The baby's eyes were welded shut with mucus, and her diaper was wet - infact her whole crib was soaking. She was covered with fruit flies. Taylor recoiled. The prospect of losing both her unborn baby and her daughter seemed very likely".

My God!!!!

So many misled people of good heart were and are a part of Scientology who themselves put it all on the line to dedicate themselves and their lives to the following of a man who would ultimately betray them. This book makes me feel a sadness for all the good souls who cared and who tried to follow a dream and were betrayed.

I love how insightful the author is when he analyzes the facts before him and tries to make it make sense. For example, as the book points out, Hubbard wrote a great deal of science fiction before he ever wrote anything about Scientology. And there are strong elements of science fiction in the hidden levels of Scientology. Reflecting on both, the author makes a simple yet in my opinion insightful statement on page 32 of the book:

"Certainly, the same mind that roamed so freely through imaginary universes might be inclined to look at the everyday world and suspect that there was something more behind the surface reality. The broad canvas of science fiction allowed Hubbard to think in large-scale terms about the human condition. He was bold. He was fanciful. He could easily invent an elaborate, plausible universe. But it is one thing to make that universe believable, and another to believe it. That is the difference between art and religion".

I agree with the author that while one can argue that Scientology is a religion it must not be allowed to carry out such horrid abuses on countless others while hiding from prosecution behind the cloak of religion.

More than whether or not Scientology is indeed a religion I think the really important question is whether or not it is charitable or even spiritual. I see nothing spiritual at all about Hubbard's and Miscavige's abuse of others, the incessant demands for money and just hundreds and hundreds of things that make up the very fabric of organized Scientology and the policies it follows.

Perhaps even more importantly, as is clear in reading the book, there is nothing inherently charitable about Scientology. People have to either pay vast sums or give up their personal freedoms to "progress" in Scientology.Their benign-sounding front groups in the field of business, education, drug abuse and the like are not there to freely help the downtrodden or otherwise needy. They are there solely to themselves be a conduit of money and people into Scientology. They are "PR" to try to make organized Scientology look good to the public while in many cases are themselves a danger to the public.

In the book examples are given where others speak of Hubbard's"research" and his "technology" that has helped them. And I am glad they were helped.

But Hubbard's research has no scientific validity and in my opinion is often the product of a deranged mind thinking that somehow he has made these brilliant scientific discoveries when he has not.

An example from the book is Hubbard's "research" resulting in "The Introspection Rundown" which, Hubbard says eliminates the last need for psychiatry. "Evidence" of its value is a story of a man who was crazed on a ship and a danger to others. Hubbard had him confined and treated gently and given healthy supplements. The man came out of it. I am so glad this happened to this man but my God that is hardly scientific study showing Hubbard's procedure eliminates the last need of psychiatry.

Related to this, the book debunks Hubbard's claims about psychology and medication in effect showing how Scientology not only may not help a person but it will often keep a person away from the very sources that can indeed help him.

Examples of this are given in the book including the death of a beautiful boy Kyle Brennan who died from an apparent suicide at Scientology's"mecca" in Florida after his medically prescribed medication was taken away from him due to Scientology's unfounded beliefs from Hubbard's writings.

And, carrying on from what Hubbard preached, the book tells of a speech given by Scientology's current abusive leader David Miscavige saying that he intends to obliterate psychiatry, wiping it from the face of the earth.

My God how dangerous a view is that?

People have had "wins" in Scientology therapy which the author feels is akin more to psychotherapy which perhaps is Scientology's "more respectable cousin". But I submit that some of the beautiful and well-meaning people who are trying to help others using this"therapy" are more helping those people because they are good and kind people who give the others someone to whom they can pour out their hearts and discuss their troubles.

And that is all well and good until someone really needs professional help and there is no one within Scientology who is trained to give that help.

Later in the book, on page 359, the author speaks of how Scientology wants to be understood as a scientific approach to spiritual enlightenment but concludes that it really has no basis in science at all. Perhaps, he says, it would be better understood as a philosophy of the human nature.

As usual organized Scientology denies everything in this book that is negative. I would like to believe them but I can't. Although I was a small contributor of information to Lawrence Wright in his research, I know of so much of this book as being true from first hand observation.

I feel love and compassion for the many, many good souls who are Scientologists and who are trying to help others. I was once one of them. But I also feel a great sadness of just how these people were and are being betrayed by Hubbard, by Miscavige and indeed by a dream of a "heaven" which to many of them has turned out to be a "hell".

I wish all of them the greatest of healing and of peace. And I want them to know there are many of us out here with open arms ready to welcome them to join us as imperfect but free sisters and brothers who will help them heal.

And I wish to express my great thanks to Lawrence Wright and all who assisted him for this magnificent work that I believe will end up helping many people.

Perhaps the real sadness of all this is best reflected in some of the final words from the book telling of a time that was a few weeks before Hubbard's death when Hubbard summoned one he trusted at a ranch where he was hiding:

"Six weeks before the leader died, Pfauth hesitantly related, Hubbard called him into the bus. He was sitting in his little breakfast nook. `He told me he was dropping his body.......He told me he failed, he's leaving.'..............................

I mentioned the legend in Scientology that Hubbard would return.

`That's bull crap,' Pfauth said. `He wanted to drop the body and leave. And he told me basically that he failed. All the work and everything, he'd failed".

-----

I'll make one comment about Pfauth's story. It paints the picture that SIX WEEKS before Hubbard died he said he was going to die, i.e., this was a month before the stroke that killed him. Isn't Pfauth still a Ron-lover? Convenient that despite being a "failure" Hubbard was still able to predict/cause his own imminent death.

Paul

Thanks.

Watch out if some Independent Scientology PR gets a hold of this:

LRH, toward the end of his present incarnation,
said that he "failed," failed on his mission to free all Mankind
in this lifetime, while having been under relentless attack for years
by those who wanted to destroy Scientology.
old-L-Ron-Hubbard.jpg

LRH didn't fail. We failed LRH.
All of us could have done more.
Studied harder, duplicated better, tried harder.
We were spoiled.
Feel ashamed? You should be. We all should.
But there is hope. LRH is watching.
Don't let him down again.
The big push is on, and this time we mean it.
THREE CHEERS FOR LRH!!!



Note: My guess is that Hubbard was only feeling sorry for himself when he said these things to Sarge. At the time he expressed no interest in anyone else, especially in Scientologists, who continued to slave for him.

He could have told them to go home and live normal lives and he didn't.

As far as I can guess, Hubbard was disappointed that his hope of becoming a forever-young superman/god had not succeeded.

He had, however, succeeded in establishing his alter-ego: the cult of LRH, both inside and outside of the CofS, and he did succeed in establishing trusts for projects to keep his name alive for "ever," in front groups such as "L. Ron Hubbard presents," and in buried vaults containing his writings and name, and in such things as the Messiah Project.

Most of all he established a mental-healing-coated personality cult, with its own intelligence department, and with dozens if not hundreds of front groups.

So, apart from his depressed, self-pitying, comments to Sarge, he did not fail completely.

But wait and see if some PR doesn't pick up on this "fail" idea and run with it. Hubbard may become a sympathetic figure yet.
 

JustMe

Patron Meritorious
Denise, you are an amazing lady and I loved your review of Wright's book, but I still disagree with giving Rathbun any stars for his "books".

I know that comes from your heart and, as always, I greatly respect your views.

Now let me explain FWIW. I suspect many will disagree with this which of course is fine.

In my final days posting as Larry I tried to make what I felt were several important posts before my final thread where I pretty much imploded on here taking off my mask of "Larry" and trying to introduce the real me. In the few days before that I made final postings as Larry trying to really show how it is the truth that will take down scientology in its present form, introducing everyone to my beautiful granddaughter and then giving my views on Marty.

What I had say about Marty was this post:


http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthre...Y-HOSTILE-thread-by-Marty&p=674031#post674031


I am no better than any of us including Marty, I do not wish to hurt anyone and post more from my heart than my mind. I could be wrong but I feel Marty is in a deep, dark place and he doesn't even know it. It saddens me to think of what he has yet to go through.

But I felt it was important to review his two books for the reasons I gave in the reviews. I tried to be kind and validate him for the "good parts" and for trying.

I often reflect on what I feel is one of the most beautiful Anon vids prepared by L Ron Hu88ard called "The Lighthouse Letter".

The whole poem gets to me and often brings me to tears as it so gently shows the awful pain of disconnection in scientology. The below bit from the the beginning of that poem gets to me the most. It makes me think of those lost in the deep, dark cavern of scientology yet there is still hope for them and we should help them out and give them a hand to find their way out to the dazzing light of freedom. We can even be their eyes to get out of the darkness. It went something like this:

Deep within a cavern dark
A spring of truth abides
How I hope your find this bottle
My kisses are inside

The light outside is dazzling
Escape's a costly prize
But gentle reader grasp my hand
And I shall be your eyes.


This may never happen and Marty may hate me, and never ever reach out to me for help. He probably thinks I am crazy if he thinks of me at all. My reviews probably annoy him as they are sitting there as the first reviews to see when anyone wants to check out his books on Amazon. But my hand is out there for him to help him get out too. And while my reviews showed some major disagreements with what he wrote, they also showed where I agreed with him.

Anyway all of the above is why I gave the reviews three stars out of five. I did not try to review the books for their lack of literary quality. I would probably do no better.
 
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HelluvaHoax!

Platinum Meritorious Sponsor with bells on


Amongst all things, one of the greatest gifts one can have or give another is clarity.

Your kindness & clarity on Scientology, Hubbard and everyone that followed that path is astonishing.

Thank you!

JustMe's (erstwhile Lovinglife625) message re-posted in full, below:


I do not hate Marty and I do not wish to make fun of Marty. And I do not wish to say that I am somehow smarter than or in any way better than Marty.

I am not.

Marty worked for me for about a year and a half before he moved to RTC. He was a hard worker and did not do any of those abusive things to staff that he did to them later. As WDC X and his senior I would not have allowed that in my juniors. I believe even Marty would testify to that. Certainly Karen #1 who also worked for me in Special Unit then would.

That said, it is my opinion that Marty is completely lost and has not even come close to facing the demons he has to someday face when he truly realizes what he has done is not in any way justified by supporting Hubbard and scientology.

The reason why I posted that issue in the #3 posting of this thread is that I believe it is important to understand that Marty oversaw the crushing of the truth and of others in the legal arena, much of which I believe he still thinks is somehow justified. My God it is just not right to shudder someone into silence, force them to settle and then later belittle them for settling.

While Marty's part of Special Unit (the litigation part) was more directly run day to day by Norman Starkey and Miscavige out of Author Services and not by me as Special Unit IC, I still am responsible for it and I deeply regret everything that was done to silence and otherwise try to destroy others on my watch. I find it almost unbearable that this was done on my watch and have tried for years to make up for it in any way I honestly can.

A few more examples that I think are sad.

Marty has had nice things to say about Mary Sue Hubbard and pointed out how badly Miscavige abused her. What I have not seen him say, and perhaps I have missed it, is that he was one of the 17 or so men who went to a weak and frail MarySue shortly after Hubbard died and overwhelmed her into forcibly signing away her rights to the fortune that Hubbard took from organized scientology, much through fraud and horrid intimidation.

Marty had wonderful things to say about Anne Broker and how she went back after escaping the int base as she somehow wanted to protect Hubbard's image or scientology or whatever. But it was Marty who went out and stopped her escape to freedom and dragged her back to the hell, THE HELL, of int where she would live a virtual prisoner the rest of her life, never again to enjoy real freedom and to die horribly.

Marty criticized Miscavige for the squirrel introspection rundown done on Lisa over seventeen days saying it should have been done in two days. My God a beautiful person was KILLED by them following the policies of a man who had ZERO business dealing with matters of mental health and who himself died an incompetent raging madman. Rather than dedicating oneself to making sure such practices are ended forever, Marty is the one to cover up much of the horror (something he admits at least as far as destroying evidence before the police could find it goes). But he still condones the madness of what Hubbard wrote. My God Hubbard said that the last need for psychiatry was gone with this great discovery. He was AT BEST an egotistical madman yet Marty and others glorify him and, more importantly, such dangerous practices.

Marty also sees OSA on all these forums, accusing some others with whom he disagrees as being OSA as if they are something truly to be feared. Personally I think OSA is a joke and welcome them to speak with me anytime. Heck I just had some religious scholar speak with me for about an hour and a half or so who sounds like a really good guy. His first five minutes was trying to explain to me how he was not OSA and I kept telling him I did not care anyway. Screw OSA!!

Marty is in this imagined fight for a tech that is and will remain meaningless and unhelpful to 99%+++ of the population. The "movement" of indees is not and never will amount to much in numbers IMO. Let anyone of them of good heart freely practice the non abusive parts of the "tech" that many of them probably do. That is their right. But the entire idea of it being some great movement, of it protecting a tech even remotely helpful to the world or the imagining of some holy war being raged is a sad, sad and pathetic joke.

One of his goals is to make the public see the difference between his "version" of Hubbard/scientology and that of organized scientology's. What he just does not seem to get is that the public sees them as one and the same and all the coverage he gets and actions he takes is just helping the public to see that it is scientology itself that is that from which one should stay away.

He is helpng do the job of Project Chanology Anonymous and everyone else of good heart who speaks the truth and wishes to stop the madness. He just doesn't realize it.

On a personal level, when I said I was leaving staff with my one year old child in 1984 it was Marty who tried to pressure me into staying saying I was out-ethics for wanting to leave and I should do the RPF. I refused but had I listened my God they would have had control of my one year old baby and it is my belief the greatest thing in my life (a happy daughter and wonderful granddaughter) would never have happened. THAT Marty is what you can destroy by putting Hubbard and his "tech" above family and love.

I'm sure you think I do not get it or I am some big SP but I submit that you don't get it that there is so SO much of love so much better than Hubbard or his "tech" and you have been a big part of destroying it.

THANK YOU for helping point out abuses by Miscavige. But you still have a long way to go, and deeper to go than Miscavige, to find the real causes of abuses in scientology. Like all of us, you have demons of past misdeeds to fight.

Again, I do not hate Marty and I will speak out for the freedom of anyone to have their beliefs, including Marty, as long as they do not hurt others in their practices.

I just think that this whole thing is just, in a word, sad.



brb I haz a sad
 

Gib

Crusader
Amongst all things, one of the greatest gifts one can have or give another is clarity.

Your kindness & clarity on Scientology, Hubbard and everyone that followed that path is astonishing.

Thank you!

JustMe's (erstwhile Lovinglife625) message re-posted in full, below:

""Six weeks before the leader died, Pfauth hesitantly related, Hubbard called him into the bus. He was sitting in his little breakfast nook. `He told me he was dropping his body.......He told me he failed, he's leaving.'...."

How many times has hubbard told us he failed? and only to be surrounded (hidden) with PR, the carrot?

Hubbard got lucky with DMSMH, and on the good backs of people figuring it out, many years later, why the work was free, in his eyes and PR, but not free in those that contributed. But the work was not complete. As is the story of history into the mystics of life.
 

ChurchOfCylontology

Patron with Honors
I know that comes from your heart and, as always, I greatly respect your views.

Now let me explain FWIW. I suspect many will disagree with this which of course is fine.

In my final days posting as Larry I tried to make what I felt were several important posts before my final thread where I pretty much imploded on here taking off my mask of "Larry" and trying to introduce the real me. In the few days before that I made final postings as Larry trying to really show how it is the truth that will take down scientology in its present form, introducing everyone to my beautiful granddaughter and then giving my views on Marty.

What I had say about Marty was this post:


http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthre...Y-HOSTILE-thread-by-Marty&p=674031#post674031


I am no better than any of us including Marty, I do not wish to hurt anyone and post more from my heart than my mind. I could be wrong but I feel Marty is in a deep, dark place and he doesn't even know it. It saddens me to think of what he has yet to go through.

But I felt it was important to review his two books for the reasons I gave in the reviews. I tried to be kind and validate him for the "good parts" and for trying.

I often reflect on what I feel is one of the most beautiful Anon vids prepared by L Ron Hu88ard called "The Lighthouse Letter".

The whole poem gets to me and often brings me to tears as it so gently shows the awful pain of disconnection in scientology. The below bit from the the beginning of that poem gets to me the most. It makes me think of those lost in the deep, dark cavern of scientology yet there is still hope for them and we should help them out and give them a hand to find their way out to the dazzing light of freedom. We can even be their eyes to get out of the darkness. It went something like this:

Deep within a cavern dark
A spring of truth abides
How I hope your find this bottle
My kisses are inside

The light outside is dazzling
Escape's a costly prize
But gentle reader grasp my hand
And I shall be your eyes.


This may never happen and Marty may hate me, and never ever reach out to me for help. He probably thinks I am crazy if he thinks of me at all. My reviews probably annoy him as they are sitting there as the first reviews to see when anyone wants to check out his books on Amazon. But my hand is out there for him to help him get out too. And while my reviews showed some major disagreements with what he wrote, they also showed where I agreed with him.

Anyway all of the above is why I gave the reviews three stars out of five. I did not try to review the books for their lack of literary quality. I would probably do no better.

Thanks, Denise. You've given me some good stuff here to think about (as always). I really wish I could see his existence through your eyes, but I only see him as a sad, deluded ex-mob enforcer that deserves to be behind bars instead of continuing his life without being held accountable for what he did. His actions led to the defrauding of the US Government of countless millions, obstructing justice, harassment and stalking, assault and battery, just to name a few of his actual crimes.

I really do appreciate your views, and I look up to you for so many reasons. Thanks again....
 
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